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SUSQUEHANNA 
UNIVERSITY 



BULLETIN 



SELINSGROVE 

PENNSYLVANIA 




CATALOGUE ISSUE 1943-44 and 1944-45 
ANNOUNCEMENTS 1945-1946 




SEIBERT HALL 



Susquehanna University 
Bulletin 



NO. 4 



OCTOBER-DECEMBER 



SERIES XLI 



Catalogue Number 




ACADEMIC EECORD 19-13-44 and 1944-45 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 1945-46 



Published quarterly by Susquehanna University, Selinsgrove, Pennsyl- 
vania, and entered as second-class matter at Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania, 
January 1, 1923, under Act of Congress of August 24, 1912. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

PAGE 

1. Susquehanna and The Returning Veterans 5 

2. College Calendar 7 

3. Historical 9 

4. Board of Directors 10 

5. Administration Officers and Staff 12 

6. Faculty 13 

7. Faculty Committees 17 

8. Purpose and Objectives 18 

9. Recognition by Accrediting Agencies 18 

10. Buildings and Equipment 19 

11. Student Interest 21 

12. Discipline 24 

13. Prizes and Scholarships 25 

14. Health Service 27 

15. Housing and Boarding Facilities 28 

16. Working Positions and Scholarship Grants 29 

17. Special Events 30 

18. Expenses 31 

19. Personal Attention for the Individual Student 33 

20. Educational and Vocational Guidance 35 

21. Preparation for a Career 37 

22. Admission 50 

23. Entrance Requirements 51 

24. Registration 51 

25. Majors and Minors 52 

26. Graduation Requirements 53 

27. Honors at Graduation 53 

28. Reports 54 

29. Attendance Regulations 54 

30. Accelerated Academic Year 54 

31. Course Requirements for Degrees 55 

32. Courses of Instruction 59 

Art 59 Greek 80 

Bible and Religion 59 History and Political Science _ 82 

Biology 61 Latin 83 

Business Administration 63 Mathematics 85 

Chemistry 66 Music 87 

Commercial Education 68 Philosophy 87 

Economics 71 Physical Education 88 

Education 73 Physics 90 

English 74 Psychology 91 

French 77 Sociology 92 

General Science 79 Spanish 93 

German 79 Speech 94 

33. Conservatory of Music 95 

34. Music Organizations 95 

35. Conservatory of Music Expenses 98 

36. Requirements for Music Degrees 99 

37. Instrumental Courses 101 

38. Description of Music Courses 102 

39. Alumni Association 111 

40. Ladies' Auxiliary 112 

41. Degrees Conferred 113 

42. Student Register 115 

43. Enrollment Statistics 125 

44. Index 127 









CALENDAR 1945 








JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


S M 


T W T 


F 


s 


S 


M T W T F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F S 


1 


2 3 4 


5 


6 




1 2 


3 






1 


2 3 


7 8 


9 10 11 


12 


13 


4 


5 6 7 8 9 


10 


4 


5 


6 7 8 


9 10 


14 15 


16 17 18 


19 


20 


11 


12 13 14 15 16 


17 


11 


12 


13 14 15 


16 17 


21 22 


23 24 25 


26 


27 


18 


19 20 21 22 23 


24 


18 


19 


20 21 22 


23 24 


28 29 


30 31 






25 


26 27 28 




25 


26 


27 28 29 


30 31 


APRIL 


MAY 






JUNE 




1 2 


3 4 5 


6 


7 




12 3 4 


5 








1 2 


8 9 


10 11 12 


13 


14 


6 


7 8 9 10 11 


12 


3 


4 


5 6 7 


8 9 


15 16 


17 18 19 


20 


21 


13 


14 15 16 17 18 


19 


10 


11 


12 13 14 


15 16 


22 23 


24 25 26 


27 


28 


20 


21 22 23 24 25 


26 


17 


18 


19 20 21 


22 23 


29 30 








27 


28 29 30 31 




24 


25 


26 27 28 


29 30 


JULY 


AUGUST 


SEPTEMBER 


1 2 


3 4 5 


6 


7 




12 3 


4 








1 


8 9 


10 11 12 


13 


14 


5 


6 7 8 9 10 


11 


2 


3 


4 5 6 


7 8 


15 16 


17 18 19 


20 


21 


12 


13 14 15 16 17 


18 


9 


10 


11 12 13 


14 15 


22 23 


24 25 26 


27 


28 


19 


20 21 22 23 24 


25 


16 


17 


18 19 20 


21 22 


29 30 


31 






26 


27 28 29 30 31 




23 
30 


24 


25 26 27 


28 29 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


1 


2 3 4 


5 


6 




1 2 


3 








1 


7 8 


9 10 11 


12 


13 


4 


5 6 7 8 9 


10 


2 


3 


4 5 6 


7 8 


14 15 


16 17 18 


19 


20 


11 


12 13 14 15 16 


17 


9 


10 


11 12 13 


14 15 


21 22 


23 24 25 


26 


27 


18 


19 20 21 22 23 


24 


16 


17 


18 19 20 


21 22 


28 29 


30 31 






25 


26 27 28 29 30 




23 
30 


24 
31 


25 26 27 


28 29 


CALENDAR 1946 


JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M T W T F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F S 




1 2 3 


4 


5 




1 


2 








1 2 


6 7 


8 it L0 


11 


12 


8 


4 5 6 7 8 


9 


8 


4 


6 7 


8 9 


13 14 


L6 10 17 


18 


19 


10 


11 12 13 li i:» 


16 


10 


11 


12 13 14 


15 16 


20 21 


22 2:: 24 


25 


26 


17 


18 19 20 21 22 


23 


17 


18 


19 20 21 


22 23 


27 28 


10 31 






24 


25 26 27 28 




21 
31 




27 28 


29 30 


APR II, 


MAY 


JUNE 


1 


2 3 4 


5 


6 




12 3 


4 








1 


T - 


9 in 11 


112 


l:: 


5 


'•789 10 


11 


2 




1 




11 if, 


L6 17 18 


L9 


20 


L2 


18 li L6 16 17 


18 


9 


10 


11 12 18 


11 If. 


21 22 


23 21 26 


28 


27 


L9 


2n 21 22 2:; 21 


25 


16 


17 


18 ' 


21 22 




30 






26 


27 28 29 30 31 




23 
30 


2 1 









SUSQUEHANNA, THE WAR, AND 
THE RETURNING VETERAN 



Since Mat, 1944, Susquehanna has resumed the status of a civilian 
college. For fourteen months previous to that date, it was one of 
the selected colleges offering the Army Air Forces College Training 
Program as part of the huge development of the Army Air Corps. 
With the termination of this program in all of the cooperating col- 
leges, Susquehanna has returned to a civilian status. This does not 
mean that the College believes that the war is over. But the termi- 
nation of the Air Corps Program does mean that Susquehanna can 
now turn its attention to welcoming back the veteran, who is returning 
to the colleges in ever increasing numbers. 

Accordingly, under the educational provisions of the G-. I. Bill, 
the College is prepared to take care of (1) its former students who 
were called out of college into service and who wish to complete their 
interrupted college courses, (2) aviation students of the Army Air 
Forces who took their college training course at Susquehanna, (3) 
high school graduates who were prevented from entering college 
because of the war and (4) high school graduates who had not origi- 
nally intended to go to college but who will now be able to do so 
under the G. I. Bill. 

For these returning veterans, Susquehanna is prepared to offer 
the following special services: 

1. Counselling in the necessary procedures to qualify for the financial 
grants of the G. I. Bill. 

2. Guidance in the selection of the proper vocations and college 
courses. 

3. Vocational Testing to determine if the veteran's choice is in 
accordance with his ability and experience. 

4. Assistance and Advice in getting college credit through the Armed 
Forces Institute for the academic training, correspondence study, 
and educational experience which the veteran got in the armed 
services. 

5. An Accelerated College Program, including a summer term of 
twelve weeks, and class schedules as heavy as he can successfully 
carry, to enable the returning veteran to speed up his education and 
reduce the usual four-year course to three years or less. 



6 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

6. Provisions for Starting College Work at Numerous Times During 
the Year. Returning veterans should enter classes if possible on 
one of the four regular entrance dates during the year, namely, in 
mid-September, late January, mid-June or late July. 

However, in case these dates are inconvenient or impossible, 
special arrangements will be made to start veterans on refresher 
courses or regular college studies on a tutoring basis at convenient 
dates during the regular semesters. 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 



SECOND SEMESTER 1944-45 

January 27 aud 29, Saturday and 

Monday Mid- Year Vacation 

January 30, Tuesday, 8 :00 a. m. Registration for Second 

Semester 

January 31, "Wednesday, 8 :00 a. m. — College Exercises Open on 

Regular Schedule 

March 1, Thursday Academic Recognition Day 

March 28, Wednesday, noon _ Easter Recess Begins 

April 2, Monday, 1 :00 p. m. College Exercises Resume 

May 12, Saturday Sub-Freshman Day 

May 25, Friday Baccalaureate Service 

May 26, Saturday Commencement Day 

SUMMER SCHOOL 1945 

June 19, Tuesday Registration Day 

June 20, Wednesday, 8 :00 a. m. First Term Begins. 

July 4, Wednesday Independence Day, Holiday 

July 28, Saturday First Term Ends 

July 30, Monday Registration for Second Term 

July 31, Tuesday, 8:00 a. m. Classes Begin 

September 3, Monday Labor Day, Holiday 

September 8, Saturday Second Term Ends 

FIRST SEMESTER 1945-46 

September 15, Saturday Freshmen Arrive for Orienta- 
tion Program 

September 18, Tuesday Freshman Registration 

September 19, Wednesday Registration of Other Classes 

September 20, Thursday, 9 :00 a. m. _ Matriculation Day Exercises 



8 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

September 20, Thursday, 10 :10 a. m. _ College Exercises Open on 

Regular Schedule 
September 20, Thursday, 8 :00 p. m. _ Faculty Reception to Students 

(Founders' Day 
October 13, Saturday /Parents' Day and 

^Homecoming, Holiday 

November 22, Thursday Thanksgiving Day, Holiday 

December 19, "Wednesday, noon Christmas Recess Begins 

January 3, Thursday, 8:00 a.m. College Exercises Resume 

January 25, Friday Semester Ends 

SECOND SEMESTER 1945-46 

January 26 and 28, Saturday and 

Monday Mid- Year Vacation 

January 29, Tuesday, 8:00 a. m. Registration for Second 

Semester 

January 30, "Wednesday, 8 :00 a. m. _ College Exercises Open on 

Regular Schedule 

March 1, Friday Academic Recognition Day 

April 17, "Wednesday, noon Easter Recess Begins 

April 22, Monday, 1:00 p. m. College Exercises Resume 

May 11, Saturday Sub-Freshman Day 

May 24, Friday Baccalaureate Service 

May 25, Saturday Commencement Day 




PINE LAWN 



AERIAL VIEW OF SUSQUEHANNA CAMPUS 



THE LIBRARY 
CONSERVATORY OF 
MUSIC 



MEN'S ATHLETIC FIELDS 

GUSTAVUS ADOLPHUS HALL 



HASSINGER HALL 

SELINSGROVE HALL 
SEIBERT HALL 



MENS TENNIS COURTS 

HEATING PLANT 
ALUMNI GYMNASIUM 
WOMEN'S ATHLETIC FIELD 
STEELE SCIENCE HALL 



I 



HISTORICAL 



Susquehanna University had its beginning as Missionary Institute, 
the corner-stone of which was laid on September 1, 1858. The 
founder was the Reverend Dr. Benjamin Kurtz, an eminent divine 
of the Lutheran Church of his day. The school was established to 
supply the need for more ministers. From this original motive it 
has broadened its scope to include the preparation of young men and 
young women for all honorable vocations in life, never ceasing to 
emphasize the necessity of the Christian ethic in all true education. 
In 1895, its corporate name was changed to Susquehanna Uni- 
versity. Born in faith, organized and promoted through prayer, it 
has grown steadily to its present strength. 

The following men have served as presidents : 

1858-1865 Benjamin Kurtz, D.D., LL.D. 

1865-1881 Henry Zeigler, D.D. 

1881-1893 Peter Born, D.D. 

1893-1895 Franklin P. Manhart, D.D., LL.D. 

1895-1899 J. E. Dimm, D.D., LL.D. 

1899-1901 C. W. Heisler, D.D. 

1901-1902 John I. Woodruff, Litt.D., LL.D., Acting 

President 

1902-1904 G. W. Enders, D.D. 

1904-1905 J. B. Focht, D.D. 

1905-1927 Charles T. Aikens, D.D. 

1928- G. Morris Smith, A.M., D.D., LL.D. 

LOCATION 

Susquehanna University is located at Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania, 
a town of three thousand inhabitants, five miles south of Sunbury 
and forty-five miles north of Harrisburg. The campus of sixty-two 
acres adjoins the borough limits. Selinsgrove is easily reached by 
bus connection from Sunbury, which is a main stop on the Williams- 
port division of the Pennsylvania Railroad. The Reading trains 
from Philadelphia and New York also stop at Sunbury, while 
Northumberland, seven miles from the campus, is the terminus of 
the Lackawanna Railroad from Scranton and the north. Those 
coming by motor may use Route 11, the Susquehanna Trail, or Route 
522 from Lewistown and the west. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 

William M. Rearick, A.M., D.D. President 

Ki v. John F. Harkins, A.M., D.D. First Vice-President 

Claude G. Aikens, B.S. Second Vice-President 

Frank A. Ever Secretary-Treasurer 

Hon. <'iiakles Steele, A.M. Endowment Treasurer 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
G. Morris Smith, President 

Frank A. Ever Dan Smith, Jr. 

Hon. Benjamin Apple Hon. Charles Steele 

J. P. Carpenter, Esq. J. D. Bogar, Jr. 

Samuel J. Johnston W. M. Reariok 

MEMBERS 

Term Expires 191,9 

M. P. Molleb, Jr.. B.S. Hagerstown, Md. 

William M. Kiakkk. A.M., D.D. Mifflinburg, Pa. 

!.. S. Landes, M.D., 454 W. Market St. York, Pa. 

BO] B. Wolf. 38 W. Fourth St. Williamsport, Pa. 

IIo\. Charles Steele, A.M. Xorthurnberland, Pa. 

m Expires 191,8 

!'.!'.. I. I..D.. 6409 X. Sixth St. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

J. Frank Thompson, I'.. Afarkel and Kershaw Sts. York, Pa. 

II. < i Hazleton, Pa. 

<i. D. Ki.i mi:im; State College, Pa. 

P. M. Hi UHNGS Lewistown, Pa. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 11 

Term Expires 1947 

J. P. Carpenter, Esq., A.B., A.M. Sunbury, Pa. 

Eev. H. W. Miller, D.D., 1010 Elmira St Williamsport, Pa. 

Rev. John F. Harkins, A.M., D.D. State College, Pa. 

Dan Smith, Jr., 225 E. Third St. Williamsport, Pa. 

Marion S. Schoch, B.S., M.Lit. Selinsgrove, Pa. 

J. D. Bogar, Jr. Harrisburg, Pa. 

Term Expires 19^6 

Samuel J. Johnston Bloomsburg, Pa. 

I. A. Shaffer, Jr. Lock Haven, Pa. 

Rev. L. Stoy Spangler Newport, Pa. 

Charles A. Nicely Watsontown, Pa. 

Rev. G. B. Harman Duncansville, Pa. 

F. E. Ehrenfeld, B.S. Philipsburg, Pa. 

Term Expires 1945 

Claude G. Aikens, B.S. State College, Pa. 

Hon. Benjamin Apple Sunbury, Pa. 

Frank A. Eyer Selinsgrove, Pa. 

Henry K. Schoch Fryeburg, Maine 

G. Morris Smith, A.M., D.D., LL.D. Selinsgrove, Pa. 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 
AND STAFF 

1944-45 

G. Morris Smith, A.M., D.D., LL.D. President 

Russell Galt, Ph.D. Dean 

Miriam L. Uxangst, A.B. Dean of Women 

MJEts. Helen Patterson Ulrich, B.S. Secretary of Admissions 

Audrey North, A.B., A.M., in Lib. Sci. Librarian 

Ernest T. Yorty Business Manager 

E. Beatrice Herman, A.B. Bursar 

Edwin Monroe Brungart, A.M. Superintendent of Buildings 

and Grounds 

Mm Anna Milleb Humphrey Dietitian 

IIkktiia M. Ih in. U.X". Assistant to the Dean of Women 

Ath ai.ia T. Kline. A.M. Faculty Resident in Hassinger Hall 

Mi:s. M \i:v Eoen Koch Matron in Hassinger Hall 

Elizabeth V. Smith, A.B. Secretary to the President 

Isabel Nicely Secretary to the Dean 

I: i ii K. McCorkill, B.S. Business Secretary 



THE FACULTY 



1943-1944 and 1944-1945 

G. Morris Smith President 

A.B., Roanoke College 1911; A.M., Princeton University 1912; 
Diploma, Lutheran Theological Seminary, Philadelphia 1919; D.D., 
Roanoke College 1928; Graduate study, Columbia University; 
LL.D., Bucknell 1940. 

Russell Galt Dean of the College 

A.B., Muskingum College 1919; A.M. 1920 and Ph.D. 1932, Colum- 
bia University; School of Oriental Studies, Cairo, Egypt, 1920-22. 

John Irwin Woodruff Professor Emeritus of Philosophy 

Diploma, Missionary Institute 1888; A.B. 1890 and A.M. 1893, 

Bucknell University; Litt.D., Wittenberg College 1903; LL.D., 
Waynesburg College 1921. 

George Elmer Fisher Professor of Chemistry 

Diploma, Missionary Institute 1888; Ph.B., Bucknell University 
1891; Ph.D., Illinois Wesleyan University 1905. 

Theodore William Kretschmann Professor of Bible and Religion 

A.B., 1888, A.M. and B.D., 1891, University of Pennsylvania; 
Diploma Lutheran Theological Seminary, Philadelphia 1891; Ph.D., 
University of Pennsylvania 1892. 

George Franklin Dunkelberger Professor of Education 

and Psychology 
A.B., Susquehanna University 1908; A.M., University of Pitts- 
burgh 1919; Pd.D., Susquehanna University 1921; Ph.D., New 
York University 1927; Graduate study, Columbia University. 

Augustus William Ahl Professor of Greek 

Diploma, Gymnasium and Seminary, Breklum, Germany, 1908; 
A.M., Susquehanna University 1912; Ph.D., Vanderbilt Univer- 
sity 1920; Graduate study, Peabody College for Teachers, Nash- 
ville, Tenn. 

Arthur Herman Wilson Professor of English 

A.B. 1927, A.M. 1929, and Ph.D. 1931, University of Pennsylvania. 

William Adam Russ, Jr. Professor of History and Political Science 
A.B., Ohio Wesleyan 1924; A.M., University of Cincinnati 1926; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago 1933. 



14 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Russell Wieder Gilbert Professor of German 

A.B., Muhlenberg College 1927; A.M. 1929 and Ph.D. 1943, Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania. 

Lois Margretta Boe* Professor of French and Spanish 

A.B., Augustana College 1930; A.M. 1931 and Ph.D. 1935, Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin. 

Amos Alonzo Stagg, Jr. Professor of Physical Education 

Ph.B., 1923 and A.M., 1935, University of Chicago; A.M., Columbia 
University 1941; Graduate study, University of Chicago. 

Fisk William Stocking Scudder Professor of Biology 

A.B., Ohio Wesleyan University 1923; Ohio Wesleyan University 
1924-25; Ph.D., Cornell University 1938. 

John Jacob Houtz Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Mathematics 
A.B., Susquehanna University 1908; M.S., Louisiana State Univer- 
sity 1912; Sc.D., Carthage College 1933. 

Harvey Alfred Heath* Assistant Professor of Economics and 

Business Administration 
University of Lyon, France, 1919; B.S. in Business Administration, 
1924, and A.M. 1926, University of Nebraska; Ph.D., University 
of Pittsburgh 1939; Graduate study, University of Nebraska, Ohio 
State University. 

Grover C. T. Graham Assistant Professor of Economics and 

Business Administration 
A.B., William Jewell College 1909; A.M., Brown University 1910; 
Graduate study, Brown University. 

Daniel Irvin Reitz Assistant Professor of Commercial Education 

Ph.B., Muhlenberg College 1926; A.M., University of Pennsylvania 
1930. 

George Merritt Robison Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

and Physics 
A.B., 1916, M. A., 1917, and Ph.D., 1919, Cornell University. 

Walter Butler Kelly* Assistant Professor of English 

B.S., Ursinus College 1937; A.M., University of Pennsylvania 
1940; Graduate study, Pennsylvania State College, University of 
Pennsylvania, Middlebury College. 

Lknora Allison Instructor in Commercial Education 

A.B., Bowling Green College of Commerce 1930; M. Ed., University 
of Pittsburgh 1937. 

Edna Irene Shire Instructor in Physical Education 

B.S., Sargent College of Physical Education, Boston University 
: A.M., Columbia University 1939; Graduate study, Bucknell 
University. 

.:n-,\. , n ,j f reK ular college yenr 1948-44. 



THE FACULTY 15 

Athalia Tabitha Kline Instructor in French and Spanish 

A.B., Randolph Macon Woman's College 1922; A.M., Duke Uni- 
versity 1925. 

Audrey North Lecturer in Library Science 

A.B., Rockford College 1937; B.S. in Library Science, University 
of Buffalo 1938; A.M. in Library Science, University of Michigan 
1944. 

Bertha Mabel Hein Lecturer in Medical Secretarial Subjects 

Diploma 1908, Allentown Hospital Training School for Nurses; 
R.N. 1909, Pennsylvania State Board for Registration of Nurses; 
Diploma 1924, Baltimore Lutheran Deaconess Training School. 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

E. Edwin Sheldon Director of Conservatory of Music, 

Professor of Pianoforte, Music Form, Canon-Fugue 

Graduate, New England Conservatory of Music 1900; Graduate, 

New York University 1921; Mus.M., Susquehanna University 1908; 

Mus.D., Susquehanna University 1939. 

Percy Mathias Linebaugh 

Professor of Pipe Organ, Pianoforte, Counterpoint 

Mus.B., Lebanon Valley College 1917; Graduate study, New York 
University, Peabody Conservatory of Music. 

Frederick Clement Stevens* 

Assistant Professor of Singing and Lecturer in Sociology 

A.B., University of Minnesota 1926; A.M., Columbia University 
1932; Voice study in Paris 1927-29; Graduate study, Peabody 
Conservatory. 

Ida Maneval Sheldon Instructor in History of Music 

Mus.B., Susquehanna University 1907; Graduate study, New York 
University. 

Mary Kathryn Potteiger Instructor in Pianoforte, Sight Singing 

Mus.B., Susquehanna University 1925; Graduate study, New York 
University. 

Alice Holmen Giauque** Instructor in Public School Music Methods, 

Music Appreciation, Chorus, Singing 
B.S. in Music Education 1937 and A.M. 1940, Columbia University. 

Russell Condran Hatz Instructor in Violin, Harmony, 

Band, Orchestra 
B.S. in Music Education, Lebanon Valley College 1937; Graduate 
study, Temple University, Juilliard Institute; A.M., Columbia 
University 1942. 



•Resigned, end of regular college year, 1943-44. 
**Dean of Women, 1943-44. 



16 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Elbert Dixon Haskins Instructor in Singing, Choral Conducting 

A.B., University of Michigan 1923; A.M., New York University 
1939; Graduate study with Bianca Randall, Paris, France, with 
Paul Althouse, New York City, and at Feagin School of Dramatic 
Art, New York City. 

Nancy Bowman Hatz Instructor in Harmony, Band Instruments 

B.S. in Music Education, Lebanon Valley College 1936; A.M. 
Columbia University 1941. 



ARMY AIR COEPS TEACHING STAFF 
MARCH, 1943 - MAY, 1944 

Russell Galt, Ph.D. Coordinator 

George F. Dunkelberger, Ph.D. History 

Augustus W. Ahl, Ph.D. History 

Arthur H. Wilson, Ph.D. English 

William A. Russ, Ph.D. History 

Russell W. Gilbert, Ph.D. English 

Lois M. Boe, Ph.D. English and Geography 

Amos A. Stagg, Jr., A.M. Physical Education 

Fisk W. S. Scudder, Ph.D. Physics 

John J. Houtz, Sc.D. Mathematics and Geography 

Harvey A. Heath, Ph.D. Geography and Mathematics 

Daniel I. Reitz, A.M. Geography and Mathematics 

George M. Robison, Ph.D. Mathematics and Physics 

Walter B. Kelly, A.M. English 

Lenora Allison, M. Ed. Geography 

E. Irene Shure, A.M. Medical Aid 

Frederick C. Stevens, A.M. History 

Russell C. Hatz, A.M. Geography 

Glenn L. Musser, M.S. Physics 

Frank Adams, A.B. History and Civil Air Regulations 

John Hoffman, A.B. Physics 

JAMES HALL, A.B. Physics 

Horace Kauffman, A.B. Physics 

Anna Mease, A.B. Mathematics and Physics 

Bertha M. Hein, R.N. Medical Aid 

Richard Henry Klein, LL.B. Civil Air Regulation* 



FACULTY COMMITTEES 



1944-1945 

Admission and Student Standing 

DuNKELBERGER, GaLT, GlLBERT, GRAHAM, RlISS, ScTTDDER, SHELDON, 

Ulrich, Wilson 
Catalogue and Curriculum 

DuNKELBERGER, GaLT, UlRICH 

Library 
Fisher, North, Russ, "Wilson 

Physical Education and Athletics 
Galt, Moyer,* G. M. Smith, Stagg, Witmer,* Yorty 

Public Events 
L. Allison, Gilbert, Linebaugh, Sheldon 

Publications 
Fisher, Reitz, Wilson, Yorty 

Religious Life 
Ahl, Fisher, Kretschmann, TJnangst 

Social Affairs 
Galt, Reitz, Sheldon, Si-iure, Stagg, Unangst, Wilson 

Teacher Education 

DuNKELBERGER, GaLT, ReITZ, RuSS, SHELDON, WlLSON 

Vocational Guidance 
Hjoutz, Russ, Sheldon, Ulrich, Wilson 



*Alumni Representative. 



PURPOSE AND OBJECTIVES 



The purpose of Susquehanna University is to provide for 
its students adequate educational facilities, and competent 
Christian scholars as teachers who shall create an environ- 
ment and an atmosphere conducive to the production of 
Christian character. The curricular objectives are the of- 
fering of liberal arts courses that shall issue in a deep, broad- 
basedj well-rounded culture, and of opportunity for technical 
and vocational education in the fields of business, commerce, 
and music. Susquehanna University desires to see in its 
students true scholarship interpenetrated with a genuine 
Christian faith. 



RECOGNITION BY ACCREDITING AGENCIES 

Susquehanna University is recognized officially as a 
four-year liberal arts college by the following accredit- 
ing agencies: 

1. The Middle States Association of Colleges 
and Secondary Schools. 

2. The Pennsylvania State Department of 
Public [nstruction and similar accrediting 
agencies of neighboring states. 

^ [uehanna University is also a member of the As- 
sociation of American Colleges and the American 
< louncil of Education. 



BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 



In its campus development and the addition of new buildings, Sus- 
quehanna University is following a carefully wrought-out plan. On 
the campus of more than sixty-two acres, there are at present sixteen 
brick buildings : 

Selinsgrove Hall was the first building on the campus. It was built 
in 1858 very largely through the generosity of the people of Selinsgrove 
and vicinity. During the days of Missionary Institute, from 1858 to 
1895, it was the only building on the campus, and contained a dormitory 
for men, classrooms, literary society halls, and a chapel. Selinsgrove 
Hall is a substantial three-story brick building. Today, the first floor 
accommodates the administrative offices, and the second and third floors 
serve as a dormitory for the men students. 

Seibert Memorial Hall is a commodious three-story brick building 
in the colonial style of architecture. It was erected in 1901-1902. On 
the first floor are located the reception hall, the social parlors, the chapel, 
and dining room. The second and third floors serve as the dormitory for 
the women students. In the basement are found the dispensary, the day 
students' room, the sorority rooms, and a large social room. The building 
was named in honor of Samuel Seibert, of Hagerstown, Maryland, by the 
provisions of whose will the University received $20,000. This munifi- 
cent gift from the Seibert Estate was made possible very largely through 
the efforts of Dr. S. W. Owen, of Hagerstown, Maryland, the President 
of the Board of Trustees at the time. The Moller three-manual pipe 
organ in the chapel was presented to the University by William A. 
Hassinger in memory of his wife, Mrs. Almeda M. Hassinger. 

Hassinger Memorial Hall is a modern brick fireproof dormitory for 
men. Dedicated June 13, 1921, it was erected substantially through the 
gifts of the family of Martin Luther Hassinger, a former director of the 
college. It has four floors, with a number of rooms arranged as suites. 
It is modern in its appointments. For the year 1944-45, Hassinger Hall 
has been completely renovated and is being used as a residence for 
women. 

Gustavus Adolphus Hall is a large building of red brick, containing 
lecture rooms, and the offices, classrooms, and laboratories of the Depart- 
ment of Business. This is the oldest building now used for classroom 
purposes, having been completed and dedicated on February 15, 1895. 
It was originally built to house the theological seminary, not now in 
existence, and contained at one time the college administrative offices, 
student rooms, and chapel. In 1928 it was remodeled to accommodate 
the Department of Business, and the administrative offices were moved 
to the first floor of Selinsgrove Hall. 

Steele Science Hall was completed and dedicated on June 10, 1913. 
It was built largely through the gifts of the Hon. Charles Steele, other 
directors of the Board, and friends of the college. It contains the chem- 



20 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

istry, physics, biology, and psychology laboratories, and a large amphi- 
theatre for laboratory demonstrations. This room contains a motion 
picture screen and projectors for both still and motion pictures. 

The Alumni Gymnasium. The present modern gymnasium was dedi- 
cated on June 3, 1935, and replaced an older building which had been 
destroyed by fire. The money for its construction was raised under the 
leadership of President G. Morris Smith through trustee, faculty, and 
alumni subscriptions, as well as from friends of the college. For full 
description of this building, see page 27. 

The Library, striking in its simplicity, was dedicated on June 8, 1928. 
It is the first unit of a larger library which is planned for the future. 

The Conservatory of Music. A three-story building, originally the 
home of Dr. Jonathan R. Dimm, a former president of the institution, 
was made over for conservatory use in 1921. Additions to it were built 
in 1925-26. It contains classrooms and individual practice rooms. 
Through the efforts of Mr. M. P. Moller, Sr., who was a member of the 
Board of Directors for twenty years, a Moller two-manual pipe organ 
was installed in the conservatory. 

The Cottage, located on the campus, serves as a girls' dormitory 
annex to Seibert Memorial Hall. 

Pine Lawn is the president's house. 

Four Duplex Faculty Residences. 

Central Heating Plant. 

Laundry. 

THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 

To supplement the instruction in the various courses, the univer- 
library, boused in a colonial, fire-proof building, erected in 1928, 
functions as a reference library of more than 22,800 volumes and 
nearly .'i.OOO volumes of bound magazines, to which additions are 
made constantly. The library is classified and arranged according 
to the Dewey Decimal system, and contains both supplementary 
material and an adequate collection of the standard reference tools. 

The library is open from 7:50 a. m. to 12 noon, 1 to 5 p. in., and 
7 to 10 p. in.. Monday through Friday; Saturday from 7:50 a. m. to 
12 noon, and from 1 to 3 p. m. 

-. excepl reference and those on the reserve shelves, may 
circulate for two-week periods. Reference hooks and magazines may 
not be taken from the library. Reserve books may be taken oul from 
1" p. in. to s a. in. and at other periods when the building is closed. 

The library receives regularly about 150 periodicals, both for 

lastic and recreational reading, three daily newspapers, Barron's 
Financial Weekly, two local weekly newspapers, the standard index 
many other college publications. The library contains 
also the Will Music collection, a bequesl of several thousand books 
of value to music students. It contains also about six hundred 
volume, of biography and about eleven hundred ?olum< - of fiction. 

Freshmen are given ten hours of instruction in the basic tools 
of the library and the technique of using them through independent 
rch. 



I 









THE LIBRARY 



STUDENT INTEREST 



RELIGIOUS LIFE 

Education without religion is incomplete. Susquehanna stands for 
the steady and consistent cultivation of the religious life. Each 
student is required to take the credit courses in religion as provided 
in the curriculum, and to avail himself of the opportunities offered 
for spiritual development. He is expected to attend chapel and 
church regularly. Any student who persistently refuses to accom- 
modate himself to these opportunities for spiritual development may 
be asked to withdraw from the college. 

Open to all students, the Student Christian Association carries 
on a voluntary religious program throughout the year. By the 
example of their own lives, members seek to lead others to the full 
expression of their personalities and, through friendship, to acquaint 
new students with the ideals of college life. 

Mid-week devotional services and Sunday vespers are conducted 
under the auspices of the Student Christian Association. 

SOCIAL LIFE 

Susquehanna University, being a coeducational institution, seeks 
to supply the opportunity of a normal, natural development amid 
refined and cultural surroundings. The social life is under the 
control of a faculty committee. All social events, with chaperons 
specifically named, must receive the approval of the faculty social 
committee before being carried out. A financial budget for each 
event must be submitted in advance for approval by the social com- 
mittee before any contracts may be made. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND ACTIVITIES 

Student organizations may be formed by having their constitu- 
tions and by-laws approved in advance by the administration and 
faculty. All changes in the existing constitution and by-laws must 
also be approved. All college organizations (except those maintain- 
ing dormitories or dining halls) which collect dues or assessments or 
raise money otherwise for any purpose are required to keep their 
funds on deposit with the office of the bursar, thus securing a com- 
plete and accurate accounting for all funds received and spent. This 



22 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

procedure is not designed to relieve the organization officers of any 
responsibility. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

Student government operates on the campus of Susquehanna 
University through six organizations: the Men's Student Council, 
the Women's Cooperative Council, the Women's Athletic Association, 
the Entersorority Council, the Fraternity Senate, and the Proctors' 
Committee for the men's dormitory. 

In all of these organizations efforts are made to initiate student 
representatives into the problems of democratic group control. There 
is vested in these organizations as much direction of campus affairs 
as students are normally able to carry successfully. These organiza- 
tions provide a practice ground for cooperation between the student 
body and the administration, which must carry the final legal respon- 
sibility for the policies of the institution. 

The form of student government followed in most of these organ- 
izations is that of a relatively large number of student representa- 
working with one faculty adviser. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

Tin: Student Handbook serves as a guide and reference book 
to incoming students and especially to freshmen. It is published 
mainly through the Student Christian Association. 

Tin; Si sqi iiiaxxa is the weekly, undergraduate newspaper and 
offers any student with the desire to see himself (herself) in print a 
good chance to take part in the various phases of journalism: head- 
line writing, newspaper make-up, straight news, features, sports, 
general reporting, and editing. Academic credit is optional. 

The Lanthoen is issued annually by members of the junior 
class. 1' contains a record of college life portrayed by pictures, 
prose, and poetry. 

ATHLETICS 

Amateur standards are maintained in football, field hockey, 

basket ball, track, baseball, and tenuis, in each of these activities, 

- are maintained and a healthy spiril prevails. Team members 

and representatives command respeel on every field for manliness, 

: sportsmanship, and athletic performance. Letters are awarded 

embers of varsity teams under rules of the athletic eommi 

and suitable letter- or insignia of recognition are awarded to buc- 



"i- competitors in minor and intra-mural -ports and 
ities. The Varsity "S" club is an organization of men who 

von the "S" in athleti. 

letic Association has a- in purpose the pro- 



STUDENT INTEREST 23 

motion of women's athletics, sports, and activities. It stimulates 
interest in physical efficiency and maintenance of ideals and good 
sportsmanship. 

NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETIES 

Tau Kappa Alpha is a national honorary forensic fraternity, 
founded for the purpose of giving recognition to those who have 
attained high honors in the field of public speaking and debating. 
The Susquehanna chapter, chartered in 1930, is one of more than a 
hundred chapters in the United States. 

Pi Gamma Mu is a national social science honor society consist- 
ing of 130 chapters with a membership of over 19,000, established to 
encourage and reward undergraduate interest in the social studies. 
The Pennsylvania Gamma Chapter was established in 1927 and has 
a membership of 185, including members of the faculty, alumni, and 
undergraduates. Members are selected on the following basis : 
evidence of special interest in social studies, at least twenty semester 
hours in the social studies, a "B" average in all social studies, a high 
scholastic standing, and good character. 

Sigma Alpha Iota Fraternity is a national music fraternity 
for women. The Susquehanna chapter, chartered in 1903, is one of 
the sixty-four chapters in the United States. Its purpose is to pro- 
mote high standards of professional scholarship, ethics, and culture, 
and to bring about a closer relationship among those pursuing some 
phase of music as a profession. 

Alpha Psi Omega is a national dramatic fraternity consisting 
of 198 chapters, organized for the purpose of providing an honor 
society for those doing a high standard of work in dramatics and 
incidentally, through the expansion of Alpha Psi Omega among the 
colleges of the United States and Canada, providing a wider fellow- 
ship for those in the college theatre. The Susquehanna chapter, 
Theta Phi, was chartered in 1941. 

SPECIAL INTEREST CLUBS 

Students with similar interests meet in organizations — usually 
once a month — and at such times programs, concerts, tours, or 
special occasions are arranged and approved. 

The Biemic Society is maintained to further the interests of 
students in biology, chemistry, and physics, and presents programs 
prepared by members or by visitors, qualified on scientific subjects. 

Phi Kappa is an organization of students who are interested in 
the cultivation of a proper appreciation of the Greek language and 
culture. At their meetings, papers prepared by the members are 
presented, and a social hour usually follows. 



24 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

The Pre-Theological Club is an organization of students who 
are preparing to enter the study of the Christian ministry. Its aim 
is to foster the spiritual life on the campus. Faculty members and 
ministers are frequently invited to speak to the group. 

The Business Society provides a means to discuss matters of 
common interest for students of finance, management, accounting, 
marketing, economics, teaching of commercial subjects, and related 
fields. 

The musical organizations are the University Chorus. Sym- 
phonic Society, and the Bands. Each of these organizations holds 
regular practice periods and rehearsals, and sponsors or gives public 
performances. Each group is encouraged and supported by the 
Conservatory of Music. 

SOCIAL FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES 

There are three social fraternities for men : Bond and Key, 
Theta Chi (Beta Omega chapter), and Phi Mu Delta (Mu Alpha 
chapter). Each has a home near the campus. 

There are two social sororities for women : Kappa Delta Phi and 
Omega Delta Sigma. 

These organizations have been granted certain privileges by the 
Board of Directors. Freshmen are , discouraged from becoming 
pledged to a fraternity or sorority during the first semester rushing 
season if their mid-semester grades are below average. 

Freshmen pledges will be permitted to become active members of 
a fraternity or sorority in May of the freshman year provided their 
scholastic standing is satisfactory. 

A student who has completed one full year's work in another 
college and is of sophomore standing may join a fraternity or sorori- 
ty at the close of the first semester at Susquehanna University, pro- 
vided the student's conduct has been satisfactory and class standing 
has been maintained. 

DISCIPLINE 

It is assumed that all students have come to college voluntarily 
for serious study and that they will cheerfully adjust themselves to 
its ideals and regulations. The college reserves the right to require 
the withdrawal of students whose scholarship is unsatisfactory, and 
of those who for any other reason are regarded as not in accord with 
the ideals and standards which the college seeks to maintain. 

A student suspended for misdemeanors loses all credit for work 
done during the semester. In any case of reinstatement, the student 
will be on probation for one semester. 

Intoxicating liquors shall not be allowed in students' rooms or 



STUDENT INTEREST 25 

fraternity houses. The detection of liquors in any student's room, 
on his person or on his breath, will be held sufficient evidence to 
warrant his suspension from college. 

Drinking of intoxicating liquors, gambling, cheating, or similar 
breaches of discipline may be punished by suspension or dismissal 
from college. 

PRIZES 

1. The Stine Mathematical Prize — Through an endowment made 
by the Rev. H. M. Stine, Ph.D., D.D., of Harrisburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, there is annually provided a prize of fifteen dollars to be 
awarded to a member of the sophomore class who has the highest 
average in the study of mathematics during the freshman and 
sophomore years. The conditions under which the prizes will 
be conferred shall be subject to the regulations of the faculty. 

2. Sigma Alpha Iota National Fraternity Prize — A certificate 
is awarded by the Sigma Alpha Iota Fraternity to its senior girl 
having the highest average for four years in the music course. 

3. Omega Delta Sigma Sorority Prize — A cash prize is awarded 
by the Omega Delta Sigma Sorority to its senior girl having the 
highest academic average for her college career. 

4. Kappa Delta Phi Sorority Prize — A cash prize is awarded 
by the Kappa Delta Phi Sorority to its senior girl having the 
highest academic average for her college career. 

5. The Charles E. Covert Memorial Prize — By a bequest of 
$500.00 from the Alberta S. Covert estate, the Charles E. Covert 
memorial prize has been established to be awarded to a member 
of the junior class deemed to have exercised the most wholesome 
influence during his first three years. Elements of character, 
scholarship, attitude, and leadership will receive major consid- 
eration in awarding this prize. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

1. The One-Half Scholarship, endowed by Mr. DeWitt Bodine, 
of Hughesville, Pennsylvania, in the amount of $500. The 
annual interest of this sum as a scholarship is under the direc- 
tion of the Council of the Lutheran Church at Hughesville, 
Pennsylvania. 

2. The Brownmiller Scholarship, of $1,000, established by Rever- 
end E. S. Brownmiller, D.D., and his son, Reverend M. Luther 
Brownmiller, A.B., of Reading, Pennsylvania. The annual 
interest of this sum is under the direction of the donors. 



26 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

3. The Bateman One-Half Scholarship, of $500, established by 
Reverend S. E. Bateman, M.D., ScD., of Atlantic City, New 
Jersey, for the benefit of the Susquehanna Synod. 

4. The Huyett Scholarship, established by Mr. E. M. Huyett, 
of Centre Hall, Pennsylvania, of $1000, to be given under the 
direction of the president of the university. 

5. The Bodine Scholarship, of $1000, established by Mrs. Emma 
B. Bodine, of Hughesville, Pennsylvania, widow of DeWitt 
Bodine, in memory of her husband, who was a director of the 
university. i 

6. The Duck Scholarship, in the amount of $1000, established by 
Mr. Henry Duck, of Millheim, Pennsylvania, in memory of his 
wife. 

7. The Keiser Scholarship, in the amount of $1000, established 
by Mr. John A. Keiser, of West Milton, Pennsylvania, in mem- 
ory of his wife. 

8. The Wieand Scholarship, in the amount of $1000, established 
by Reverend W. R. Wieand, D.D., of Altoona, Pennsylvania, in 
grateful remembrance of what Missionary Institute, now Sus- 
quehanna University, did for him in earlier years. 

9. The Mary L. Steele Scholarship, in the amount of $5000. 
established by Honorable Charles Steele, of Northumberland, 
Pennsylvania. The income is to be used for the education of 
worthy students at Susquehanna University subject to nomina- 
tion by the donor's family. 

10. The Lena Brockmeyer Scholarship, in the amount of $1000, 
established by check received from Reverend G. L. Rankin, then 
treasurer of Pittsburgh Synod, Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania. 

11. The M. P. Moller Scholarship, in the amount of $5000. estab- 
lished by Mr. M. P. Moller, of Hagerstown, Maryland. 

12. Class Gift Scholarship — Class gifts from the gradua 
classes of 1914, 1930, 1931, and 1932 have made possible the 
establishment of a fund, the income from which makes available 
a scholarship annually for a person who has attained a high 
scholastic rank. 

13. Women's Aixii.iakv Scholabship, in the amount of $1000, es- 
tablished by the Women's Auxiliary of Susquehanna University. 

14. The William II. Mjlleb Scholarship, established by William 

If. .Miller, of Stoystown, Pennsylvania, in the amounl of $900. 
T e annual interest on tlii- sum is a scholarship under the direc- 
tion of the administration of the University for the education of 
worthy young men preparing for the gospel ministry. 



STUDENT INTEREST 27 

15. The Misses Amanda and Elizabeth Smith Scholarship, en- 
dowed in the amount of $1000, the income to be available for 
worthy students for the ministry. 

16. The Lillian V. Johanson Smith Scholarship, established in 
1943 by her sister, Miss A. E. Johanson, her brother, Dr. A. M. 
Johanson, and her husband, Dr. G. Morris Smith. The amount 
of the endowment is $1200, the interest from which is to be 
awarded from year to year to that needy student who, in the 
judgment of the scholarship committee, shows the marks of 
scholarly achievement coupled with dedication to the Christian 
spirit. 

HEALTH SEKVICE 

The success of a student in college and in later life depends 
largely upon physical fitness and reserve energy, both of which are 
fundamental to an active mind and capacity for hard and efficient 
work. The student is constantly reminded of the importance of good 
health and is urged to develop habits that lead to wise use of leisure 
time, both while in college and after graduation. 

Health activities, physical education, and intercollegiate and 
intra-mural sports are integrated into a health program which is 
required of all students. The health service embraces the following 
activities : physical examination of all students ; health supervision 
and inspection of dormitories, dining halls, kitchen, wash rooms, 
dressing rooms, and showers; cooperation Avith the student's family 
physician; development of a scientific attitude toward the building 
of good health, including diet, physical exercises, control of the 
emotions, and mental hygiene. The student is taught to build a 
social and recreational program to develop qualities of cooperation, 
fair play, perseverance, self-control, and sportsmanship. The col- 
lege operates a dispensary under the supervision of a registered 
nurse, who is resident in Seibert Hall. Her services are available to 
all students in case of illness and for treatment of minor injuries. 
When the services of a physician are needed they may be obtained 
at a minimum cost. The health program is carried on largely in 
connection with the athletic fields, recreational facilities, and the 
gymnasium. 

The university field is made up of two gridirons, a soccer field, a 
baseball field, a nine-hole golf course, four tennis courts for men, and 
an excellent quarter-mile track with a 220-yard straightaway. On 
the opposite side of the gymnasium is the women's athletic field, 
including the hockey field, a soccer field, an archery range, and five 
tennis courts. Parts of the fields are flooded during the winter 
months to provide for skating and ice hockey. 

The alumni gymnasium is 110 feet long and 65 feet wide. The 
first floor contains locker rooms, shower rooms, play rooms, and 



28 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

separate equipment facilities for men and women. The second floor, 
comprising the gymnasium proper, is large enough to permit two 
games of basketball to be played simultaneously. There are facilities 
for indoor baseball, volleyball, tennis, handball, badminton, and gym- 
nastic activities. At the north end of the building are separate 
offices for the directors of athletics. 

Numerous social functions and exhibitions are held in the gym- 
nasium, which has a seating capacity of more than six hundred. 

OPPORTUNITIES IN MUSIC AND ART 

Opportunities for hearing interpretations of the great masters 
are made available to the student body, faculty, and friends. In- 
creased opportunities will be offered at a nominal cost as the demand 
warrants. 

Students in the conservatory of music give recitals prepared under 
the supervision of the members of the conservatory faculty. Students 
who are not sufficiently advanced to participate in the evening 
recitals are given experience in public performances in a recital class. 

HOUSING AND BOARDING FACILITIES 

All resident freshmen and sophomores are required to room in the 
college residences on the campus and board in the college dining hall. 

Any resident junior, senior or special student desiring to room in a 
fraternity house must first have written permission of the business 
manager. No students shall room or board at hotels, restaurants, or 
public boarding houses. Rooms are rented for the full college year 
and no change is permitted except through a written request to 
and approval of the business manager. 

No deductions will be made from the charges for board unless the 
student applying for the same has been unavoidably absent for a 
period of at least two weeks. The college reserves the right to close 
all residences as well as the dining room at stated times, especially 
during vacation periods. 

Rooms in the residences are furnished with beds, springs, mat- 
tresses, wardrobes, chairs and tables. Each student must come sup- 
plied with sheets, blankets, pillows, pillow caes, rugs, towels, pic- 
tures, and articles of decoration. It is suggested that each student 
bring a good electric study lamp. The choosing of room decorations 
such as curtains, especially where the student is rooming in a double 
or suite of rooms, should not be made until the roommat" is consulted. 

Any student wilfully destroying or defacing college property will 
be required to pay the cost of replacement or repair and will be 
subject also to a fine or dismissal from the institution. 

It is assumed that all students contracting for room and board 
in the college residences accept the responsibility of abiding by the 
rules and regulations. 



STUDENT INTEREST 29 

The college does not carry insurance on personal property of 
faculty members or students and is not responsible for any loss of 
property. 

Special electric appliances such as heaters, irons, high-powered 
lamps, etc., are not permitted except by arrangement with the bursar 
to cover cost of current consumed. An extra charge of $2.50 per 
semester is made for a radio in a student's room. 

Information concerning vacant rooms will be sent on application. 
It is recommended that in making application for a room, at least 
two selections be given in the order of preference. Application for 
a room must be accompanied by a deposit of ten dollars. The fee is 
applied on the bill for the first semester. 

Room assignments are made to returning students in April. The 
rooms are rented for the entire year, but the college reserves the 
right to change any room assignment when it deems advisable. The 
college also reserves the right to inspect the rooms when it sees fit to 
do so. 

WORKING POSITIONS AND SCHOLARSHIP GRANTS 

Opportunities for working positions on the campus are open alike 
to men and women students. The number of positions open each 
year is variable. Opportunity for student employment is contingent 
upon the quality of the academic record maintained. Any student 
deserving such an opportunity should make application to the busi- 
ness manager before May 1. 

Scholarship grants are awarded on the basis of mental ability, 
academic achievement, general deportment, and financial needs. 
They will not be renewed when the holder falls below an academic 
average of C for the school year. These grants will be reduced or 
withdrawn for unsatisfactory deportment or for an unsatisfactory 
academic record. 

BOOK STORE 

Text books and school supplies may be purchased at the Book 
Store. Students must pay directly to the store for all articles when 
purchased. Student mail is distributed from lock boxes at this store. 
The store is located at the south end of the first floor of Selinsgrove 
Hall. 

EXCLUSION FROM THE UNIVERSITY 

The Administration reserves the right to exclude at any time 
students whose conduct or academic standing it regards as undesir- 
able, and without assigning any further reason therefor; in such 
cases the fees due or which may have been paid in advance to the 
institution will not be remitted or refunded, in whole or in part, and 
neither the institution nor any of its officers shall be under any 
liability whatsoever for such exclusion. 



SPECIAL EVENTS 



To broaden and enrich the life at Susquehanna, special speakers, 
artists, and groups appear from time to time. Since the last catalogue 
was published, the following have been heard : 



1943 

February 10 
February 14 
February 20 

February 24 

March 4 
March 11 

March 19 
April 4 

May 21 

May 22 

September 17 
October 4 
November 3 
November 11 

November 16 



1944 

January 7 
March 7 
April 10 
April 28 
May 9 

May 11 
May 26 
May 26 

May 27 

September 21 

October 14 
November 9 



Belgian Piano-String Quartet 

Rev. Lewis E. Bowers, missionary from Liberia 

Mrs. Katherine Miller, secretary, Pennsylvania State 

Nurses Association 
Miss Mildred Winston, travelling secretary, Board of 

Education, United Lutheran Church in America 
Zena Gemmalo, clarinetist 
Dr. William Stidger, author and Methodist pastor, New 

York City 
Rev. F. O. Feller, Methodist pastor, Knoxville, Tenn. 
Rev. Maurice R. Gortner, pastor, St. Paul's Lutheran 

Church, Lansdowne, Pennsylvania 
Dr. John L. Deaton, pastor, Christ Lutheran Church, 

Baltimore, Maryland, baccalaureate address 
Dr. Paul Swain Havens, president of Wilson College, 

commencement address 
Gen. Uzal G. Ent, U. S. Army Air Corps 
Col. Thomas M. Tchou, Chinese philosopher 
Stell Anderson, pianist 
Dr. George Menke, secretary of the Student Christian 

Movement 
Mr. Emerson Reck, public relations specialist, Colgate 
University 



Miss Sonia Grodke, German refugee, Bennington College 
Jean Carlton, soprano, and William Gephart, baritone 
Miss Catherine Stirewalt, missionary from China 
Dr. Pasupuleti Krishnayya, lecturer on India 
Dr. Frederick Brush, physician and author, White 

Plains, New York 
Miss Christie Zimmerman, missionary from India 
Mr. Conrad Richter and Mr. Carl Carmer, authors 
Dr. Charles Foelsch, president, Maywood Theological 

Seminary, Chicago, Illinois, baccalaureate sermon 
Dr. Charles C. Ellis, president emeritus, Juniata College, 

Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, commencement address 
Rev. Carl Honeycutt, pastor, Zion Lutheran Church, 

Sunbury, Pennsylvania 
Mr. Erie Shobert, II, physicist 
Miss Maxine Stellman, soprano, Metropolitan Opera 

Association 



EXPENSES 



KESIDENT STUDENTS 

The tuition charge to resident students is $10.00 per semester hour. 
The total costs for the year, including tuition, board, room rent, and 
all other expenses except special fees, are approximately as follows, 
depending upon choice of room: 

Men PER YEAR 

Tuition ($10 per semester hour) 

Liberal Arts (32 hrs. for the year) $320.00 

Activities Fee 20.00 

Board 225.00 

Books (estimated) 15.00 

Damage Deposit 5.00 

Average Room Rent for Men 80.00 

Rates of Rooms: Hassinger Hall $90.00 

Selinsgrove Hall 70.00 

Approximate cost for year $665.00 



Women 

Tuition ($10 per semester hour) 

Liberal Arts (32 hrs. for the year) $320.00 

Activities Fee 20.00 

Board 225.00 

Books (estimated) 15.00 

Damage Deposit 5.00 

Average Room Rent for Women 105.00 

Rates of Rooms: Seibert Hall 

(Double Suite— Bath) ___ $100.00 
(Double— Without Bath) _ 90.00 

(Single— Bath) 120.00 

(Single— Without Bath) _ 100.00 



Approximate cost for year $690.00 

The tuition general expenses for the Music Education Course is 
$375.00 a year. For further details see page 98. 

DAY STUDENTS 

The tuition charge to day students is $10.00 per semester hour. 
Special fees are extra. 



32 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

SPECIAL FEES 

A damage deposit of $5 is required of all students. Damage to 
property will be charged against this fee. The remainder will be 
returned to the student at the end of school year. Wherever possible 
damage will be charged directly to the person responsible for 
causing it. 

Alumni Association life membership, senior year, 

second semester $5.00 

Botany, zoology, comparative anatomy, bacteriology 

embryology and histology 4.00 per semester 

Change of registration 1.00 per semester 

Chemistry, all courses 6.00 per semester 

Commercial education 15, 16, 25, 26, 32 5.00 per semester 

Experimental physics 6.00 per semester 

General Psychology 2.50 per semester 

Surveying 3.00 per semester 

Graduation fee, senior year, second semester 8.00 

Observation and practice teaching, senior year 2.50 per credit 

Transcript of record (after first copy) 1.00 

The special fees for each semester must be paid in advance or at the 
time of registration. 

PAYMENT OF BILLS 

To facilitate matriculation it is requested that a check covering; 
all fees due ;it the beginning of the session be sent to the Bursar in 
advance of the arrival of the student. Checks should be made pay- 
able to Susquehanna University. No student is registered until his 
bill has been settled in the Bursar's office. 

TRANSCRIPTS AND GRADUATION 

Satisfactory settlement of all bills and fees is required before 
semester grades or an honorable dismissal can be granted and trans- 
cript of grades released. No student will be graduated until all final 
obligations to the college, class publications, organizations and clubs 
are settled. This includes class assessments voted by a majority of 
a class in a regularly called meeting. 

REFUNDS 

No fee will be refunded unless serious illness or other cause 
entirely beyond the control of the student compels withdrawal from 
the college. Students dismissed for unsatisfactory work or for in- 
fringement of college rules are allowed no refunds. There will be 
no refund for courses dropped two weeks after registration day. 



PERSONAL ATTENTION FOR THE 
INDIVIDUAL STUDENT 



Susquehanna has always maintained a Faculty large enough to give 
personal attention to each individual student. For many years, 
there has been the generous ratio of one professor for every ten 
students. It has, therefore, been possible to provide close personal 
attention and counselling. 

The transition from high school to college is a difficult one. Col- 
lege work is heavier and more exacting. It requires more time for 
study than the average high school senior has previously found 
necessary. In addition, college frshmen are living away from home, 
and the problems of adjusting their lives to new surroundings and 
new people are difficult and perplexing. So great are the difficulties 
of this transition stage that the number of students who fail because 
of them during the first two years of college is exceedingly high. 
For many students, the warm, friendly, personal atmosphere of the 
Susquehanna campus has meant success in solving these problems, 
whereas the cold, impersonal atmosphere of many huge institutions 
would have meant failure. 

Susquehanna's policy z-s to provide personal attention for those 
who need it. Students who are capable of directing their own col- 
lege studies and affairs successfully are not required to have faculty 
members counsel and guide them. Students learn by doing, and for 
those who do well nothing is so retarding as unnecessary supervision. 

This does not mean that students are left to do as they please. 
Personal supervision for all naturally results from an adequate 
Faculty, small classes, and a self-contained campus located on the 
outskirts of a college town of 3,000 persons. But in addition to this 
naturally favorable situation, the following specific program is the 
heart of Susquehanna's personalized education for those who need it : 

(1) All freshmen are given placement tests on entering the college, 
the results of which, together with their high school records, guide the 
Administration in its immediate handling of the students. 

If their records show that they have done good work and are poten- 
tially capable of continuing to do good work, they are allowed to carry 
on their college programs with a minimum of guidance. This is supplied 
by those professors in the subject-matter fields of their choice, who 
assist them in making out their semester schedules of studies. They are 
also under the close supervision of their classroom instructors, the dean 
of women, and the dean of the college. 



34 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

If their records show that they are not strong students, they are 
assigned to a faculty adviser, who talks over their records with them, 
discusses study habits, and helps make out study schedules. In addition, 
they are sent to the Proctored Study Period, conducted by faculty mem- 
bers every evening except Saturday and Sunday. Here weak students 
find a place and a regular time most favorable for efficient study. Thus, 
by prompt action, students are prevented from getting off to a bad start. 

(2) If, at any marking period, students fail to make the minimum 
passing standard, they are assigned to a faculty adviser (if they do not 
already have one) and are sent to the Proctored Study Period. 

(3) In addition to the above, the dean of women and the dean of 
the college give special attention to failing students by holding personal 
inteiwiews with them and keeping their parents informed of the progress 
of each case. 

(4) At the end of each semester the complete records of failing 
students are reviewed by a faculty committee representing the main fields 
of study. At this review, reports from the faculty advisers are read 
and the strength and weakness of the students is evaluated. For those 
students who have possibilities of improvement, the committee prescribes 
programs of studies, regulates their extra-curricular activities, notifies 
the parents of the difficulties, and calls the attention of professors to 
these cases. 

By such specific actions does Susquehanna make failure in college a 
difficult thing and by such practical procedure does it make individualized 
education a reality. 



EDUCATIONAL AND VOCATIONAL 
GUIDANCE 



During the Orientation Program each new student is given a series 
of college aptitude and placement tests. An opportunity is given each 
student to confer with a member of the teaching staff to outline the 
work of the freshman year. 

The Dean maintains a central personnel file in which all the 
students' records from various sources are collected. These are used 
to aid the student in coming to an intelligent adjustment to college 
life. 

Kot later than the end of the sophomore year each candidate for 
the B.A. degree is required to select some field in which he expects 
to concentrate his work. This is expressed in a major and a sup- 
porting minor. When the selection of a major has been made, the 
professor at the head of that department becomes the student's 
adviser and replaces the general adviser of the freshman and sopho- 
more years. The major adviser in consultation with the student 
completes an outline of the student's program of study for the 
remainder of his college course. These major advisers work in con- 
junction with the professional advisers who are acquainted with the 
specific requirements of a particular profession. 

Vocational planning is furthered by : 

1. Encouraging the student to secure accurate information about the 

vocation in which he is interested and by building up a body of 
qualifications to be successful in the occupation. 

2. Giving of vocational interest tests to students who believe they 

possess special interests or abilities, or to those who are 
undecided. 

3. Maintaining a series of references in the library on a special shelf 

where students may get acquainted with the literature about the 
different professions. 

4. Informing students who plan to enter the professions or pursue 

further study, on such matters as schools, admissions, costs, 
scholarships, and courses. The following professional advisers 
have been designated for this purpose : 



36 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Profession or Occupation Advisers 

Accounting Graham 

Armed Services Galt 

Business Graham 

Chemistry or Chemical Engineering Fisher, Houtz 

Commercial Education Reitz 

Dentistry Scudder 

Diplomatic or Government Service Russ 

Teaching Dunkelberger 

Journalism Wilson 

Law Russ 

Library Service North 

Medical Professions and Nursing Fisher, Scudder, Hein 

Ministry and Religious Education President Smith 

Music Sheldon 

Psychology Dunkelberger 

Pharmacy and Manufacturing Chemistry Fisher 

Physics Robison 

Radio and Aviation Robison 

Secretarial Allison, L. 

During the school year specialists are secured to speak to groups 
of students interested in the various professions. These speakers 
who make clear the needs of the occupation which they represent are 
selected for their training, experience, and ability. 



THE APPOINTMENT BUREAU 

The College maintains an Appointment Bureau for the benefit of 
graduating seniors and alumni. This service is given free of charge. 
Positions are not definitely guaranteed, but a large percentage of 
students have been placed through Appointment Bureau contacts. 
In the past it has been primarily a placement agency for those 
entering the teaching profession, but for the past three years, definite 
work has been done to widen the Bureau's scope, and to secure con- 
tacts with private firms, large corporations, and State and Federal 
Civil Service. 

Typical positions which it has been called upon to fill include 
radio research, aircraft engineering, Army and Navy aviation, re- 
search chemistry; high school principalships, Y. TV. C. A. secretary- 
ships, psychiatric nursing, credit investigation, medical secretaryships, 
and high school teaching in liberal arts, commercial, and music fields. 



PREPARATION FOR A CAREER 



A college education is intended to enrich the student's cultural 
life and to prepare him to earn his living in a worthy profession. 
In many professions a rich cultural foundation, or general education, 
is the basis for later professional specialization. Susquehanna's 
curricula offer a wide variety of vocational choices. 

The following outlines of courses leading to vocations are sug- 
gestive. While some subjects are of necessity required for a par- 
ticular profession, the Administration permits as much flexibility 
as possible after basic requirements are met. 

ACCOUNTING 

A complete course in this field is offered at Susquehanna. Those 
who are interested in becoming certified public accountants in Penn- 
sylvania must be graduates of a recognized college, and have three 
years of satisfactory experience, two of which must be in the office of 
a certified public accountant. This course is also registered by the 
New York State Board of Regents for training in this field. An 
outline of the curriculum is found under Business Administration. 

BACTERIOLOGY (Laboratory Technician) 

A new profession for women has opened up in the general field 
of Bacteriology, in which specialized training leads to the career of 
laboratory technician in doctors' laboratories, hospitals and public 
health service. A laboratory technician is trained to perform the 
various chemical, microscopic and bacteriological tests used in the 
diagnosis and treatment of disease. The course consists of two 
parts: (1) a minimum of two years in college, followed by (2) a full 
year of practical work in an accredited hospital. The length of the 
college work varies, some hospitals demanding a full four-year col- 
lege course before permitting the student to enter for the year of 
practical work. Susquehanna has successfully prepared students 
for both the minimum and maximum requirements, and the course 
as outlined meets the pre-professional requirements of the Registry 
of !Medical Technologists. The suggested course of study is as 
follows : 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

History of Western Culture 3 3 



38 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

First Second 

Freshman Year (Continued) Semester Semester 

Foreign Language 3 3 

General Chemistry 3 3 

Introduction to College Mathematics 3 3 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Bible 2 2 

Zoology 3 3 

American History 3 3 

Qualitative Analysis 3 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

Junior Year 

Comparative Anatomy 3 3 

General Psychology 3 

Applied Psychology 3 

Histology 3 3 

Organic Chemistry 4 4 

Evidences 2 

Ethics 2 

Bacteriology 3 

Heredity 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

Senior Year 

Embryology 3 1 

Physiology 3 

Quantitative Chemistry 3 3 

Introductory Physics 4 4 

Electives 6 5 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

For many years Susquehanna has been offering specialized train- 
ing for those young men and women who desire to enter business as 
a vocation. There are opportunities for graduates of this course to 
become accountants, salesmen, bankers, advertising men, statisticians, 
real estate and insurance specialists, and business analysts. There 
are opportunities in government service for those with a major in 
economics. The course is well balanced between practical Bubjecta 
and those basic studies which introduce the student to the more com- 
plicated problems of the business world. 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Commercial and Economic Geography 3 3 

Commercial Mathematics 3 

Elementary Accounting 3 



PREPARATION FOR A CAREER 39 

First Second 

Freshman Year (Continued) Semester Semester 

Science Survey 3 3 

Industrial Development 3 

Business Principles 3 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 

Business English 3 

Bible 2 2 

Intermediate Accounting 3 3 

Economics 3 3 

American History or Sociology 3 3 

Business Law 3 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

Junior and Senior Years 

General Psychology 3 

Evidences and Ethics 4 

American Government 6 

Mathematics of Finance 3 

Advanced Business Law 3 

Machine Accounting 3 

Industrial Management 3 

Twelve hours from the following: 

Cost Accounting 3 

Advanced Accounting 6 

Auditing 3 

Federal Tax Accounting 3 

Salesmanship 3 

Business English 3 

Consumer Economics 3 

Labor Problems 3 

Insurance 3 

Public Finance 3 

Money and Banking 3 

Corporation Finance 6 

Marketing 3 

Government and Business 3 

Seminar 3 

Electives (to be chosen in consultation with the head 



of the department) 



CHEMISTRY 



For those students who wish to make chemistry (other than 
teaching chemistry) their life-work, the following course is sug- 
gested : 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Foreign Language (German recommended) 3 3 

History of Western Culture 3 3 



40 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

First Second 

Freshman Year (Continued) Semester Semester 

Introduction to College Mathematics 3 3 

Genera] Chemistry 3 3 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 3 

Language 3 3 

American History 3 3 

Qualitative Analysis 3 or 4 3 or 4 

Analytic Geometry and Calculus 4 4 

Physical Education 1 1 

Junior Year 

General Psychology 3 

Applied Psychology 3 

Organic Chemistry 4 4 

Introductory Physics 4 4 

Bible 2 2 

Electives 4 4 

Physical Education 1 1 

Senior Year 

Physical Chemistry 4 4 

Quantitative Analysis 4 4 

Physics (advanced elective) 3 3 

Evidences 2 

Ethics 2 

Elective 3 3 

HIGH SCHOOL TEACHING 

Susquehanna has had an outstanding record in the training of 
successful high school teachers and administrators. Her graduates 
in large numbers are serving as District Superintendents, County 
Superintendents, and Principals. Training is offered in Secondary 
Education, Commercial Education and Music Education. 

Eighteen hours in the field of Education are required for cer- 
tification in Pennsylvania.* These must include Introduction to 
Teaching, 3 hours; Educational Psychology, 3 bonis; Practice 
Teaching, 6 hours; and 6 hours of electives in Education. Susque- 
hanna requires that one of these electives be a course in the Tech- 
niques of Teaching, 3 hours.** 

In Secondary Education, majors are offered in English, French, 
German, Latin, History, Mathematics, Chemistry, Physics and 
Biology. In addition to the eighteen prescribed hours of Kdiication, 

*For New Jersey and New York requirements see p. 73. 

**A recent announcement of the Department of Public Instruction states that after 
September 1, 1943, all candidates for a permanent college certificate must present a basic 
course in American and Pennsylvania History, and that after September 1, 1944 all 
candidates for a temporary college certificate must fulfill this requirement. 



PREPARATION FOR A CAREER 41 

the State requires twenty-four hours in the first teaching field, and 
eighteen hours in each additional field, for certification. However, 
the State gives certification to teach the Social Studies, (namely, His- 
tory, Civics, Problems of Democracy, Economics, and Sociology) by 
taking 9 hours of History and 3 hours each of Political Science, 
Economics, and Sociology, totalling eighteen hours. Certification is 
also given to teach Science (namely, Physics, Chemistry, Biology, 
and General Science) by taking 9 hours of Physical Science, divided 
into 6 hours of Chemistry and 3 hours of Physics (or vice versa), 
and 9 hours of Biological Science, divided into 6 hours of Zoology, 
and 3 hours of Botany (or vice versa). 

SECONDARY EDUCATION 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 3 

History of Western Culture 3 3 

Bible 2 2 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 3 

American History 3 3 

General Psychology 3 

Educational Psychology 3 

Evidences 2 

Ethics 2 

Physical Education 1 1 

The first two years for those who plan to specialize in Mathe- 
matics or Science will differ slightly from the above according to the 
specific major requirements found under course descriptions for each 
major field. 

The last two years in the Liberal Arts fields will be planned in 
conjunction with the faculty adviser in each field, in accordance with 
degree and major requirements. 

COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 

For the specialized curriculum required by the Pennsylvania 
State Department of Public Instruction for teachers of the Commer- 
cial subjects, see page 57. 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

For the specialized curriculum required by the Pennsylvania 
State Department of Public Instruction for teachers of Public 
School Music, see page 100. 



42 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

JOURNALISM 

The most adequate preparation for a career in journalism is a 
four-year liberal arts course with a major in English, and a broad 
cultural program in the social sciences, languages, and psychology. 
This should be followed by at least a year's study in a graduate school 
of journalism, although positions may be had on newspapers or 
magazines directly after leaving college. The outline for the first 
two years of the liberal arts course is found on page 55. Oppor- 
tunities are offered in college for students to obtain experience in this 
field by working on the college newspaper, the Susquehanna. 

LAW 

Entrance to an accredited law school is usually preceded by a 
four-year college course in which emphasis is placed on such funda- 
mental subjects as History, English, Foreign Languages, Psychology, 
Natural Science and Social Sciences. 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 3 

History of Western Culture 3 3 

Bible 2 2 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 1 3 3 

Evidences 2 

Ethics 2 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

Science or Mathematics 3 3 

General Psychology 3 

Educational or Applied Psychology 3 

American History 3 3 

The Junior and Senior years should be planned with the faculty 
adviser to pre-legal students in accordance with the requirements of 
the law school for which the student is preparing. 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 

A four-year course from an approved college is a prerequisite for 
entrance to schools of library science. Students should choose early 
the school at which they expect to do their graduate work in library 
science and plan their undergraduate work to moot its requirements. 
Such Btudents should also apply for employment in the College 
Library ns student assistants. 



PREPARATION FOR A CAREER 43 

First Second 
Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 3 

History of Western Culture 3 3 

Bible 2 2 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 3 

Evidences 2 

Ethics 2 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

Science or Mathematics 3 3 

General Psychology 3 

Educational or Applied Psychology 3 

American History 3 3 

The student preparing for library school should plan to major in 
English and minor in History and Political Science, with supple- 
mentary courses in Economics and Sociology. A year of typing is 
included in this course in the Junior year. 



MEDICAL SECRETAEIAL 

A heavily increasing demand for specially trained persons to act 
as secretaries for physicians, hospitals, and laboratories, has led 
Susquehanna to incorporate such training into its Business Depart- 
ment. 

Although such work is so highly specialized that a four-year 
college course is most desirable for those planning to enter this pro- 
fession, provision is made for those who feel they can give but two 
years to their training, to complete such work in that time as will 
enable them to obtain positions as medical secretaries. A suggested 
curriculum is as follows : 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Zoology 3 3 

Shorthand and Typing 5 5 

General Chemistry 3 3 

Bible 2 

Medical Terminology 1 

Home Nursing 1 

Personal Hygiene and First Aid 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

18 18 



44 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

F'irst Second 

Sophomore Yea?- Semester Semester 

General Psychology 3 

Abnormal Psychology 3 

Medical Shorthand 3 3 

Adv. Shorthand and Typing 5 5 

Medical Ethics 2 

Medical Office Practice and Procedure 2 

Principles of Sociology 3 

Business English 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

17 17 

Those who take the four-year course will follow a major in Biology 
and a minor in Chemistry, and other broad cultural courses, and will 
receive the degree of Bachelor of Science. 



MINISTRY 

Theological seminaries generally require a four-year college 
course for entrance. The American Association of Theological 
Schools has stated that the college work of pre-theological students 
should result in acquaintance with the world of today, in the ability 
to use certain tools of the educated man, and in a sense of achieve- 
ment. The ministry needs men of broad culture. To this end, the 
student preparing to enter the Seminary should lay emphasis on the 
liberal arts program of his college rather than the elements com- 
monly known as pre-professional. 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 3 

History of Western Culture 3 3 

Bible _■ 2 2 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 3 

American History 3 3 

General Psychology 3 

Applied Psychology 3 

Evidences 2 

Ethics 2 

Physical Education 1 1 

In the junior and senior years, pre-theological students ordinarily 
choose a major from the Classical Languages, English, History, 
Sociology, or Philosophy. 



PREPARATION FOR A CAREER 45 

The following are recommended as electives : 

Introduction to Philosophy 3 

History of Philosophy 3 

Modern Philosophers 3 

Principles of Sociology 6 

Principles of Economics 6 

Modern Social Problems 3 

The Family 3 

Abnormal Psychology 3 

Public Speaking 3 

Typing 4 

Techniques of Teaching 3 

American Literature 4 

Shakespeare 4 

American Government 3 



MUSIC 

Susquehanna has for many years emphasized the importance of 
music by maintaining a fully staffed Conservatory of Music. For 
full details of the specialized curriculum offered for the training of 
public school music teachers, see page 100. 



PHYSICAL THEEAPY TECHNICIAN 

According to the American Red Cross, there is an increasing 
demand for people trained as physio-therapists. They will be needed 
for work both during and immediately after the war. 

The physical therapy technician treats disorders, such as frac- 
tures, sprains, nervous diseases, and heart trouble according to a 
patient's needs or as prescribed by a physician, rendering treatments 
encompassing all of the physical therapeutic arts; gives exercises to 
patients designed to correct muscle ailments and deficiencies; admin- 
isters massages and performs other body manipulations; administers 
artificial sunray treatments, ultraviolet, or infrared ray treatments, 
therapeutic baths, and other water treatments. 

Red Cross requirements for registration as a physical therapy 
technician include 60 college semester hours, with courses in physics, 
chemistry, and biology, and a course of physical therapy of either 6 
months or 9 months from a school approved by the Council of Medi- 
cal Education and Hospitals of the American Medical Association. 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Zoology 3 3 

Principles of Sociology 3 3 

General Chemistry 3 3 



46 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

First Second 

Freshman Year (Continued) Semester Semester 

Bible 2 2 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 3 

Comparative Anatomy 3 3 

Introductory Physics 4 4 

General Psychology 3 

Abnormal or Applied Psychology 3 

American History 3 3 

Physical Education 1 1 



PRE-DENTISTRY 

The American Council on Dental Education has prescribed a 
minimum of two full years of college as a requirement for entrance 
to dental schools. The requirement is difficult to accomplish in two 
years and many students take more time. The trend in dentistry, 
as in the other professions, is toward a full four-year college course 
before entering dental school. 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Bible 2 2 

History of Western Culture 3 3 

General Chemistry 3 3 

Zoology 3 3 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 3 

Comparative Anatomy 3 3 

Organic Chemistry 4 4 

Introductory Physics 4 4 

General Psychology 3 

Applied Psychology 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

Students who continue on in the pre-dental course will arrange 

their schedules with their faculty adviser. 



PRE-MEDICINE 

Pre-medical students at Susquehanna are given close personal 
supervision by an adequate group of Bcience professors experienced 

in preparing students for the difficult study of medicine. The course 



PREPARATION FOR A CAREER 47 

listed below is merely suggestive since the requirements for admission 
to medical schools vary. 

First Second, 
Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

German or French 3 3 

History of Western Culture 3 3 

General Chemistry 3 3 

Introduction to College Mathematics 3 3 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 3 

German or French 3 3 

Bible 2 2 

General Psychology 3 

Qualitative Chemistry 3 3 

Zoology 3 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

Junior Year 

Evidences 2 

Ethics 2 

Organic Chemistry 4 4 

Physics 4 4 

Comparative Anatomy 3 3 

Histology or Embryology and Physiology 3 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

Senior Year 

Social Science 3 3 

Quantitative or Physical Chemistry 3 3 

Physics 3 3 

Histology or Embryology and Physiology 3 3 

Electives 3 3 



PEE-jS t URSING 

The ordinary hospital will accept high school graduates as candi- 
dates for nurses' training. Those who desire to enter the larger 
hospitals will do well to take at least one year of college work before 
beginning the strenuous life of nurses' training. 

Those who desire administrative and supervisory careers in 
nursing should plan for a combined five years' course (two years in 
college and three years in nurses' training). Some hospitals, such as 
the Medical Center of Columbia University in New York City, give 
the Bachelor of Science degree as well as the nurse's certification at 
the completion of such a five-year course. 



48 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 



A suggested two-year pre-nursing course is as follows : 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 



English Composition and Library Science 3 

Zoology 3 

Personal Hygiene 1 

Electives: Foreign Language 3 

: Principles of Sociology 3 

: General Chemistry 3 

: History of Western Culture 3 
Physical Education 



Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 

Comparative Anatomy 3 

Bible 2 

General Psychology 3 

Applied or Abnormal Psychology 



Electives: Foreign Language 3 

: Physics 4 

: American History 3 

: General Chemistry* 3 

: Principles of Sociology* 3 

Physical Education 



.6 or 7 



3 
3 

2 

3 
or 



PKE-VETERINAKY 

Susquehanna offers the two years of college work required for 
entrance into schools of veterinary medicine. The course is as 
follows : 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Bible 3 3 

History of Western Culture 3 3 

General Chemistry 3 3 

Zoology 3 3 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 3 

Organic Chemistry 4 4 

Comparative Anatomy 3 3 

General Psychology 3 

Botany 3 

Introductory Physics 4 4 

Physical Education 1 1 



PSYCHOLOGY 

Those who are interested in this field will find opportunities as 

clinical psychologists in child guidance clinics, school systems, hospi- 

•These courses should be elected if not taken in Freshman Year. 



PREPARATION FOR A CAREER 49 

tals, and law courts. Positions are also open as industrial psycholo- 
gists with employment offices, in government, industry, or in research. 
Graduate study is necessary for these positions after completing the 
requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in 
Psychology. Those interested in clinical psychology should take 
additional work in chemistry and biology, and those interested in 
industrial psychology should take supplementary work in sociology 
and economics. 

SECRETARIAL 

Two, three, and four-year courses for secretaries are available. 
The first two years are outlined below. Those who wish to take a 
four-year course, and prepare for executive and other secretarial 
positions open in the business world to college graduates, may do so, 
and will receive the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Commercial and Economic Geography 3 3 

Commercial Mathematics 3 

Elementary Accounting 3 

Shorthand and Typing 5 5 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Bible 2 

Physical Education 1 1 

16 18 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 

Business English 3 

General Psychology 3 

Machine Accounting 3 

Office Practice 3 

Salesmanship 3 

Intermediate Accounting 3 3 

Typing and Shorthand 5 5 

Physical Education 1 1 

18 18 

SOCIAL WORK 

Those who are planning to be social workers should take a four 
year liberal arts course with a major in sociology, and additional 
courses in psychology, economics, and similar subjects to provide a 
broad cultural background. Upon graduation from college the 
student who wishes to be a professional social worker should go to a 
specialized graduate school of social work for one or two years. Po- 
sitions as Visitors in the Pennsylvania Department of "Welfare and 
Public Assistance require graduation from college. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 



ADMISSION 

Susquehanna's policy is one of individualized attention for all stu- 
dents. In line with this policy, provision is made to accept for 
entrance any student with fifteen units from an accredited secondary 
school who shows promise of succeeding in college, regardless of the 
distribution of the high school units. In determining an applicant's 
eligibility for admission, the Committee on Admissions examines evi- 
dence relating to the whole personality of the applicant. This evi- 
dence relates to his scholarship, to his character and ideals, to the 
general character or pattern of his study in high school, to his pur- 
pose in attending college, to his health, and to other points of strength 
or weakness in his school preparation, personality, and general cul- 
tural background. 

A candidate must present evidence of good moral character as 
well as of proficiency in those studies which are prerequisites for 
the curriculum desired. A certificate from the principal or head- 
master of the high school or preparatory school will be accepted as 
evidence that the scholastic requirements for entrance have been met. 

In applying for admission, the student should signify the cur- 
riculum for which he wishes to enroll. A student coming to Susque- 
hanna University from another college is required to submit a tran- 
script of work already completed and a statement of honorable dis- 
missal from each institution previously attended. Special blanks 
will be furnished upon request. 

A student entering Susquehanna University is required to have a 
medical examination before his registration is completed. Blanks 
for this purpose can be secured by applying to the Secretary of 
Admissions. 

All new students are required to take scholastic aptitude tests. 

ADMISSION UNDER THE WAR EMERGENCY 

Freshmen will be admitted in June, July, September, and January 
for the duration of the war emergency. In accordance with the action 
of the Department of Public Instruction of Pennsylvania, qualified 
students from the upper levels of their high school classes may be 
admitted to Susquehanna on the completion of ;>'- years of a stan- 
dard secondary school course, provided they are specially recom- 
mended for this exceptional privilege by their responsible high school 
officials. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 51 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

A minimum of fifteen units is required if the student enters from 
a four-year, fully accredited high school or secondary school, or 
thirteen units if he enters on the completion of 3% years of a stan- 
dard secondary school course, or twelve units if he enters from a 
three-year fully accredited senior high school or secondary school. 
The units must be distributed as follows : 

For the Bachelor of Arts Degree 
The following pattern of subjects is recommended for entrance, 
but those students who desire to pursue this course, and lack one or 
more of these requirements, will be given a chance to correct the 
deficiency during the freshman year.* 

English, 3 units; Foreign Language, 2 units of one language; 
Mathematics (including Algebra and Plane Geometry), 2 units; His- 
tory, 1 unit ; Science, 1 unit ; and electives to make fifteen units. 

For the Bachelor of Science Degree 

English, 3 units; History, 1 unit; Science, 1 unit, and electives to 
make fifteen units. 

For the Bachelor of Science in Music Education Degree 
Candidates for this degree must present fifteen units of secondary 
school work, and show evidence of aptitude in music. 

REGISTRATION 

At the beginning of the college year each student will be given 
instructions about enrollment in classes and the payment of bills. 
Details regarding registration will be posted on the official bulletin 
boards on registration days. 

For registration after the day announced, a charge of five dollars 
will he made. No student will be permitted to register later than 
two weeks after registration day. No course may be changed one 
week after registration day. If a change of registration is made 
after the one week period, a charge of one dollar will be made. A 
course dropped without the permission of the dean and the instructor 
will be recorded as a failure. 

MARKING SYSTEM AND QUALITY POINTS 

A (90-100) Excellent 3 quality points for each credit hour 

B (80-89) Good 2 quality points for each credit hour 

C (70-79) Average 1 quality point for each credit hour 

D (60-69) Passing quality point for each credit hour 

F (Below 60) Failure No credit unless repeated 

♦Students planning to take Pre-Medical, Pre-Dental, Pre- Veterinary or other pre- 
professional courses must satisfy the state requirements for secondary work in these 
professions. In general, these requirements follow the pattern recommended for 
entrance to course leading to A.B. degree. 



52 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

No D grade will be counted towards a major. If a student fails 
to earn a satisfactory grade in a course in his major, the course must 
be repeated at Susquehanna if credit toward his major is desired. 
Summer school work elsewhere will not meet requirements for the 
major. 

SCHOLASTIC REGULATIONS 

A student who fails to earn at least fourteen semester hours credit 
with an equal number of quality points per semester shall be on 
scholastic probation. Two successive semesters on scholastic proba- 
tion will automatically cause a student to be dropped from the col- 
lege. "Work left incomplete because of illness or other unavoidable 
circumstances must be completed within the next semester in attend- 
ance. 

The normal schedule of a student is sixteen or seventeen credits a 
semester, depending on his total course requirements. To carry 
more than this number, a student must have an average mark of B 
during the preceding semester, and must secure permission from the 
dean. The minimum load of a regular student is fourteen credits 
and the maximum is twenty credits. A special student carrying fewer 
than fourteen hours a week will pay ten dollars per semester hour 
and special fees. There will be no refund for courses dropped two 
weeks after registration day. A transcript and a certificate of 
honorable dismissal will be issued only after full payment of all fees. 

MAJORS AND MINORS 

The courses of study are known as general required courses, 
major courses, minor courses, and elective courses. 

As early as possible, and not later than the end of the sophomore 
year, each candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Arts should 
choose one major field in which he intends to concentrate, and 
one minor field. A major field is one pursued for at least twenty- 
four semester hours, and a minor is one pursued for at least eighteen 
semester hours. The program of major and minor fields shall be 
arranged by the student in consultation with the dean of the college 
and the professor in the field chosen as a major. A major may be 
chosen from the following: 

Biological Sciences Mathematics 

Classical Languages Modern Langi 

Economics Philosophy 

English Physical Sciences 

History and Political Psychology 

Scien c k Sociology 

No major may be changed except by the consent of tli*' dean and 
the department concerned. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 53 

GRADUATION" REQUIREMENTS 

Susquehanna University offers one curriculum consisting of four 
years of college work leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree. This 
curriculum provides a broad, liberal culture which serves as the 
proper foundation for any of the learned professions or for speciali- 
zation in graduate study, and provides a broad basis of general 
knowledge. The Bachelor of Arts degree is conferred only after a 
student has satisfactorily completed 132 semester hours with at least 
132 quality points. 

The Bachelor of Science degree is given in Business Administra- 
tion and in Commercial Education upon the completion of 136 semes- 
ter hours with at least 136 quality points. It is also given to those 
students who complete the Soloist Course in the Conservatory of 
Music. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Music Education is awarded 
to those students who complete the public school music courses pre- 
scribed for this degree in the Conservatory of Music. 

Each student will be responsible for keeping his own yearly record 
of the fulfillment of his graduation requirements, so that he may 
know at all times where he stands. Although the office will keep the 
record also and advise the student concerning it, ultimate failure to 
meet any graduation requirement will be the student's responsibility. 

HONORS AT GRADUATION" 

Seniors having an average of 2.75 to 3.00 quality points per 
semester hour during their college careers are graduated summa cum 
laude. Those with an average of 2.50 to 2.74 quality points per 
semester hour are graduated magna cum laude. Those with an aver- 
age of 2.25 to 2.49 quality points per semester hour are graduated 
cum laude. Honors are announced at the commencement exercises. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

Freshmen will be given sophomore ranking upon the completion 
of thirty semester hours with as many quality points. Sophomores 
will become juniors upon the completion of sixty-four semester hours, 
with sixty-four quality points. Juniors will become seniors upon 
the completion of ninety-eight semester hours with ninety-eight 
quality points. 

STATEMENT OF CREDITS 

Upon graduation or upon withdrawal before graduation, a stu- 
dent is entitled to one certified statement of his college credits. A 
fee of one dollar is charged for each additional certificate. 



54 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

MINIMUM RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS 

To be eligible for graduation, a student must complete the min- 
imum residence requirement of thirty semester hours. Only work 
taken in the regular college classes during the college year will count 
toward this requirement. 

REPORTS 

Reports of students doing unsatisfactory or failing work are made 
to the office at intervals during the semester. Whenever a student 
does unsatisfactory or failing work in two or more subjects, he will 
be asked to confer with the dean and a notice will be sent to the 
parent or guardian. Final reports of the work of each student are 
sent to the parent or guardian at the end of each semester. 

ATTENDANCE REGULATIONS 

Students are expected to attend all classes for which they have 
registered and all chapel services. Absences are counted from the 
first recitation in each course. Ten absences from classes during a 
semester are allowed a student. Absence from a class period twenty- 
four hours before or after a vacation or a holiday will count double. 
An unavoidable absence should be covered by an acceptable excuse 
which must be filed in the office not later than one week after the end 
of the period of absence. For each unexcused absence in excess of 
ten, one-fifth of a semester hour of credit shall be deducted from the 
student's total number of semester hours of credit for that semester. 
A student who has incurred three times as many absences in a course 
as there are semester hours of credit for that course may, at the option 
of the instructor in consultation with the dean of the college, be drop- 
ped from that course. For every three unexcused chapel absences, 
one-fifth of a semester hour shall be deducted from the student's total 
number of semester hours for that semester. 

DEAN'S HONOR LIST 

Following each semester examination period, the names of stu- 
dents who have made very high averages for that period will be 
announced by the Dean of the College. Students on the Dean's 
Honor List will be excused from the ordinary attendance regulations 
governing class recitations. They will not be excused from chapel, 
private lesson appointments, and announced recitations or tests. 

THE ACCELERATED ACADEMIC YEAR 

During the war emergency the college year will be divided into 
two Long terms of sixteen weeks each and two summer terms of six 
weeks each. For the opening and closing dates of the-, terms see 
the college calendar on pages 7 and 8. 



COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR 
DEGREES 

BACHELOK OF ARTS 

Susquehanna is primarily a liberal arts college. As such, it seeks 
to give a rich cultural training to its liberal arts students. During 
the first two years of college the student should lay broad foundations 
in the general cultural courses so that in his junior and senior years 
he may work on the more specialized programs required for the 
various professions. 

The course requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree in semes- 
ter hours are as follows : English, 12 hrs. ; Foreign Language, 12 
hrs. ; Science (Science Survey, Chemistry, Physics, Biology) or 
Mathematics, 12 hrs. ; History of Western Europe, 6 hrs. ; American 
History, 6 hrs.; Bible and Religion, 8 hrs.; Psychology, 6 hrs.; 
Personal Hygiene and Physical Education, 8 hrs. These required 
courses total 70 semester hours. In addition, the student will choose 
elective courses in his major and minor fields to bring the grand 
total required for graduation up to 132 semester hours. 

A suggested program of work for the first two years of the liberal 
arts course is as follows : 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First Semester Second Semester 

English Comp. & Library Sc. _ 3 English Composition 3 

Foreign Language 3 Foreign Language 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 Science or Mathematics 3 

History of Western Europe 3 History of Western Europe 3 

Bible 2 Bible 2 

Personal Hygiene 1 Personal Hygiene 1 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

16 16 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

English Literature 3 English Literature 3 

Evidences 2 Ethics 2 

Foreign Language 3 Foreign Language 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 Science or Mathematics 3 

General Psychology 3 Educational or Applied 

American History 3 Psychology 3 

Physical Education 1 American History 3 

Physical Education 1 



18 



18 



56 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

In the junior and senior years the student will complete any gen- 
eral course requirements still outstanding and specialize in the major 
and minor fields of his own choosing. 



BACHELOK OF SCIENCE 
(Business Administration) 

The Bachelor of Science degree is awarded to those who finish the 
four-year course in Business Administration. 

The general course requirements in Business Administration in 
terms of semester hours are English, 9 hrs. ; American Government, 
6 hrs.; American History or Sociology, 6 hrs.; Bible and Keligion, 
8 hrs.; General Psychology, 3 hrs.; Science or Mathematics, 6 hrs.; 
Principles of Economics, 6 hrs.; Personal Hygiene and Physical 
Education, 8 hrs. 

The required general courses total 52 semester hours. In addi- 
tion the student will follow courses in the field of Business Adminis- 
tration to bring the grand total to 136 semester hours, required for 
graduation. 

A suggested program for the first two years of the Business 
Administration Course is as follows : 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First Semester Second Semester 

English Comp. & Library Sc. __ 3 English Composition 3 

Economic Geography 3 Economic Geography 3 

Commercial Mathematics 3 Elementary Accounting 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 Science or Mathematics 3 

Industrial Development 3 Business Principles 3 

Personal Hygiene 1 Personal Hygiene 1 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

17 17 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

English Literature 3 Business English 3 

Bible 2 Bible 2 

Intermediate Accounting 3 Intermediate Accounting 3 

Economics 21 3 Economics 22 3 

American History or Sociology 3 American History or Sociology 3 

Business Law 29 3 Business Law 30 3 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

18 18 

In the junior ;md senior years, the student will complete any 
general course requirements still outstanding and will specialize in 
Business Administration courses and allied fields. 




STEELE SCIENCE HALL 



COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 57 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

(Commercial Education) 

The Bachelor of Science degree is awarded to those who finish 
the four-year course in Commercial Education. This curriculum 
permits its graduates to secure a College Provisional Certificate 
licensing them to teach the commercial subjects in Pennsylvania 
high schools. With minor changes, it also qualifies them to teach 
these subjects in New Jersey and New York. 

The general course requirements for this degree in terms of 
semester hours are English, 12 hrs. ; Bible and Religion, 8 hrs. ; 
Science or Mathematics, 6 hrs. ; General Psychology, 3 hrs. ; Ameri- 
can History, 6 hrs. ; Principles of Economics, 6 hrs. ; American Gov- 
ernment, 6 hrs. ; Personal Hygiene and Physical Education, 8 hrs. 

These required courses total 55 semester hours. In addition the 
student will follow courses in Commercial Education to bring the 
grand total to 136 semester hours, required for graduation. 

A suggested program of work for the first two years of the Com- 
mercial Education course is as follows:** 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First Semester Second Semester 

English Comp. & Library Sc. _ 3 English Composition 3 

Economic Geography 3 Economic Geography 3 

Commercial Mathematics 3 Elementary Accounting 3 

Elementary Shorthand* 3 Intermediate Shorthand 3 

Elementary Typing* 2 Intermediate Typing 2 

Personal Hygiene 1 Personal Hygiene 1 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

16 16 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

English Literature 3 English Literature 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 Science or Mathematics 3 

Bible 2 Bible 2 

Intermediate Accounting 3 Advanced Typing 2 

Intermediate Shorthand 3 Advanced Shorthand 3 

Intermediate Typing 2 Intermediate Accounting 3 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

17 17 

In the junior and senior years, the student will complete any 
general course requirement still outstanding and will specialize in 

♦Students who have completed the equivalent of these elementary courses in the 
high school will not register for typing and shorthand until the second semester, and 
will then be privileged to graduate with a minimum of 6 hrs. of typing, and 9 hrs. 
of shorthand. 

**Students successfully completing the first two years of any of the secretarial cur- 
ricula, (70 semester hours with an equal number of quality points), will be given a 
certificate in Secretarial Studies which will qualify them for employment. 



58 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Commercial Education courses as recommended by the Pennsylvania 
State Department of Public Instruction, as follows: 

Junior Year: General Psychology, 3 hrs. Principles of Economics, 
6 hrs. American History, 6 hrs. Advanced Accounting, 3 hrs. 
(elective). Introduction to Teaching, 3 hrs. Shorthand and Typing 
Methods, 2 hrs. Bookkeeping Methods, 2 hrs. Educational Psy- 
chology, 3 hrs. Salesmanship, 3 hrs. Physical Education, 2 hrs. 
Evidences, 2 hrs. Business Law, 6 hrs. 

Senior Year: American Government, 6 hrs. Consumer Eco- 
nomics, 3 hrs. Office Practice, 3 hrs. Business Law, 6 hrs. Com- 
mercial Curriculum, 3 hrs. Ethics, 2 hrs. Practice Teaching, 6 hrs. 
Machine Accounting, 3 hrs. Salesmanship, 3 hrs. Business English, 
3 hrs. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MUSIC EDUCATION 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Music Education is awarded 
to those students who complete 133 semester hours in the Conservatory 
of Music in the curriculum which has been approved by' the State 
Council on Education for the preparation of supervisors and teachers 
of public school music in Pennsylvania.* 

*The detailed courses will be found on pages 102-110. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



The courses with odd numbers are given during the first semester, 
and those with even numbers are given during the second semester. 
Courses open primarily to freshmen are numbered eleven to twenty 
inclusive; to sophomores, twenty-one to thirty inclusive; to juniors, 
thirty-one to forty inclusive; and to seniors upward from forty-one. 



AKT 

Mr. Ahl 

22 Art Appreciation — Ancient 

A general survey of sculpture and painting in Ancient Egypt, 
Mesopotamia, Asia Minor, Greece, and Italy. The most important 
factors that have influenced the arts (religious beliefs; social, eco- 
nomic, and political factors; geography and climate) will be studied. 
The purpose of this course is to supply an elementary equipment for 
critical appreciation and the development of taste. 

Three hours. Three credits. 



BIBLE AJSTD KELIGION 

Mr. Kretschmann 

21 Old Testament 

The Bible is studied as a book of divine revelation which is pre- 
sented in the various literary forms of story, oratory, wisdom, lyric 
and drama. The method followed in this cultural study is to have 
the student read selected portions of the Scriptures, and familiarize 
himself with the contents of the same and understand the relation of 
each part to the whole. The purpose is not only to acquaint the 
student with the rich treasures of thought in the divine Word but 
also to develop his spiritual sense of appreciation of the truth and to 
cultivate a love for the Book so that he will desire to read and study 
it throughout life. 
Two hours. Two credits 



60 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

22 New Testament 

The course of study follows the plan of the Old Testament, with 
the necessary emphasis upon the life of Christ as presented in the 
Gospels, and the building up of His Church as it is related in history, 
letter, and prophecy. An effort is made to show the relation between 
the Old and New Testaments, in prophecy and fulfillment, and to 
convince the student that Jesus was not a mere man but the very Son 
of God. 

Two hours. Tivo credits 



31 Evidences of Christianity 

A complete system of Christian Evidence. The course is intended 
to present to the student the salient facts of Christian truth not only 
by direct positive instruction with a defence of Christianity, but also 
by the consideration of the various philosophies and religions of men 
in order to show that the Christian religion is the best that is known 
to man and most adequate to meet the requirements of the highest 
development of manhood and womanhood. 

Two hours. Two credits 

32 Christian Ethics 

The purpose is to set forth the principles of right conduct as 
exemplified in the life of Christ and in the teaching of the New 
Testament so as to grip the mind and heart and to prepare the indi- 
vidual to meet the temptations of life with a positive faith and with 
principles of character and conduct that will develop the highest 
type of manhood and the noblest citizenship. 

Two hours. Two credits 

33 Apostolic Period 

In this study, Apostolic Christianity is presented as it is set forth 
in the Acts of the Apostles and in the Epistles of the New Testament, 
in such a manner as to give a clear view of the historic situation in 
the Roman and Jewish world of the first century in which Christi- 
anity had to gain a foothold. Alternates with 35. 

Two hours. Two credits 

34 The Psychology of Religion 

Religion is considered as flip deepest experience of the human soul 
in which all man's God-given faculties find their fullest expression. 

Alternates witli 36. 

Two hours. Two credits: 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 61 

35 Social Teachings of Jesus 

In search for a solution of the modern problems of society in 
political, institutional, civic and domestic spheres, the attention of 
the student is directed to the Master-Teacher, and to His chosen 
disciples who gave expression in their writings to His principles of 
social behaviour. Alternates with 33. 
Two hours. Two credits 

36 Comparative Religion 

The various religions are studied to discover the elements that are 
fundamental in all religious thinking and which point to a divine 
origin of religion itself. The Christian religion is presented as the 
absolute religion which satisfies the whole man in all his needs and 
which reveals these fundamentals in such a way as to be adapted to 
all races of mankind. Alternates with 34. 

Two hours. Two credits. 



BIOLOGY 

Mr. Sc udder 

P re-medical students must take 24 semester hours of biology, in- 
cluding Courses 21-22, 31-32, 41-42, 43 and 46; 26 semester hours in 
chemistry, including Courses 11, 12, 21, 22, 31, 32; 11 semester hours 
in physics; and at least six semester hours in mathematics. The 
language requirement must be satisfied in either German or French. 
Latin is also recommended. 

Courses 11-12, 21-22, 31-32 and electives to make 24 semester 
hours are required for a major. The minor should be chosen from 
another science or from mathematics. At last six semester hours 
must be taken in each of the following: chemistry, physics, mathe- 
matics. 

Courses 11-12, 21-22 and electives to make 18 semester hours are 
required for a minor. At least six semester hours must be taken in 
one of the following: chemistry, physics, mathematics. 

11-12 Botany 

A study of structure and physiology in higher plants with a con- 
sideration of typical life histories of flowering plants, conifers, ferns, 
mosses, fungi and algae. 

Two recitations and one three-hour laboratory period throughout the 
year. Six credits. 



62 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

21-22 Zoology 

A survey of the principal groups of animals from the standpoint 
of structure, physiology, the life cycle and biological theory. 
Two recitations and one three-hour laboratory period throughout the 
year. Six credits. 

31-32 Comparative Anatomy 

Both phylogeny and ontogeny are considered in interpreting the 
adult structure of vertebrates. The dogfish, Necturus, and the cat 
are dissected in the laboratory. Prerequisite, Course 21-22. 
Tivo recitations and one three-hour laboratory period throughout the 
year. Six credits. 

33 Bacteriology 

The classification, structure and physiology of microorganisms 
and their importance in nature and in disease are discussed. Bacteri- 
ological methods are emphasized in the laboratory. Prerequisite, 
Course 11-12 or 21-22. 
Two recitations and one three-hour laboratory period. Three credits. 

35 Heredity 

A study of the manner in which characteristics are transmitted 
from one generation to the next, with a discussion of the application 
of hereditary principles to the improvement of the human race. 
Prerequisite, Course 11-12 or 21-22. 
Three recitations. Three credits. 

39-40 Laboratory Histology, to replace or supplement 41-42 
One recitation or 3 hours of laboratory per credit. 

41-42 Histology 

A study of the microscopic anatomy of the tissues and organs of 
mammals with a consideration of methods of preparing animal tis- 
sues of microscopic study. Prerequisites, Courses 21-22 and 31-32, 
but may accompany 31-32. Alternates with 43 and 46. 
Tivo recitations and one three-hour laboratory period throughout the 
year. Six credits. 

43 Embryology 

The development of chordates is studied by a brief review of con- 
ditions in Amphioxus and the frog, followed by a fuller consideration 
of young chick embryos. A textbook, whole mounts and serial sec- 
tions are used. Prerequisites, Courses 21-22 and 31-32, but may 
accompany 31-32. Alternates with 41-42. Not given 1945-46. 
One recitation and six hours laboratory. Three credits. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 63 

44 Laboratory Embryology 

This course is designed for those who do not plan to pursue course 
43. The amount and character of the work will be arranged in 
accordance with the needs and the qualifications of individual stu- 
dents. Prerequisite, at least course 21-22. Given as required. 
Three hours of laboratory work per credit. 1-3 credits. 

46 Physiology 

A study of the manner in Avhich the tissues and organs of the body 
perform their functions. Prerequisites, Courses 21-22 and 31-32, 
but may accompany 31-32. Alternates with 41-42. USTot given 1945- 
46. 
Three recitations. Three credits. 

48 Seminar 

An informal course primarily for majors. A variety of biological 
topics will be discussed or assigned for special reports. Special in- 
terests of individual students will be considered. Given as required. 
One or two recitations. One credit. 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION" 

13 Commercial Mathematics 

A thorough study of the mathematics of business with special 
attention to short methods of computation. The course includes a 
review of fractions, decimals, percentage, profit and loss problems, 
aliquot parts, and bills. A complete mastery of interest, bank dis- 
count, insurance, taxes and other allied problems is required of the 
students. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Reitz 

14 Elementary Principles of Accounting 

A study of the technique of bookkeeping in the ordinary business 
enterprise covering the principles of debiting, crediting, posting, and 
constructing of simplified financial statements. Lectures, problems, 
and laboratory. 

Three hours recitation and two hours laboratory. Three credits. 

Mr. Reitz 

16 Business Principles 

A survey course giving a comprehensive picture of modern busi- 
ness and providing a foundation for later specialized courses. It 
includes a study of the relations between business and other sciences 
with special attention to the application of scientific methods to 
business problems. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Graham 



64 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

21-22 Intermediate Accounting Theory and Practice 

An intensive as well as extensive study of accounting as applied 
by modern business organizations. Journal columnization, special 
journals, ledgers, controlling accounts, accruals, deferred items, finan- 
cial papers, and work sheets receive special attention. Lectures, 
problems, and practice sets. 

Three recitation hours, two laboratory hours throughout the year. Six 
credits. Mr. Graham 

25 Mathematics of Finance 

The mathematical theory underlying interest, annuities, deprecia- 
tion, mortality, insurance, and investments. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Robison 

29-30 Business Law 

This course gives a survey of law as needed by the layman. It 
deals with the buying and selling of real estate, negotiable instru- 
ments, uniform conditional sales act, and other business laws. A 
study is also made of court procedure. 
Three hours. Six credits. Mr. Reitz 

31 Business Law 

This course is a continuation of Business Law 29 and 30 and is 
intended for students who plan to enter the field of accounting or 
financial management. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Reitz 

32 Machine Accounting 

The aim of this course is to teach the fundamental principles 
underlying the installation and operation of the recording mechanical 
devices in the modern business office. The place of bookkeeping 
machines in any well proportioned system of record keeping is par- 
ticularly considered. Students are required to complete practice sets 
on the Burroughs, Underwood, and Dalton bookkeeping machines. 
They are also given instruction and work on the various adding and 
calculating machines. Demonstrations and lectures. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Reitz 

34 Industrial Management 

This course deals with the principles and policies of scientific 
management and their application to modern industry. It includes 
problems of organization, scientific methods, plant location, depart- 
mental layout, methods of control, and production and wage incen- 
tives, with special attention to the procedures and techniques used by 
management in coordinating industrial activities. 
Three hotirs. Three credits. Mr. Reitz 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 65 

35-36 Advanced Accounting 

This course provides theory and problem work in valuation of 
assets and capital stock, investments, funds and reserves, comparative 
statements, analysis of working capital, profit and loss analysis, mis- 
cellaneous ratios, and estate and trust accounting. 

Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. Mr. Reitz 

37' Cost Accounting 

Methods are used to illustrate the finding of the cost of production. 
Problems dealing with determining value of goods in process, budget- 
ary control, and operating expenses are considered. 

Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Reitz 



39-40 Statistical Methods (See Mathematics for the description 
of this course.) 

Mr. Reitz 



41 Auditing 

The complete program and procedure of the auditor is studied. 
Current methods used in detecting fraudulent manipulations form a 
most interesting feature of the course. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Reitz 



42 Federal Tax Accounting 

A study of the Federal Revenue Act. Special attention is given 
to the problems and difficulties arising in the filing of income tax 
returns for the different classes of tax payers. Practical problems 
and questions, including the preparation of actual income tax returns 
on facsimiles of government forms constitute an important part of 
the training. 

Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Reitz 



46 Salesmanship 

Salesmanship has for its basis the influencing of others by adver- 
tising or personal effort. In this course the psychological fundamen- 
tals of argument or reasoning, and suggestion or emotion will be 
stressed. A consideration will be given to a study of the characters 
of others and the qualifications needed by the salesman. 

Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Reitz 



66 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

CHEMISTRY 

Courses 11, 12, 21, 22, 31, 32 and either 41-42, or 43-44 are re- 
quired for a major. Those planning to go into Industrial Chemistry 
or Government work in this field should take at least thirty-six hours. 
Supporting courses for major are : Two years of mathematics, 2 
years of physics, 6 hours of biology. Courses 11, 12 and other 
courses to make 18 semester hours are required for a minor. Sup- 
porting course : one year of mathematics. 

11 General Chemistry 

A study of the occurrence, preparation, properties and uses of 
nonmetallic elements and their chief compounds. The fundamentals 
of chemistry are stressed. Students who have not submitted entrance 
credits in chemistry will comprise the first section. Section two is 
designed for those who have submitted satisfactory entrance credits 
in this subject. 

Two recitation hours, two to three laboratory hours. Three credits. 

Mr. Houtz 

12 General Chemistry 

The chemistry of the atmosphere and nitrogen and some of their 
most important relations are considered. The occurrence, metallurgy, 
properties and uses of the metallic elements are studied ; a brief 
introduction to the chemistry of the carbon compounds is included. 

Two recitation hours, two to three laboratory hours. Three credits. 

Mr. Houtz 

21 Qialitative Analysis 

The principles of analysis are studied by considering the reactions 
of known metals. The writing of chemical equations, using ionic 
equations is emphasized. The determination of metals in alloys and 
compounds is required. 

Two recitation hours, two to six laboratory hours. Three or four credits. 

Mr. Fisher 

22 Qualitative Analysis 

After a knowledge of the principles and methods of analysis of 
compound substances and mixtures lias been obtained, students are 
required to determine at leasl twenty-five unknown mixtures of 
natural and manufactured products. 

Two recitation hours, three to six laboratory hours. Three or four 
credit*. Mr. Fisher 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 67 

31 Organic Chemistry 

The alipathic compounds, comprising the saturated and the un- 
saturated carbon compounds, are considered. The reactions involved 
in their preparation, including the writing of chemical equations, are 
stressed. Detailed methods are used, and reactions involved in all 
laboratory work are required. Prerequisits : 11 and 12. 

Two recitation hours, four to six laboratory hours. Four credits. 

Mr. Houtz 

32 Organic Chemistry 

The cyclic compounds, comprising the alicyclic and aromatic com- 
pounds, are considered. Special attention is given to their prepara- 
tion, characteristics and uses. Critical reports of all laboratory work 
are required. Prerequisites, 11, 12 and 31. 

Two recitation hours, four to six laboratory hours. Four credits. 

Mr. Houtz 

41 Quantitative Analysis 

Standard solutions are prepared. Determinations by neutrali- 
zations in alkalimetry and acidimetry, oxidation and reduction are 
made. Typical known substances are used to acquire knowledge of 
principles of analysis. This is followed by the analysis of compounds 
including iron ores, water, limestones, and alloys. 

Two recitation hours, three to six laboratory hours. Three or four 
credits. Mr. Fisher 

42 Quantitative Analysis 

Principles and methods of gravimetric analysis are studied. 
Determinations of copper, barium, sulphate, calcium, silver, chlorine, 
aluminum, potassium, magnesium, phosphates, carbonates, and car- 
bon dioxide are made. Copper, silver, and alloys are determined by 
electroanalysis. 

Two recitation hours, three to six laboratory hours. Three or four 
credits. Mr. Fisher 

43-44 Physical Chemistry 

The object of the course is to give a theoretical reason for the 
statements underlying previous studies in chemistry. With this as a 
background, there are then given the gas laws, elementary thermo- 
dynamics, radio-activity, atomic structure, X-rays, solutions, colloids, 
heterogeneous and homogeneous reactions. A laboratory course par- 
allels the lectures and recitations. Prerequisites, 11, 12, 21, 22. 

Two recitation hours, and two to four laboratory hours throughout the' 
year. Six to eight credits. Mr. Fisher 



68 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 

13 Commercial Mathematics (See Business Administration) 

14 Elementary Principles of Accounting (See Business Admin- 

istration) 

15-16 Typewriting 

Instruction and mastery of the keyboard. The mechanical fea- 
tures of the typewriter. Letter writing, tabulation, and the prepara- 
tion of business papers. 

Five hours first semester, four hours second semester. Four credits. 

Miss Allison 

17-18 Gregg Shorthand 

Instruction in the principles of shorthand. Emphasis on both 
reading and writing. Dictation and transcription of practiced 
letters. 

Five hours first semester, three hours second semester. Six credits. 

Miss Allison 

19 Medical Aid and Simple Nursing Techniques 

This course includes the Standard Red Cross First Aid and Home 
Nursing techniques. It is designed to aid the medical secretary in 
dealing with emergencies, and to provide a background of knowledge 
in sickroom procedure, mental and physical hygiene, and sanitation. 

Two hours. One credit. Miss Hein 

20 Medical Terminology 

A study of the prefixes, suffixes, abbreviations, and definitions of 
medical terms, is the basis of this course. The student learns the 
vocabulary of medical, anatomical, pathological and scientific terms, 
and studies the derivation and correct spelling and pronunciation of 
these terms. 

Two hours. One credit. Miss Hein 

21-22 Intermediate Accounting Theory and Practice (See Busi- 
ness Administration) 

25-26 Typewriting 

Prerequisite: Commercial Education 16. Perfecting and making 
permanenl the skill established in the first year. Speed and ac- 
curacy emphasized. Practice in the writing of manuscripts, legal 
papers, stenciling, business letters and papers. 

Four hours throughout the year. Four credits. MISS ALLISON 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 69 

27-28 Gregg Shorthand 

Prerequisite: Commercial Education 16 and 18. Advanced 
work in shorthand. Dictation and transcription of business letters, 
technical matter, and radio addresses. 

Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. Miss Allison 

30 Medical Shorthand 

Prerequisite : Commercial Education 26 and 28. A study of 
technical medical terminology; prefixes and suffixes, phrases, and 
special outlines. Dictation and transcription of technical material. 

Three hours. Three credits. Miss Allison 

32 Machine Accounting (See Business Administration) 

33-34 Medical Ethics and Office Procedure 

This course is given for medical secretarial students. The aim is 
to provide an understanding of office and hospital ethics, the relation 
of the doctor and the patient, the various specialties in the field of 
medicine, and the business side of a doctor's office dealing with such 
aspects as records, fees, accounts, the doctor and the law, and liability 
and insurance. 

Two hours throughout the year. Miss Hein 

35 Bookkeeping Teaching Methods 

A comparative study of bookkeeping methods as presented by the 
authors of the leading high school texts together with the modern 
methods of teaching every phase of the subject in secondary schools. 
Lectures, problems, and reference assignments. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Reitz 

37 Shorthand and Typewriting Methods 

Prerequisite : Commercial Education 26 and 28. A critical 
study of objectives, psychological laws underlying skills, organiza- 
tion of materials, tests, and standards of achievement. Special 
attention is given to the different methods of teaching shorthand and 
typewriting. The student is given practice in drawing up lesson 
plans and teaching. 
Two hours. Two credits. Miss Allison 



70 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

38 Business English 

A course designed to give students an understanding of the service 
of communication to business, and training in the writing of com- 
munication forms in typical business situations. Special attention is 
given to the letter of application and reports. 
Three hours. Three credits. Miss Allison 

39 Office Practice 

Prerequisite : Commercial Education 26 and 28. A general over- 
view of the function of the office in modern business. A systematic 
coverage of office routines. The uses and operating principles of 
various office machines. 
Three hours. Three credits. Miss Allison 

41-42 Medical Office Practice 

The practical aspect of the demands on a medical secretary, the 
use of office equipment, sterilization, care and preparation of instru- 
ments. The student learns the use of the clinical thermometer, 
sphygmomanometer; and other simple techniques, such as chemical 
urine analysis, and preparation for examination and minor opera- 
tions. This course includes some practical experience in this work. 
Two hours throughout the year. Two credits. Miss Hein 

43 The Commercial Curriculum 

A comprehensive treatment of the commercial curriculum of the 
secondary school. Such topics as the origin and development of the 
commercial curriculum, constructive criticisms of existing curricula, 
cardinal principles of commercial education, the curriculum and 
local conditions, construction of curricula, and the curricula of today 
will be studied. Lectures, reference assignments, and report-. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Reitz 

44 Consumer Economics 

The distinctive feature of this course is that it works through 
established economic principles from the consumer point of view. 
The main objective is to discover and point the w&y toward wiser 
consuming practices calculated to promote human welfare. Such 
topics as intelligent buying of the necessities of lite, investments, 
standards for consumers, and government aids to consumers are in- 
cluded in this course. Lectures, reference assignim nts, and high 
school teaching techniques. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Reitz 

45-46 Practice Teaching (See Education) 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 71 

ECONOMICS 

Courses 15, 21, 22, 35, 36, 45 and six hours selected from other 
approved Economics courses are required for a major. Courses 21, 
22, 35, 36, 45 and three hours selected from approved Economics 
courses are required for a minor. 

11-12 Commercial and Economic Geography 

A study of the environmental basis of society and its influence 
upon civilization. A survey is made of the natural resources, indus- 
tries, and economic conditions of the leading countries of the world, 
with special attenton to the United States. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. Mr. Graham 

15 History of Industrial Development 

This course is a study of the growth of industries, agricultural 
production, transportation, communication, and banking within the 
United States. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Graham 

21-22 Principles of Economics 

A social study of the activities of man to advance materially. 
Different economic activities are given consideration such as a gen- 
eral survey of governmental taxation and expenditures, our banking 
system, the labor situation, business cycles, and proposed measures 
for economic betterment. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. Mr. Graham 

27 Labor Problems 

This is a study of the labor problems from the viewpoint of the 
laborer, the employer, and the public. Recent laws will be considered 
relating to social insurance, pensions, wages, and child and woman 
labor. Special consideration will be given to labor organizations 
and their activities. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Graham 

28 Insurance 

A study of principles and problems of insurance. Consideration 
is given to such subjects as rate making, policies, reserves and legal 
control, with reference to various forms of insurance. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Graham 

32 Business Cycles 

A study of the factors underlying the cyclical movement of busi- 
ness and economic conditions. Attention will be given to the more 
prominent theoretical explanations currently held concerning these 
phenomena. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Reitz 



72 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

33 Public Finance 

A study of the principles and practices underlying the fiscal 
policies of governments. Attention will he given to the effects of 
government expenditures and government taxation. Recent trends 
in government fiscal policies will be given close scrutiny. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Graham 

34 Transportation 

A study of the economic factors underlying the transportation 
industry in this country. Attention will be given to the governmental 
regulation which has come to dominate the industry in this country. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Reitz 

35-36 Economics of Money and Banking 

An analytical survey of the entire field from its earliest conception 
down to modern times. A study will be made of managed currency, 
the stabilized dollar, nationalized banking, and international ex- 
change. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. Mr. Reitz 

43-44 Corporation Finance 

A study of the financial policies of corporations. Attention will 
be given to the problems of both small and large corporations in rela- 
tion to their short and long term capital needs. The latter part of 
the course will deal with the principles underlying investments. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. Mr. Graham 

45 Marketing 

A study of the principles and practices involved in moving goods 
from the various producers to the consumers. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Graham 

48 Foreign Trade 

A study of the theoretical and practical problems involved in the 
sale of goods across national and economic boundaries. A survey 
will be made of world trade resources, markets and exchange prob- 
lems. (Prerequisite: Money and Banking). 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Graham 

50 Seminar 

A course in research procedure and methodology as applied to 

economic and business problems. Students who contemplate entrance 
to a graduate school or affiliation with a business corporation will find 
this course helpful. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Graham and Mr. Reitz 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 73 

EDUCATION 

In Pennsylvania the professional requirements for certification 
are Introduction to Education (3), Educational Psychology (3), 
Practice Teaching (6), and 6 hours elective from History of Educa- 
tion (3), Techniques of Teaching (3), Secondary Education (3), 
Special Methods (2), Visual Education (2). General Psychology 
is a prerequisite to Educational Psychology. The Special Methods 
course must be in the field of either the major or minor. 

In New York state the requirements are met by Educational 
Psychology (3), Technique of Teaching (3), Special Methods (3), 
Practice Teaching (6), and 3 hours elective from History of Educa- 
tion, and Secondary Education. In New Jersey the required courses 
are Educational Psychology, Technique of Teaching, Secondary Edu- 
cation, Special Methods, and History of Education. 

Those who are planning to teach must declare it at the end of the 
Sophomore Year. 

23 Introduction to Education 

An orientation course for all who have signified their intentions 
to become teachers. The evolution of our educational system, teach- 
ing problems, the learning process, the curriculum, changing concep- 
tions of education. School visitation, with written report of observa- 
tions, required of each student. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Galt 

24 Educational Psychology 

A study of the laws, characteristics, and economy of the learning 
process with applications to school subjects. General psychology is 
a prerequisite. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Galt 

31 History and Principles of Education 

A study of the historical developments of education from the early 
beginnings to the present day. Special emphasis on the origin and 
development of American educational institutions. A study of pres- 
ent day tendencies and practices. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Galt 

32 The Technique of Teaching 

The principles underlying the selection and organization of sub- 
ject matter, and the development of skills, habits, ideals and attitudes 
in connection with the various school subjects. Principles that should 
guide the teacher in controlling conduct and building character. 
Each student will be required to teach a demonstration lesson in the 
presence of the instructor and the members of the class. 
Three hours. Three credits. Required of all liberal arts juniors en- 
tering teaching. Mr. Galt 



74 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

33 Secondary Education 

A study of the nature of the growth and development of the physi- 
cal, mental, emotional, moral, and religious life of the pupils begin- 
ning with childhood and extending through adolescence with the 
necessary educational implications. The place of the school in the 
life of the pupil. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Dunkelberger 

44 Visual Education 

Study of audio-visual and other sensory aids in education. Lab- 
oratory work in the use of objects, specimens, graphs, charts, maps, 
pictures, the stereograph, the opaque projector, the film slide, and 
silent and sound motion picture projectors. Offered only in summer 
term. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Galt 

45-46 Practice Teaching 

Observation and practice teaching in the public high schools. Ob- 
servation, conferences, reports, lesson plans, and teaching. A 
laboratory fee is charged. 

Six credits. Mr. Dunkelberger 

Mr. Reitz 

47-48 Methods in Specific Subjects 

Courses in methods are given either in the first or second semester 
by the departments for the purposes of training teachers. It is recom- 
mended that one special methods course in addition to the general 
methods course be taken by each student preparing to teach. Courses 
are offered in English, social studies, mathematics, sciences, commer- 
cial education, and music. 



ENGLISH 

Courses 21, 22, 31, 32, 41, 42, and additional hours chosen from 
courses 33, 34, 35, 36, 43, and 44 to total twenty-four hours are 
required for a major. Courses 21, 22, 31, 32, 41, 42, and additional 
hours chosen from Courses 33, 34, 35, 36, 43, and 44 to total eighteen 
hours are required for a minor. Courses 11, 12, 21, 22 are required 
for the necessary twelve hours of English. 

11-12 Composition 

A year course in the three forms of discourse: narration, descrip- 
tion, and exposition. The instruction aims to aid tin- student to 
express himself clearly and grammatically, and to correct any habit 
of slipshod, inaccurate thinking. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 75 

Laboratory work is designed as a corrective program to provide 
for the student a thoroughly individualized study to meet his special 
personal needs, in addition to his group work in the three recitation 
hours weekly. Students may be excused from the laboratory hour at 
the discretion of the instructor. 

Library Science is also a required part of Composition 11-12 and 
is designed to acquaint the student with the basic library tools, 
through independent research. It consists of one hour a week for 
ten weeks during one semester, and for that semester it will count as 
one-fourth of the final grade in Composition. 

May not be counted toward a major or a minor. 
Three recitation hours, two laboratory hours throughout the year. Six 
credits. Miss North, Mr. Gilbert and Mr. Wilson 

21 Survey of English Literature and Language 

From the beginning to 1800. An historical study of the develop- 
ment of English literature in its various forms and movements, com- 
bined with a study of the English language, its origin, structure, 
relation to other languages, development, borrowings, and general 
history. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Wilson 

22 Survey of English Literature and Language 

From 1800 to the present day. In manner and method, a con- 
tinuation of English 21. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Wilson 

23-24 Journalism 

An introduction to the business of conducting a newspaper, with 
specific practice in reporting, editorial writing, feature article writing, 
make-up, and other activities connected with the weekly appear- 
ance of the college newspaper, The Susquehanna. Open to freshmen, 
but credit given only in the three upper classes. 
One recitation hour throughout the year. Two credits. Mr. Wilson 

25-26 Debating 

The principles of public speaking. The activities of this course 
include organized intercollegiate debates at home and on other cam- 
puses. Open to freshmen, but credit given only in the three upper 
classes. (See Speech). 
One recitation hour throughout the year. Two credits. Mr. Gilbert 

28 Public Speaking 

Emphasis on the practice of speaking in public, together with the 
content and composition of a speech. (See Speech.) 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Gilbert 



76 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

31 American Literature 

From the beginning to Henry James. An historical study of the 
various forms and movements of our native writing. Alternates with 
41. Given 1945-46. 

Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Wilson 



32 American Literature 

From Henry James to the present day. A continuation of Eng- 
lish 31. Alternates with 42. Given 1945-46. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Wilson 



33 English Drama 

An historical survey of dramatic literature in England, not in- 
cluding the works of Shakespeare, with attention to European and 
American drama. Alternates with 35. Given 1945-46. 

Two hours. Two credits. MR. Wilson 



34 Contemporary Drama 

British, Continental, and American drama from Ibsen to the 
present day. Alternates with 36. Given 1945-46. 

Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Wilson 

35 English Novel 

An historical development of the novel from its beginnings to 
the close of the nineteenth century, with particular emphasis on its 
development in England. Alternates with 33. Given 1944-45. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Wilson 

36 English Novel 

A study of a group of novels representative of phases of develop- 
ment in the contemporary British novel from Henry James to Vir- 
ginia Woolf. Alternates with 34. Given 1944-45. 

Two hours. Two credits. MR. WILSON 

41 Shakespeare 

Plays before 1600. Particular study of the comedies and his- 
tories, with a careful consideration of Shakespeare's workmanship. 
Alternates with 81. Given 1944-45. 

Two hours. Ttvo credits. Mr. Wilson 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 77 

42 Shakespeare 

Plays after 1600. Particular study of the tragedies, through 
Shakespeare's manner and method of composition. Alternates with 
32. Given 1944-45. 

Two hours. Two credits. MR. Wilson 

43 English Poetky 

Prom 1500 to 1798. An historical survey of poetry in England 
from the early Renaissance to the Romantic Movement. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Wilson 

44 English Poetry 

Prom 1798 to the present day. A continuation of 43. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Wilson 



FRENCH 

Miss Kline 

Courses 45 and 46 and electives in advance of 11-12 to make a 
total of 24 hours are required for a major. 

Courses totaling 18 hours in advance of 11-12 are required for 
a minor. Students planning to teach should include courses 45 and 
46 in the 18 hours. 

Students choosing a Prench major are urged to elect a minor in 
another foreign language. It is also recommended that they elect 
related courses in history, art, philosophy, and other languages and 
literature. 

11-12 Elementary French 

A course in pronunciation, in the elements of grammar with oral 
and written exercises to illustrate their application, and in reading, 
writing and speaking simple French. For students who have had 
one year of French or no French in high School. May not be counted 
toward a major. 

Four hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

21-22 Intermediate French 

A careful review of grammar. Practice in speaking and writing 
French. Special emphasis on the reading of the short story and the 
drama. Prerequisite, French 11-12 or two years of high school 
French. 

Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 



78 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

31-32 Survey of French Literature 

A study and comparison of the main currents of French literature 
from the Renaissance to the present day. Lectures, collateral read- 
ing, translation and discussion. Prerequisite: French 21-22 or four 
years of high school French. 

Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 



33-34 French Lyric Poetry 

A critical study of French lyric poetry and its evaluation from 
Villon to Verlaine. Parallel reading in French criticism. Prere- 
quisite: French 31-32. Alternates with 41-42. 

Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

41-42 French Novel 

An historical and critical study of the French novel of the 17th, 
18th and 19th centuries. Lectures, translation, and discussion. 
Alternates with 33-34. 

Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 



43-44 French Drama 

A critical study of the development of the French drama during 
the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries. Lectures, collateral reading, 
translation and discussion. Prerequisite: French 31-32. Alternates 
with 45-46. 

Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 



45 Phonetics 

A course designed to aid the student in the proper pronunciation 
of French. Includes a study of the alphabet of the International 
Phonetics Association. Prerequisite: French 21-22. Alternates 
with 43. 
Three hours. Three credits. 



46 Composition and Conversation 

Designed for students who desire a structural knowledge of the 
French language. Aims to develop facility in the use of the spoken 
and written language. Prerequisite: French 21-^l'. Alternates 
with 44. 

Three hours. Three credits. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 79 

GENERAL SCIENCE 

11-12 Science Survey 

The first semester's work includes a survey of the physical sciences 
with applications to modern life. The second semester's work in- 
cludes a survey of the biological sciences as aids in man's cultural 
development. 

Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

Messrs. Fisher, Scudder 

33 Geology, Structural, Dynamic 

A study of the formations of the earth around us, by lecture, field 
excursions, and laboratory studies. Our surroundings are unusually 
favorable for practical geological studies in the caves, mines, valleys 
and mountains in this region. 

Tiuo recitation hours, two hours of laboratory or field work. Three 
credits. Mr. Fisher 



GERMAN 

Mr. Gilbert 

Courses 21, 22, 41, 42 and electives in advance of 11-12 to com- 
plete a total of 24 hours are required for a major. 

Courses 21, 22, 41, 42 and electives in advance of 11-12 to make 
a total of 18 hours are required for a minor. 



11-12 Beginning German 

A course in the minimum essentials of grammar to make possible 
a good reading knowledge of the language. Reading of simple stories 
with attention to their folklore, history, and characteristic atmos- 
phere. May not be counted toward a major or minor. 

Three or four hours throughout the year. Six credits. 



21-22 Intermediate German 

Military German, Novellen, and poetry will be read. Every effort 
will be made to increase the student's active vocabulary by means of 
composition and conversation. The reading of works outside the 
classroom aids in increasing the understanding of printed German. 

Three hotirs throughout the year. Six credits. 



80 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

31-32 German Drama of the 19th Century 

Emphasis will be placed upon romanticism, realism, and natural- 
ism, the characteristic literary attitudes of the period. The drama 
will be interpreted also as the outgrowth of the personality of such 
writers as Kleist, Grillparzer, Hebbel, "Wagner and Hauptmann. 
Alternates with 33-34. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

33-34 The German ISTovelle of the 19th Century 

The development of this form will be traced by the reading of 
important Novellen of each literary trend of the 19th century. 
Alternates with 31-32. Not given 1945-46. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

41-42 German Composition and Conversation 

A course to give the student an excellent working knowledge of 
German grammar, and to increase his ability to use the spoken and 
the written word. The work will be based largely on texts dealing 
with German life, history and art. 
Two hours throughout the year. Four credits. 

43-44 German Literature of the 18th Century 

Representative works of the period will be read to reveal the per- 
sonality of such writers as Lessing, Goethe and Schiller, and to show 
the development of sentimentalism, storm and stress, classicism and 
romanticism. Alternates with 45-46. 
Two hours throtighout the year. Four credits. 

45-46 History of the German Language and Literature 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the develop- 
ment of the German language and literature. Middle High German 
will be studied and read to make the student conscious of linguistic 
changes. Through contact with works not rend previously, the 
student gains a more comprehensive knowledge of German literature. 
Recommended only for majors. Alternates with 43-44. Not given 
1945-46. 
Two hours throughout the year. Four credits. 



GREEK Mi:. All 

Courses 11, 12, 21, 22, and any two from 31-32, 33, 34, 35-36, 
43-44, are required for a major. Courses 11. 12. 21, 22, and eleo- 
tives in advance of 21, 22 to make a total <>f 18 hours are required 
for a minor. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 81 

11-12 Elementary Greek 

Emphasis will be laid on the acquisition of a knowledge of the 
fundamental principles of Greek grammar and syntax. Easy selec- 
tions from Greek literature, illustrating the grammar and syntax 
studied, will be read. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

21 Epic Poetry 

Selections from Homer's Iliad with special attention to develop- 
ing facility in reading and in the mastery of syntax. The Greek epos 
is considered as an expression of the thought and general conditions 
of early Greek life. 
Three hours. Three credits. 

22 Prose Literature 

A study of Plato's Apology and Crito or similar writings. Special 
consideration is given to the study of the character of Greek thought 
and the men who taught Greek youth the meaning of "reasoned 
truth." 
Three hours. Three credits. 

31-32 Greek Drama 

Aristophanes, the Clouds; Sophocles, Oedipus Tyr annus and An- 
tigone; Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound; Euripides, Alcestis. As many 
as possible of these selections will be studied with special attention to 
metre and scenic antiquities. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

33 Greek Life and Thought 

A survey of the religious and social life of the ancient Greeks. 
Mythology, its influence on English literature, and on art in general, 
the social life as expressed in the national games, customs, education, 
public life of the citizen, including law and government will be 
studied. Special emphasis will be placed on Greek contributions to 
modern civilization. No knowledge of the Greek language is required 
for this course. 
Two hours. Two credits. 

34 Greek Literature in English 

A survey of Greek literature with an intensive study in English 
translation of literary masterpieces. Text book, recitations, lectures, 
assigned library work, selected from the ancient writers and other 
relevant books. Of interest especially to students of English, the 
classics and history. 
Two hours. Two credits. 



82 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

35-36 New Testament Greek 

A rapid reading course, designated primarily for candidates for 
the ministry and religious workers; a linguistic and historical inter- 
pretation of the New Testament. Selections from the historical and 
didactic literature. Prerequisite, Greek 21, 22, or equivalent. Alter- 
nates with 31 and 32. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

43-44 New Testament Greek 

A continuation of courses 35-36 with different selections. Alter- 
nates with 35-36. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 



HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

The required courses for a major (24 hrs.) are 11-12, 21-22, 31-32 
and 41-42. The required supplementary courses to the major are 
principles of Economics (6 hrs.), Principles of Sociology (6 hrs.) 
The required courses for a minor (18 hrs.) are 21-22, 31-32 and 
41-42, taken in that order if possible. The required supplementary 
course to the minor is Principles of Economics (6 hrs.). Majors 
who feel they may go on to graduate school are urged to take 
Course 44. 

11-12 History of Western Europe 

A survey of the history of Western Europe and the expansion of 
European civilization around the globe. The period covered is from 
the fall of the West Roman Empire to the present. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. Mr. Russ 

13 History of Civilization 

A brief basic survey of the whole field of history. Special 
emphasis is placed on man's cultural achievements in the political, 
social, religious, intellectual, artistic and economic fields. Human 
ideals and institutions are studied in their general outline, and an 
attempt is made to trace the continuity of culture through the cen- 
turies. Recommended for Public School Music students. 
Three hours. Three a-edits. Mr. Ahl 

21-22 American History 

A narrative history which begins with the discovery and carries 

the story to the present. 

Three hours throughout the year. Sis credits. Mr. Russ 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 83 

31-32 American Government 

A study of Federal government during the first semester; state 
and local during the second. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. Mr. Russ 

41 English History 

A general survey with special stress upon those events in English 
history which have influenced American developmnt. Recommended 
to English majors. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Russ 

42 World Problems 

An analysis of the twenty years prior to the opening of World 
War II. The objectives are to study the reasons for the failure to 
create permanent peace after 1918 and to examine the possibilities of 
winning the peace after the present conflict. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Russ 

43 Pennsylvania History 

A survey of Pennsylvania as colony and state. Alternates with 
No. 44. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Russ 

44 Seminar 

A course in historiography and the methods of research. The 
purpose is to teach the student, who intends to go to graduate school, 
the mechanics of historical writing. Alternates with No. 43. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Russ 



LATIN" 

Courses 13-14, 21-22, 31-32, 36 and two courses selected from 
33, 34, 35 are required for a major. Supporting course: 3 hours 
Eoman history. Courses 13, 14, 21, 22, 31, 32 are required for a 
minor. Students majoring or minoring in Latin should elect at 
least one year's work in Greek, and have a reading knowledge of 
either French or German. 

The composition course is required for those who plan to do grad- 
uate work or teach. 

11-12 Beginning Latin 

A study of pronunciation, essential forms, and the principles of 
syntax. The aim of this course is to develop as quickly as possible 
an ability to read Latin in simple texts. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 



84 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

13-14 Intermediate Latin 

Selected orations of Cicero with supplementary reading in Eng- 
lish, Vergil's Aeneid, including a study of the poem as a whole, its 
sources, poetical diction and its mythological background. Prereq- 
uisite, two years of high school Latin. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

21-22 Ovid and Catullus 

Selections from Ovid's Metamorphoses. Shorter poems of Catul- 
lus. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

31-32 Horace 

Selections from Horace's Odes, Epodes, Satires, and Epistles. A 
study of Horace as a satirist, philosopher, lyric poet, and literary 
critic by a representative study of his words. Prerequisite, Latin 13 
and 14, or four years of high school Latin. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

33 Roman Drama 

Selected plays of Plautus and Terence. Collateral reading on the 
origin, development and technique of Roman comedy. Alternates 
with 35. 
Three hours. Three credits. 

34 Roman Historic Writers 

Passages from Livy's Ab Urbe Condita dealing with the mythical 
age of Roman kings. Selections from Suetonius and Tacitus will be 
studied in the light of their contribution to Roman imperial history. 
Alternates with 36. 
Three hours. Three credits. 



35 Martial 

Martial's Epigrams; a study of the epigram as a literary form; 
its source and influence. Alternates with 33. 
Three hours. Three credits. 

36 Latin Language and Prose Composition 

A review of forms and of principles of syntax, drill in reading 
and writing Latin, and a study of Latin style and idiom. Alternates 
with 34. 
Three hours. Three credits. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 85 

MATHEMATICS 

Courses 13, 14, 21, 22, and ten additional hours are required for 
a major. Courses 13, 14, 21, 22, and four additional hours are 
required for a minor. 

11 Introduction to College Mathematics 

An introduction to the study of the elementary mathematical 
functions. 
Five hours. Two credits. Mr. Houtz 

13 College Algebra 

An introduction to the study of elementary algebraic func- 
tions and the solution of equations. Also progressions, permutation 
combinations, probabilities and determinants. 
Five hours. Three credits. Mr. Houtz 

14 Trigonometry 

The study of the trigonometric functions and logarithms with 
application to triangles. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Houtz 

21-22 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 

A study is made of systems of coordinates and the relation between 
equations and loci. The concepts and fundamental formulae of dif- 
ferentiation and integration are studied and applied to problems in- 
volving maxima and minima, lengths, areas and volumes. Prerequi- 
site, Courses 13 and 14. 
Five hours throughout the year. Ten credits. Mr. Robison 

25 Mathematics of Finance (See page 64 for description of this 
course.) 

31 The Foundation of Algebra and Geometry 

A critical analysis of the fundamental concepts and methods of 
reasoning of mathematics. Alternates with 33. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Robison 

32 The Teaching of Mathematics 

A course in the methods of teaching mathematics in the secondary 
schools. Alternates with 34. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Robison 



86 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

33 Advanced Calculus 

A study of the theoretical aspects of calculus, with particular 
emphasis on infinite processes and the concepts of limit and continu- 
ity. Prerequisite, Courses 21 and 22. Alternates with 31. 

Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Robison 

34 Advanced Calculus 

A continuation of Course 33, which is a prerequisite for it. Al- 
ternates with 32. 

Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Robison 

35 Differential Equations 

The formation and geometrical meaning of differential equations 
and the standard methods of solution. Prerequisite, Courses 21 and 

22. 

Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Robison 

37 Navigation 

A descriptive study of the problems of air navigation as outlined 
by the Civil Aeronautics Administration. The course includes a 
detailed study of meteorology insofar as it affects the handling of 
aircraft. Prerequisite, Mathematics 13-14. 

Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Houtz 

38 Surveying 

Classroom work and field practice in the care and use of surveying 
instruments, running lines and levels, establishing grades, plotting 
and computing areas, running profiles and cross sections. Stress is 
put on the use of the plane table and stadia. Prerequisite, Mathe- 
matics 13-14. 

Three hoxirs. Three credits. Mr. Houtz 



39-40 Statistical Methods 

Methods of analyzing and presenting numerical 'lata, with refer- 
ence to probability, averages, and measures of correlation. 

Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. Mr. Robison 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 87 

MUSIC 

21-22 History of Music 

A survey of the development of music from its beginning to the 
present. Current events related to the subject matter of the course 
are brought to the attention of the class. 

Course same as Music 17-18. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. Mrs. Sheldon 

30 Music Appreciation 

A course to develop an intelligent appreciation of music. For 
description, see Music 42. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mrs. Giauque 

The above courses are for Liberal Arts students. For complete 
description of courses offered in the Conservatory of Music, see p. 95. 



PHILOSOPHY 

Courses 31, 32, 33, 34, 41, 42, and Psychology 21, 24, are required 
for a major. 

31 Logic 

The guiding principles and conditions of correct thinking, the 
nature of the deductive and the inductive processes, and the basis of 
the scientific method. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Dunkelberger 

32 Introduction to Philosophy 

An attempt to get a clear understanding of metaphysical reality 
and to present the fundamental facts and principles in relation to 
the categories of thought. 
Three hours. Three credits. MR. DUNKELBERGER 

33 Ancient and Mediaeval Philosophy 

The history of the progress of philosophical thinking from the 
early Greek philosophers to the Renaissance. 
Three hours. Three credits. MR. Ahl 

34 Modern Philosophy 

The history of the progress of philosophical thinking from the 
Renaissance to the present time. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Ahl 



88 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

41 Philosophical Readings 

Selections from the writings of Plato, Aristotle, Epictetus, Cicero, 
Bacon, Hobbes, Descartes, Locke. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Dunkelberger 

42 Modern Philosophers 

The philosophies of James, Royce, Bergson, Dewey, and San- 
tayana. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Dunkelberger 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
COURSES FOR MEN Mr. Stagg 

The war is causing a marked change in the program of required 
classes in Physical Education. The purpose to develop the physical 
well being of the student remains the same, but greater emphasis is 
being placed on rugged health, endurance, strength and agility, as 
goals to attain. In addition, qualities of character such as courage, 
daring, poise under emotional strain, confidence in one's self and 
fair play are being fostered. 

11-12M Physical Education 

Required in all college curricula. Covering the period from the 
opening of college to the Thanksgiving recess, the activities include 
calisthenics, football, soccer, touch football, combative games, track, 
golf and tennis. From the Thanksgiving recess to the spring recess, 
the classes meet in the gymnasium and the work consists of calis- 
thenics, informal gymnastics, basketball, volley ball, indoor baseball, 
handball and boxing. From the spring recess to commencement, the 
activities include calisthenics, soft ball, track, baseball, combative 
games, tennis, hiking and golf. Classroom instruction is assigned. 
Three hours throughout the year. Tivo credits. 

21-22M Physical Education 

Required in all college curricula. The plan and nature of the 
work is similar to Course 11-12. Classroom instruction as assigned. 
Three hours throughout the year. Two credits. 

31-32M Physical Education 

Required in all college curricula. A continuation of course 21-22 
with the privilege of a wider range of sports, and recreational activi- 
ties upon an elective basis. Classroom instruction as assigned. 
Three hours throughout the year. Tivo credits. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 89 

15-16M Physical Education — Restricted Activities 

These courses are planned in consultation with the student's physi- 
cian to meet the needs of individual students who are unable to pur- 
sue the regular courses. Classroom instruction as assigned. 
Two hours throughout the year. Two credits. 

13-14M Personal Hygiene 

This course presents a wide range of materials concerning health- 
ful living. 
One hour throughout the year. Two credits. 



COURSES EOR WOMEN Miss Shure 

11-12W Physical Education 

A foundation course which aims to build a vital interest in team 
games. Hockey, soccer, volley ball, and basketball are played. 
Round Robin Tournament in each activity. Badminton and tennis 
in the second semester. Classroom instruction as assigned. 
Two hours throughout the year. Two credits. 

13-14W Personal Hygiene 

This course presents a wide range of scientific and educational 
materials. Information is presented through lectures, guided dis- 
cussions, surveys, group health projects, and term papers. 
One hour throughout the year. Two credits. 

15-1 6 W Physical Education 

These courses are planned in consultation with the student's phy- 
sician to meet the needs of individual students who are unable to 
pursue the regular courses. Classroom instruction as assigned. 
Two hours throughout the year. Two credits. 

19-20W EURYTHMICS AND FOLK DANCING 

Designed especially to meet the needs of students in the Public 
School Music Course. Course same as Music 19, 20. 
Two hours throughout the year. Two credits in Music Cwn-icula. 

21-22W Physical Education 

A course designed to improve fundamental skills and technique 
throughout the team games. A wide range of folk dance material is 
presented in the second semester. Instruction in tennis. 
Two hours throughout the year. Two credits. 



90 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

3 1-32 W Physical Education 

A course similar in nature to 21-22W. Classroom instruction as 
assigned. Badminton and Archery in the second semester. Tourna- 
ments and meets will be planned by students. 
Two hours throughout the year. Two credits. 

41-42 Physical Education 

A course which emphasizes leadership in team games. The 
students plan and manage the intramural program. Instruction in 
coaching and officiating. Tap dancing and golf instruction will be 
given in the second semester. 
Two hours throughout the year. Two credits. 



PHYSICS Mr. Robison 

Courses 11-12 or 13-14 and 16 semester hours of advanced physics 
are required for a major. The selection of these courses and sup- 
porting fields is to be made in conference with the professor of 
physics in accordance with the student's aims and ability. Courses 
11-12 or 13-14 and 10 semester hours of advanced physics are re- 
quired for a minor. 

11 Introductory Physics 

A course in mechanics, heat and sound. Prerequisites, plane 
geometry and algebra. 
Three lectures, one double laboratory period per week. Four credits. 

12 Introductory Physics 

A continuation of Physics 11, taking up electricity, magnetism 
and light. 
Three lectures, one double laboratory period per week. Four credits. 

13 General Physics 

A course in mechanics, heat, and sound. Not open to students 
who have credits in Course 11-12. Prerequisite, trigonometry. This 
course is recommended for all students whose major is physics, 
mathematics, chemistry, or biology. 
Three lectures, one double laboratory period per week. Four credits. 

14 General Physics 

This is a continuation of Physics 11 and 13, taking up electricity 
magnetism, and light. 
Three lectures, one double laboratory period per week. Four credits. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 91 

16 Aerodynamics 

A study of the motion of air and other forces on solids in motion, 
as applied to the theory of flight. 
Two lectures. Two credits. 

21 Sound 

A study of sound and some of the phenomena associated with it. 
Three lectures. Three credits. 

23-24 Eadio 

A study of the principles of radio communication. 
Lectures and laboratory. Six credits. 

31 Light 

A study of the theories of physical optics and an introduction to 
modern spectroscopy. 
Lectures and laboratory. Three or four credits. 

32 Heat 

A study of heat and the laws of thermodynamics. 
Three lectures. Three credits. 

33-34 Introduction to Theoretical Mechanics 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 23, 24; Physics 11, 12, or 13, 14. 
Three lectures throughout the year. Six credits. 

35-36 Electricity and Magnetism 

Prerequisites, Mathematics 23, 24; Physics 11, 12 or 13, 14. 

Three lectures, one double laboratory period throughout the year. Eight 
credits. 



PSYCHOLOGY 

21 General Psychology 

An introductory course covering the entire field, designed to 
develop a scientific attitude toward psychological problems. A 
description of the receiving, connecting, and re-acting mechanisms. 
A survey of the emotions, sense-perception, imagery, attention, rea- 
soning, learning. Behavior is considered as environmental adjust- 
ment. This course is prerequisite for other courses in psychology. 

Three hours, one hour laboratory per week. Three credits. 

Mr. Dunkelberger 

22 Educational Psychology 

A study of the laws, characteristics, and the economy of the 
learning process with application to school subjects. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Galt 



92 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

24 Applied Psychology 

The principles of psychology applied to the vocations, business 
and industry. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Dunkelberger 

33-34 Abnormal Psychology and Mental Hygiene 

A study of personality traits, attitudes, emotions, inhibitions, 
complexes and the conditions requisite for mental health; abnormal 
mental conditions, forms of insanity, and mental deficiency. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. Mr. Dunkelberger 

41 Social Psychology 

A study of the interaction of individuals in their several group 
relations, the contacts of harmony, and conflict within groups as well 
as between groups, group controls, and the phenomena of imitation 
and suggestion. Course same as Sociology 41. 
Three hours. Three credits. 

43 Psychological Tests and Personnel Techniques 

The theory and practical application of individual and group 
psychological tests and personnel techniques. 
Three hours. Three credits. 

44 Childhood and Adolescence 

A study of the nature of the growth and development of the 
physical, mental, emotional, moral, and religious life of the pupils 
beginning with childhood and extending through adolescence with 
the necessary educational implications. The place of the school in 
the life of the pupil. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Dunkelberger 

SOCIOLOGY 

21-22 Principles of Sociology Mr. Dunkelberger 

A systematic study of the fundamentals of human society such as 
the social processes, factors, functions, products, and underlying 
principles. Prerequisite : Sophomore standing. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

31-32 Modern Social Problems 

The aim of the course will be to locate the significant problems of 
present-day society and to evaluate the current approaches to them. 
Among these problems are those of population, race, labor, delin- 
quency, poverty and dependence, and problems peculiar to rural and 
urban life. Prerequisite: Sociology 21-22. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 






COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 93 

41 Social Psychology 

A study of the interaction of individuals in their several group 
relations, the contacts of harmony, and conflict within groups as well 
as between groups, group leadership and group controls, the phenom- 
ena of imitation and suggestion. Course same as Psychology 41. 
Prerequisites : Sociology 21-22 ; Psychology 21. 
Three hours. Three credits. 



42 Introduction to Social Work 

An introductory course covering the scope and function of the 
different fields of social work. The work of the classroom is supple- 
mented by special lectures and seminars by officials of the various 
social agencies. 
Three hours. Three credits. 



43 Anthropology 

As a background for the studies of sociology and philosophy, a 
course of three hours is offered in anthropology with special emphasis 
on its cultural aspect. 
Three hours. Three credits. 



4:4: The Family as a Social Institution 

The origin and development of the family, function, and rela- 
tion to other primary and secondary groups ; the problems of family 
life and how to meet them. Prerequisite: Sociology 21. 
Three hours. Three credits. 



SPANISH 

11-12 Elementary Spanish Miss Kline 

A course for students who begin Spanish in college. Minimum 
essentials of grammar, oral work and reading of simple texts. May 
not be counted toward a major. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

21-22 Intermediate Spanish 

A course in grammar, conversation and reading of modern 
Spanish prose. Prerequisite: Spanish 11-12 or two years of high 
school Spanish. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 



94 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

31-32 Survey of Spanish Literature 

Lecture and reading course. Study of representative authors 
with emphasis on the Golden Age and its achievement. Collateral 
Reading. Reports. Discussion. Prerequisite: Spanish 21-22 or 
four years of high school Spanish. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

41 Modern Drama 

Survey of the drama from the romanticists to the present day. 
Readings with reports and discussions of representative works of 
Hartzenbusch, Echegaray, Galdos, Benavente, los Quinteros and 
other authors. Prerequisite : Spanish 31-32. 
Three hours. Three credits. 

42 Modern Novel 

Critical study of literary movements since 1850, as exemplified 
in the works of such novelists as Pardo Bazan, Galdos, Valdes, Pio 
Baroja and Valle Inclan. Prerequisite : Spanish 31-32. 
Three hours. Three credits. 



SPEECH 

25-26 Debating Mr. Gilbert 

The principles of discussion and debate. The activities of this 
course include organized intercollegiate debates. Open to freshmen, 
but credit given only in the three upper classes. 
One recitation hour throughout the year. Tivo credits. 

28 Public Speaking 

Emphasis on the practice of speaking in public, together with the 
content and composition of a speech. 
Three hours. Three credits. 



THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



The Conservatory of Music of Susquehanna University offers 
complete courses of instruction in Pianoforte, Singing, Violin, Organ, 
and Public School Music. The courses are planned with a view to 
developing a high degree of musicianship in students, giving them, 
besides the technique of their special study, that comprehensive insight 
into the nature and structure of music which can be obtained only 
from a practical study of Harmony, Form, and other theoretical 
subjects. 

ENTRANCE CREDITS 

Candidates for the degrees in Music must present entrance credits 
equivalent to a four-year high school course and show evidence of 
aptitude in music. 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

Susquehanna University Conservatory of Music is approved by 
the State Department of Public Instruction for the education of 
supervisors and teachers in Public School Music. 



ORGANIZATIONS 

CONSERVATORY STUDENT ORGANIZATION 

All students taking work in the Conservatory of Music are mem- 
bers of the organization. Officers are elected from among the stu- 
dents, and preside at the meetings of the Recital Class as well as 
other student sessions. All matters pertaining to the welfare of the 
Conservatory of Music are considered through this organization. 

UNIVERSITY BANDS 

The marching band offers opportunity for the schooling of the 
individual marching bandsman in the routine of intricate maneuver 
and drill formation. 

In the concert band standard overtures, suites, and symphonic 
movements of the great masters are studied. Adequate technical 
facility, ability to read music readily, and a feeling for genuine in- 
terpretive skill are emphasized. College credit. 



96 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY ORCHESTRA 

Symphonic orchestral experience is gained in the study of stan- 
dard literature. Instruction is given in orchestral technique and 
methods of rehearsing. Adequate technical facility, ability to read 
music readily, and musicianship are necessary for entrance to this 
orchestra. College credit. 

SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY CHORUS 

This choral group of mixed voices meets two periods per week, 
being a required course for all sophomores and juniors in music. 
College students may elect the course if they desire. Choruses and 
cantatas are studied, and appearances are made in various recitals 
during the year. College credit. 

RULES AND REGULATIONS 

No reduction is made for absence during the first two weeks of 
the semester, nor for subsequent individual absences. 

Pupils may enter at any time, but for convenience in grading, 
the beginning of each semester is the most suitable time. 

All sheet music must be paid for when given out. 

Special holidays declared by the faculty will be observed. Les- 
sons missed because of such action will not be made up by any teacher 
without the consent of the director. 

Students must consult the director before arranging to take part 
in any public musical exercise outside of the regular work. Too 
often students bring unjust criticism on the teacher by appearing 
before an audience without having had sufficient preparation. 

Absence from class or private lessons requires that satisfactory 
excuses shall be offered. Failure in the matter lowers class standing. 

Reports showing attendance, scholarship, deportment, etc., are 
issued at the close of each semester. 

For further information concerning courses, tuition, etc., address 
— Director of the Conservatory of Music, Susquehanna University, 
Selinsgrove, Pa. 

RECITALS 

Students' Evening Recitals — Each semester, recitals arc -iv. n 
in which students who have been prepared under the supervision of 
the instructors take part. These recitals furnish incentives to study 
and experience in public performance. 

Students' RecitaIi Class — Students who are nol sufficiently 

advanced to participate in the Evening Recitals are given experience 
in public performance in the Recital Classes which meet once each 



THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 97 

month. Rules governing stage deportment are brought to the atten- 
tion of the pupils, and topics of general interest to music students 
are discussed. These classes are not open to the public but an excep- 
tion is made in the case of near relatives. 

Artist Recitals — Important to the student of music is the hear- 
ing of compositions of the great masters as interpreted by artists of 
recognized ability. It is the purpose of the management to provide 
such recitals at the University at a nominal cost to the students, as 
•well as to assist in making it possible to hear similar recitals in 
nearby cities. All students registered in the Conservatory of Music 
will be charged for this course, unless excused by the Director for 
good reasons. 

PRACTICE TEACHING 

The Senior Class in Music Education teaches and observes in the 
Public Schools of Sunbury, Selinsgrove, and Middleburg. This work 
is done under the direction of Mrs. Alice H. Giauque, B.S., A.M., 
Instructor in Methods, Susquehanna University; E. Edwin Sheldon, 
Mus.D., Director of the Conservatory of Music, Susquehanna Univer- 
sity; Katherine Reed, Mus.B., Supervisor of Music, Sunbury Public 
Schools; Mrs. June Hendricks Hoke, Supervisor of Music, Selins- 
grove Public Schools. 

COLLEGE CREDIT 

College students may elect any of the theoretical subjects and 
have them count as "college electives." 



98 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

EXPENSES 

For the best results in piano, singing, organ, violin, etc., in which 
individual instruction is given, students should take two periods of 
instruction each week. This is in accordance with the general prac- 
tice of conservatories of music. The university year is divided into 
two semesters of equal length. 

The total charge to boarding students for the year, including 
tuition, board, room rent, and all other fees ranges from $690.00 to 
$710.00 for men, and $690.00 to $730.00 for women. 

The total annual charge to day students, registered for the degree 
ranges from $375.00 up depending on the schedule taken. 

Two hours of daily practice on a piano are included in the above 
rates. Organ practice is an additional expense. Its cost is listed 
under miscellaneous expenses. 

The following tuition rates per semester are quoted for students 
not registered for a degree course. 

PIANO, SINGING, PIPE OKGAN, VIOLIN, etc. 

Freshman and Sophomore Years 

One semester — 2 one-half hour lessons per week $51.00 

One semester — 1 one-half hour lesson per week 25.50 

Junior and Senior Years 

One semester — 2 one-half hour lessons per week $68.00 

One semester — -1 one-half hour lesson per week 34.00 

Sub-Freshman Year 
PIANO, VIOLIN, CLARINET, TRUMPET, TROMBONE, etc. 

One semester — 2 one-half-hour lessons per week $25.50 

One semester — 1 one-half hour lesson per week 12.75 

MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES 

Rent of three-manual organ — one semester, 5 hours per week $25.00 
Rent of three-manual organ — one semester, 2 hours per week 10.00 
Rent of two-manual organ — one semester, 5 bonis per week _ 20.00 
Rent nf two-manual organ — one semester, 3 hours per week _ 12.00 

Rent of piano — one semester, 1 hour each day 5.00 

Rent of piano — each additional hour, one semester 2.00 

Private lessons in all theoretical subject-, each 1.00 

Sight Playing library fee — one semester 1.00 

Rent of any ordiestral instrument, one semester 5.00 

Music theory subjects not taken for credit toward a degree -ball be 
charged at the rate of $10.00 per semester hour. 



THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



99 



COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

Soloist Course 



Freshman Year 



First Semester 



Hrs. Cr. 



Piano, Singing, Organ or 
Orchestral Instruments _ 1 

Second Solo Subject y 2 

Harmony I 3 

History of Music I 3 

Sight Reading I 3 

Music Dictation I 3 

English 11 & Library Sci. _ 4 

Physical Education 2 

Personal Hygiene 1 



Second Semester 



Hrs. Cr. 



Piano, Singing, Organ or 
Orchestral Instruments _ 1 

Second Solo Subject y 2 

Harmony II 3 

History of Music II 3 

Sight Reading II 3 

Music Dictation II 3 

English 12 3 

Physical Education 2 

Personal Hygiene 1 



20 V 2 18 



19 y 2 18 



Sophomore Year 



Piano, Singing, Organ or 

Orchestral Instruments _ 1 

Second Solo Subject y 2 

Harmony III 2 

Sight Reading III 3 

Music Dictation III 3 

Eurythmics I 2 

English 21 (Survey) 3 

General Psychology 3 

Chorus 2 



Piano, Singing, Organ or 
Orchestral Instruments _ 1 

Second Solo Subject y 2 

Harmony IV (Keyboard) _ 2 
Elements of Conducting — 2 

Music Interpretation 2 

Eurythmics II 2 

English 22 (Survey) 3 

Public Speaking 3 

Chorus 2 



19V 2 17 



17 y 2 17 



Junior 

Piano, Singing, Organ or 

Orchestral Instruments _ 1 2 

Second Solo Subject V 2 1 

Harmony V (Form &Anal.) 2 2 
Adv. Instrum. Conducting _ 3 3 

Art Appreciation, 21 3 3 

French or German 3 3 

Sight Playing (Piano) 2 1 

Chorus 2 1 

Junior Recital Preparation _ 2 

16% 18 



Year 

Piano, Singing, Organ or 
Orchestral Instruments _ 1 

Second Solo Subject y 2 

Harmony VI (Composition) 2 

Adv. Choral Conducting 3 

Art Appreciation, 22 3 

French or German 3 

Sight Playing (Piano) ___ 2 

Chorus 2 

Junior Recital _ 



16 y 2 19 



100 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 



Senior Year 
Hrs. Cr. 



Piano, Singing, Organ or 

Orchestral Instruments _ 1 2 

Simple Counterpoint 2 2 

Sight Playing (Piano) 2 1 

French or German 3 3 

Bible I 2 2 

Music Appreciation (Gen.) 2 1 

An Elective 3 3 

Senior Recital Preparation _ 3 

15 17 



Hrs. Cr. 



Piano, Singing, Organ or 

Orchestral Instruments _ 1 2 

Dbl. Counterpoint — Canon _ 3 3 

Sight Playing (Piano) ___ 2 1 

An Elective 3 3 

Bible II 2 2 

Music Appreciation (PSM) 2 1 

Senior Recital 5 



15 17 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MUSIC EDUCATION 



This course has been approved by the State Council of Education 
for the preparation of Supervisors and Teachers of Public School 
Music. 



Freshman Year 



First Semester 



Hrs. Cr. 

Harmony I 3 3 

History of Music I 3 3 

Sight Reading I 3 2 

Music Dictation I 3 2 

English 11 & Library Sc. __ 4 3 

Physical Education I 2 1 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, 
Chorus, Band, and Or- 
chestral Instruments 9 3 

28 18 



Second Semester 



Hrs. Cr. 

Harmony II 3 3 

History of Music II 3 3 

Sight Reading II 3 2 

Music Dictation II 3 2 

English 12 3 3 

Physical Education II 2 1 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, 
Chorus, Band, and Or- 
chestral Instruments 9 3 

27 18 



Sophomore Year 



Harmony III 2 2 

Sight Reading III 3 2 

Music Dictation III 3 2 

Eurythmics I 2 1 

General Psychology 3 3 

History of Civilization 3 3 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, 
Chorus, Band, and Or- 
chestral Instruments 9 3 



Harmony IV (Keyboard) _ 2 
Methods and Materials I __ 4 
Elements of Conducting __ 2 

Eurythmics II 2 

Public Speaking 3 

Survey of English Litera- 
ture (English 22) 3 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, 
Chorus, Band, and Or- 
chestral Instruments 9 



25 16 



25 17 



THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



101 



Junior Year 



Hrs. Cr. 
Harmony V (Form — An- 
alysis) 2 2 

Methods and Materials II 4 3 
Adv. Instrumental Conduct- 
ing 3 3 

Principles of Sociology 3 3 

Introduction to Teaching 3 3 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, 
Chorus, Band, and Or- 
chestral Instruments 9 3 

24 17 



Hrs. Cr. 

Harmony VI (Composition) 2 2 

Methods and Materials III _ 4 3 

Adv. Choral Conducting __ 3 3 

Appreciation of Art 22 3 3 

Educational Psychology 3 3 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, 
Chorus, Band, and Or- 
chestral Instruments 6 2 



21 16 



Music Appreciation (Gen.) 
Bible I 

Science Survey 

Student Teaching and Con- 
ference 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, 
Chorus, Band, and Or- 
chestral Instruments 

History (American) 



Senior Year 

2 1 Music Appreciation (PSM) 2 1 

2 2 Bible II 2 2 

3 3 Educational Measurements 2 2 
Student Teaching and Con- 

8 6 ference 7 6 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, 
Chorus, Band, and Or- 

6 2 chestral Instruments 6 2 

3 3 An Elective 3 3 

24 17 22 16 



INSTRUMENTAL COURSES 

Elementary Class Instruction in Band and Orchestral Instruments 

Students are taught the principles underlying the playing of band 
and orchestral instruments. Problems of class procedure in the pub- 
lic schools are discussed. Ensemble playing is a part of the work 
done. 

String Group — Two hours per week through two semesters. 

Woodwind Group — Two hours per week for two semesters. 

Brass Group — Two hours per week through two semesters. 

Percussion — One hour per week. One semester. 



Advanced Class Instruction in Band and Orchestral Instruments 

Further study may be pursued in Band and Orchestral Instru- 
ments as follows : 

String Choir (Viola, Violoncello, and Bass Viol) 
"Woodwind Choir (Flute, Oboe, and Bassoon) 



102 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Brass Choir (All brass instruments not studied in the elemen- 
tary classes.) 

Junior Band — One hour per week. 

Junior Orchestra — One hour per week. 

Students of the elementary and advanced instrumental classes are 
given an opportunity to play instruments in the Junior Band and 
the Junior Orchestra, an experience of great value. 

Orchestration and Orchestra and Band Technique will be 
offered as eleetives when sufficient demand is made for such courses. 
Smaller Ensembles 

String Trio 

String Quartet 

String Quintet 

Violin Choir 

Brass Ensemble 

Woodwind Ensemble 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

Professor Sheldon (Director), Professor Linebaugh, Mr. Hatz, 

Mrs. Giauque, Mrs. Sheldon, Mrs. Hatz, Miss Potteiger, 

Mr. Haskins, Miss Shure 

11 Harmony I 

A study of first essentials in music; scales, intervals, note and rest 
values, musical terms, etc., thereby laying a foundation for further 
harmonic writing and musical development. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mrs. Hatz 

12 Harmony II 

The supertonic, submediant, and mediant harmonies, with their 
sevenths and their inversions as well as simple chromatic alterations 
are studied. Melody writing and melodic invention using these 
simpler harmonies are a part of this semester's work. 

Three hours. Three credits. Mrs. Hatz 

13 Sight Reading I 

Students read at sight music of moderate difficulty, using the 
sol-fa syllables as well as words. Tone and rhythm are stressed. 

Three hours. Two credits. Miss Potteiger 



THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 103 

14 Sight Reading II 

The work of the first semester is continued introducing chromatics 
and more difficult intervals and rhythms. Two and three-part songs 
with words add to the interest of this course. 

Three hours. Two credits. Miss Potteiger 

15 Dictation I 

A study of tone and rhythm enabling the student to sing and write 
melodic phrases which have first been visualized. 

Three hours. Two credits. Mr. Linebaugh 

16 Dictation II 

Melodic dictation is continued throughout this semester, stressing 
the development of memory in writing longer phrases with melodic 
and rhythmic accuracy. 

Three hours. Two credits. Mr. Linebaugh 

17 History of Music I 

The development of music from its beginnings to the period of the 
classical composers is covered in this semester. Current Events are 
brought to the attention of the class each week and students are 
encouraged to do such reading in the library. 

Three hours. Three credits. Mrs. Sheldon 

18 History of Music II 

Music and musicians from the classical period to the present, to- 
gether with current events, are given serious consideration. 

Three hours. Three credits. Mrs. Sheldon 

19 Eurythmics I 

This course aims to enrich and develop the individual's musical 
ability by stimulating his bodily responses. The student learns to 
interpret meter, rhythm, and phrasing not as a mathematical prob- 
lem but as movement. 

Two hours. One credit. Miss Shure 

20 Eurythmics II 

Built upon the foundation of Eurythmics I, this course demands 
greater skill, concentration, and a vivid imagination in order to 
creatively express and interpret the more complicated rhythms. Em- 
phasis is placed upon the development of balance, relaxation, grace, 
and poise. 
Two hours. One credit. Miss Shure 



104 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

21 Harmony III 

The study of chromatic harmony and chord species is included in 
Harmony III. This material is applied in various types of modu- 
lation. Original melody writing and modulation using the material 
are a part of the course. 

Two hours. Tivo credits. Mr. Hatz 



22 Harmony IV 

Knowledge of diatonic harmonies, non-chordal tones, easy chro- 
matic chords, and modulation, are applied to the keyboard. Included 
in the course are transposition, sequences, and creative work at the 
keyboard. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Hatz 

23 Sight Reading III 

This course presupposes that the student has satisfactorily com- 
pleted Courses I and II. New material is constantly used, and speed 
and accuracy in reading from the G and F clefs are required. 

Three hours. Two credits. Miss Potteiger 

24 Methods and Materials I 

The work covered in the course includes music materials suitable 
for the elementary grades, textbooks, songs, and classroom music 
procedure. One hour per week will be devoted to "applied methods, 
including observation and preliminary practice teaching in the 
schools. 

Four hours. Three credits. Mrs. Giauque 

25 Dictation III 

Harmonic dictation is designed to develop ability to recognize and 
write chord progressions, making use of the various harmonies as 
they are required. 

Three hotirs. Two credits. Mr. Linebaugh 



26 Elements of Conducting 

Principles of conducting; study of methods of conductors; daily 
practice in adapting these methods to school purposes; score reading 
and program making are points receiving attention. Orchestral and 
choral conducting are a part of the student's experience. 
Two hours. Tivo credits. Mr. Sheldon 



THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 105 

27-28 Chorus Class 

A study of music applicable to high school groups, amateur 
choruses, and choirs. An acquaintance with choral music from Bach 
to the present. Discussion of choral music, voice testing, and ways of 
judging compositions. This course is open to college students. It is 
required of sophomores and juniors in the Music Education Course. 

Mrs. Giauque 

29 Methods and Materials II 

The work covered in the course includes music materials suitable 
for the intermediate grades, textbooks, songs, and classroom music 
procedure. One hour per week will be devoted to "applied methods," 
including observation and preliminary practice teaching in the 
schools. 
Four hours. Three credits. Mrs. Giauque 

30 Methods and Materials III 

A study of music courses for junior and senior high schools. 
Among the problems considered are classification of voices, methods 
of dealing with the adolescent voice, assembly, music clubs, bands 
and orchestras, and routine work pertaining to these departments. 
Four hours. Three credits. Mrs. Giauque 

31 Harmony V 

This course includes a study of the motive, the phrase, period 
forms, two and three-part song forms, rondo forms, sonata form, etc. 
Detailed analysis is presented in connection with each lesson. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Sheldon 

32 Harmony VI 

Included in this course is creative application of material of all 
previous harmony courses. Composition in various vocal and instru- 
mental forms is presented and the best work is given performance 
before the music students. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Sheldon 

33 Advanced Instrumental Conducting 

Consideration of the methods and principles of conducting applied 
to the orchestra and band. Development of baton technique, score 
reading, orchestral playing and the psychology of rehearsing 
ensembles of various sizes and combinations. Orchestral literature 
adaptive to public school work is studied in this course. Opportunity 
is given the student to conduct compositions of different character. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Hatz 



106 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

34 Advanced Choral Conducting 

A more detailed study of the principles of conducting applied to 
choral groups. A discussion of points helpful in the organization 
and direction of church choirs, mixed choruses, a cappella choirs, and 
larger groups producing oratorios. The young conductor is given 
opportunity to appear before groups, acquiring power through such 
experience in this particular field, enabling him to be at ease when 
called on to serve in the capacity of a choral conductor. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Haskins 

35-36 Piano Sight Playing 

Students of the Junior Year who elect to major in Piano or 
Organ are given two periods each week in ensemble playing. Music 
of average difficulty is placed before them for sight reading. 
Two hours throughout the year. Two credits. Mr. Linebaugh 

37 Simple Counterpoint 

Melody against melody is written throughout the five species, be- 
ginning with two-part and continuing up to eight voices. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Linebaugh 

38 Double Counterpoint and Canon 

Counterpoint so written that it may be removed an octave, tenth, 
or twelfth above or below the cantus firmus. Canons (direct imita- 
tion) are written in all intervals and prepare the student for the more 
advanced contrapuntal work in instrumental and vocal fugue. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Sheldon 

39 Instrumental and Vocal Fugue 

Contrapuntal writing reaches its culmination in the Fugue. Two, 
three, four and five voiced fugues are written by the student. Analy- 
sis of fugues by Johann Sebastian Bach is included in this course. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Sheldon 

41 Music Appreciation I (General) 

The development of a critical judgment of music through an 
appreciation of various forms and modes, through recordings and 
renditions by faculty and visiting artists. General appreciation is 
particularly suitable for college students. 
Two hours. One credit. Mrs. Giauque 

42 Music Appreciation II (P.S.M.) 

Methods — An outline course of study on procedure and appli- 
cable materials for the Elementary, Intermediate, and Junior Sigh 
S.-liool. 
Two hours. One credit. Mrs. Giauque 



THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 107 

43-44 Piano Sight Playing 

Students of the senior class who elect to major in piano or organ 
are given two periods per week in ensemble playing similar to that 
in the Junior year, but with music of greater difficulty. 

Two hours throughout the year. Two credits. Mr. Linebaugh 

45-46 Student Teaching and Conference 

The seniors in Music Education observe and do teaching in the 
public schools of Selinsgrove and Sunbury under the supervision of 
their methods instructor and members of the faculty mentioned under 
Practice Teaching. In addition to the student teaching they have 
critic classes and special conferences. 

Mrs. Giauque 

47 Orchestration 

This course is devoted to arranging music for the orchestra and 
implies an intimate knowledge of the range, qualities, and varied 
capabilites of all orchestral instruments. Attention is given to 
scoring; accompaniments for high school choral literature. 

Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Hatz 

48 Orchestra and Band Technique 

Instrumental Teaching Techniques are outlined and these demon- 
strated with groups. Instrumental organization and administration 
including the study of curriculum for instrumental teachers, and 
consideration of the problems of the band and orchestra director are 
herein set forth. 

Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Hatz 

50 Instrumental Technique Class 

A laboratory class designed to give the student opportunity to 
inquire into, discuss, and experiment with the problems and tech- 
niques of teaching and performing which confront the music educa- 
tor on the flute, oboe, bassoon, and percussion. 
One hour. Mrs. Hatz 

52 Educational Measurements 

The measurement of specific capacities or abilities involved in 
the hearing, appreciation and performance of music, based on a 
scientific analysis of elements which function in all music. The 
techniques of administering aptitude tests for the discovering and 
developing of music interest are practised and applied. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Sheldon 



108 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

54 Music Interpretation 

An analysis of the subject of Interpretation as it pertains to a 
singer's repertory and the artist's playing of compositions on musical 
instruments. A discussion of the composer, the artist, and the audi- 
ence in their right relationship to the composition. Recorded music 
used in the classroom. 

Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Sheldon 



PIANOFORTE 

Sub-freshmen — First, Second and Third Grades — The New 
England Conservatory Graded Course for Piano, Books I, II, III 
and Pieces of corresponding difficulty. 

Freshman Year — Scales in parallel and contrary motion mem- 
orized and played. Arpeggios built on the three triad positions. 
Technique, touch, and phrasing. Etudes : Duvernoy, Op. 120 ; 
Czerny, Op. 636 ; Loeschhorn, Op. 52 ; Kohler, Op. 242. Sonatinas 
— Clementi, Op. 36 ; Gurlitt, Op. 54 — The Clavecin Book of Anna M. 
Bach. Pieces of corresponding difficulty. 

Sophomore Year — Scales in Thirds and Sixths memorized and 
played. Arpeggios built on the Diminished Seventh Chord. Technic, 
touch, phrasing, and memorizing. Etudes — Loeschhorn, Op. 66 ; 
Czerny, Op. 299. Schirmer Sonata Album, Vol. 239. (Haydn, 
Mozart, Beethoven.) J. S. Bach-Busoni — Two-part Inventions. 
Pieces of corresponding difficulty. 

Junior Year — Scales in Accents ; scales with two and three notes 
against one and two. Arpeggios built on the Dominant Seventh 
Chord. Technique touch, phrasing, memorizing, interpretation, and 
ensemble playing. Etudes — Cramer's Fifty Selected Studies ; Czerny, 
Op. 740 with metronome. Sonatas — Beethoven. J. S. Bach-Faelton 
— Three-part Studies. Pieces of corresponding difficulty. 

Junior Recital 

Senior Year — Technique, touch, phrasing, memorizing, interpre- 
tation, and ensemble playing. Etudes — Clementi's Gradus ad Par- 
nassum, Chopin's Studies. Sonatas and Concertos by Beethoven, 
Schumann, Mendelssohn, etc. J. S. Bach — Preludes and Fugues. 
Pieces of corresponding difficulty. 

Seyiior Recital 



THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 109 

SINGING 

Introduction — To major in singing, the applicant must possess 
certain qualities and talents requisite to the accomplishments of a 
singer, including a healthy throat. 

Freshman Year — A study of the vocal instrument. Respiration 
and exercises for developing lung capacity. Correct posture and 
plastic exercises for developing freedom of bodily motion. Vowel 
sounds and consonants in definite form. Articulating organs. Hum- 
ming. Vocal Hygiene. Songs in medium compass of voice. Con- 
centration. Memory. Vocal technique based on the major scale. 
Sieber Vocalises. 

Sophomore Year — Routine drill on vocal technique. Major and 
minor scales. Italian diction. Vaccai Studies. Concentration. Song 

literature. Songs Schubert, Brahms, Mozart, Wolf, Handel, and 

Gluck. 

Junior Year — Routine drill on vocal technique. Chromatic 
scale. Phrasing. Embellishments. Panofka vocalises. Vocal style. 
Memory. Concentration, Interpretation. Mimicry. Poise. Songs 
in Italian, French, or German. Songs in English and Latin. 

Junior Recital 

Senior Year — Daily Vocal Drill. Advanced technique. A study 
of the Trill and Messa di Voce. Bordogni vocalises. Mimicry. Song 
literature — classic and modern. Oratorio. Opera. 

Senior Recital 



PIPE ORGAN 

The object of this department is to prepare practical organists for 
the church service as well as concert playing. 

To be admitted to this course the student must have attained a 
reasonable piano technique and fluency. 

Two lessons per week are required for the Sophomore, Junior, and 
Senior years. 

Freshman Year — General outline of the construction of the 
organ. "The Organ" by Stainer. Pedal Studies. Easy Trios by 
Schneider, and other organ composers. Playing of hymns. Easy 
organ pieces. 

Sophomore Year — Dudley Buck's 18 Studies in Pedal Phrasing. 
Organ Trios of moderate difficulty. Little Preludes and Fugues by 
J. S. Bach. A study of organ registration, and playing of hymns 
and easier anthems. Organ pieces of moderate difficulty. 



110 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Junior Year — Technique, interpretation, registration. Truette — 
34 Pedal Studies from J. S. Bach's works. The easier movements 
from Sonatas for Organ by Mendelssohn, Guilmant, etc. Preludes 
and Fugues of moderate difficulty by J. S. Bach and Mendelssohn. 
Advanced anthems and service playing. Pieces of corresponding 
difficulty. 

Junior Recital 

Senior Yeae — Preludes, Toccatas and Fugues by Bach, Guil- 
mant and others. Sonatas and advanced concert pieces by Rhein- 
berger, Widor, Dethier, etc. 

Senior Recital 

VIOLIN 

Sub-freshman Year — S c a 1 e s and Technics — Blumenstengle 
Scales, Bk. 1. Methods — Bang, Pts. 1, and 2, or Hohmann, Bks. 1, 
and 2. Studies— Wohlfahrt, Op. 45, Bk. 1. Kayser, Op. 20, Bk. 1. 
Pieces — 1st 'position 

Freshman Year — Scales and Technics — Blumenstengle Scales, 
Bk. 2. Sevcik School of Bowing, Pt. 1 Studies— Wohlfahrt, Op. 
45, Bk. 2. Kayser, Op. 20, Bk. 2. Wohlfahrt, Op. 74, Bk. 2. 
Pieces — 1st and 3rd positions. 

Sophomore Year — Scales and Technics — Schradieck Scales. 
Sevcik, Op. 1, Bk. 3. Sevcik School of Bowing, Pts. 1 and 2. Studies 
—Kayser Op. 20, Bk. 3. Mazas, Op. 36, Bk. 1. Sitt, Op. 22, Bk. 3 
or Kayser, Op. 57. 
Solos — 1st and 5th positions. 

Junior Year — Scales and Technics — -Schradieck Scales. Schra- 
dieck School of Violin Technics, Pt. 1. Sevcik, Op. 8 and 9. Studies 
—Mazas, Op. 36, Bk. 2. Dont, Op. 37. David, The Advanced Stu- 
dent, Pt. 2. Sonatas and Concertos by Viotti, Mardini, Bach, and 
Mozart. 

Junior Recital 

Senior Year — Scales and Technics — Schradieck Scales. Casorti 
Op. 50. Dancla, Op. 74. School of Velocity. Studies. Florillo, 36 
Caprices. Kreutzer, 42 Studies. Rode, 24 Caprices. Sonatas and 
Concertos by Mendelssohn, Bruch, Wieniawski, and Viotti. 

Senior Recital 

THE SECOND "SOLO SUBJECT" 

Candidates for graduation in piano shall have taken at least two 
years in voice, violin, or organ. For graduation in voice, violin, or 
organ, the studenl shall have completed the Sophomore requirements 
in piano. 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



The first Alumni Association at Susquehanna University was 
organized June 4, 1884. The Association now embraces 2,700 alumni 
and former students; 35% are teachers, 12% ministers, 8% business 
men, 3% physicians, 3% lawyers; and all of the leading professions 
are represented. Susquehanna alumni are located in thirty-six states 
and many foreign countries. There are eighteen district alumni 
clubs active in Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Dis- 
trict of Columbia, Maryland, and California. There are also eight 
state and sectional districts comprising all of the United States. 

The Susquehanna University Alumni Association is governed by 
the Association officers and Alumni Council. The Association pub- 
lishes a fine Alumni Quarterly, sponsors an annual Alumni Fund, and 
organizes alumni affairs in the districts and on the campus. 

Alumni Officers 

Honorary President, Dr. John I. "Woodruff, '88 Selinsgrove 

President, William A. Janson, '20 , York 

First Vice-President, Addison E. Pohle, '27 Altoona 

Second Vice President, Harry M. Rice, '26 Bloomfield, N. J. 

Recording Secretary, Samuel R. Frost, '26 Selinsgrove 

Treasurer, Dr. George E. Fisher, '88 Selinsgrove 

Statistician, Edwin M. Brungart, '00 Selinsgrove 

Alumni Council Executive Committee 

"William A. Janson, Chairman, '20 York 

George E. Fisher, '88 Selinsgrove 

Mary A. Phillips, '10 Selinsgrove 

W. Latimer Landes, '11 York 

Samuel R. Frost, '26 Selinsgrove 

Addison E. Pohle, '27 Altoona 

Alumni Fund Committee 

William A. Janson, Chairman, '20 York 

George E. Fisher, Treasurer, '88 Selinsgrove 

President G. Morris Smith Selinsgrove 

Marion S. Schoch, '06 Selinsgrove 



112 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Samuel R. Frost, '26 Selinsgrove 

A. M. Stamets, '19 Harrisburg 

Dan Smith, Jr., '97 Williamsport 

Grace Geiselman, '09 Hanover 

Edith Frankenfield, '34 Philadelphia 

Reed Speer, '32 Pittsburgh 

H. Vernon Blough, '31 Arendtsville 



LADIES' AUXILIARY OF SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

On February 4, 1922, a group of ladies directly interested in the 
growth of Susquehanna University met in Seibert Hall and effected 
an organization known as the Ladies Auxiliary of Susquehanna 
University. 

The aim of the Auxiliary is to promote the interests of Susque- 
hanna Unversity both spiritually and financially, and to support 
such undertakings as shall be authorized by the general body. 

Six sub-auxiliaries have been formed. Mount Carmel, April 10, 
1937, Lewistown, April 26, 1937, Johnstown, May 1, 1938, Williams- 
port, October 17, 1940, Hazleton, October 22, 1940, and Harrisburg, 
February 25, 1941. 

It is hoped that through the activities of these auxiliaries, aid may 
be given in more extensive advertising, in the improvement of condi- 
tions in the buildings and on the campus, and in general work for a 
greater Susquehanna. 



DEGREES CONFERRED AND 
LIST OF STUDENTS 



DEGREES CONFERRED IN 1943 
HONORARY DEGREES 

The Reverend Russell Frank Auman Doctor of Divinity 

The Reverend Dallas Clay Baer Doctor of Divinity 

Calvin Victor Erdly Doctor of Pedagogy 

DEGREES IN COURSE 
Bachelor of Arts 

Pierce Allen Coryell Selinsgrove 

Mary Christine Cox** Newport 

William Oliver Curry Ashland 

John Adrian Galski Hazleton 

William H. Gould Flemington 

James Ware Hall Johnstown 

Josiah Lester Houser, Jr. Middleburg 

Sidney Randell Kemberling Selinsgrove 

Grace Helen Leffler Dubendorf Sunbury 

Keith Gordon Lozo Wildwood, 1ST. J. 

Richard Eugene Matthews Williamsport 

Edward Egan Miller Sunbury 

Martin Luther Musselman, Jr. Selinsgrove 

Donald Frederick Spooner Geneva, N. Y. 

Robert Calvin Stahl Turbotville 

Mary Aberdeen Weeks Selinsgrove 

Harry Lyman Wilcox Canton 

Marjorie Alyce Wolfe* Selinsgrove 

John Edward Zubak Trafford 

Bachelor of Science 

Feme Charlotte Arentz Hanover 

Herbert Henry Holderman Shenandoah 

Lawrence Martin Isaacs Shavertown 

♦Graduated Magna Cum Laude. 
**Graduated Cum Laude. 



114 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

June Alice Jerore Lemoyne 

Kenneth Henry Klinger Herndon 

Ethel Mae Kniffin Marlboro, N. Y. 

Fern Elizabeth Lauver Richfield 

Ruth Eleanor McCorkill Northumberland 

Elnora Emagean Pensyl Elysburg 

John Vincent Walsh Lopez 

Dorothy Mae Webber Scranton 

Dorothy Elaine Williamson Davidsville 

Evelyn Romaine Williamson Davidsville 

John Edmund Wolfe Northumberland 

Bachelor of Science in Music Education 

Ruth Elizabeth Billow Catawissa 

Eileen Virginia Boone York 

Jean Melba Bowers Landisburg 

Dorothy Mae Dellecker Frackville 

Louise McWilliams Danville 

Clark Gift INTevin Sunbury 

Lorraine Ellen Turnbach Sugarloaf 

Jessie May Walton Pottsville 

Doris Mae Welch Sunbury 



Prize Awards for 1943 

The Charles E. Covert Memorial Prize 
Herman Gustav Stuempfie Hughesville 

The Stine Mathematical Prize 
Mary Elizabeth Mover Middleburg 

The Sigma Alpha Tola National Fraternity Music Prize 
Dorothy Mae Dellecker Frackville 

Omega Delta Sigma Sorority Scholarship Prize 
Marjorie Alyce Wolfe Selinsgrove 

Kappa Delta Phi Sorority Scholarship Prize 
Mary Christine Cox Xewport 






LIST OF STUDENTS 115 

Senior Class 1943-44 

Olive Ruth Atherton Hunlock Creek 

Geraldine Elizabeth Bemiller Hanover 

Catherine Josephine Byrod Steelton 

Norma Leona Frank Allentown 

Margaret Anna Gemmill York 

Susan Lee Goyne Ashland 

Roy A. Gutshall Mechanicsburg 

Doris Elaine Haggarty Hawley 

Helen Jean Harris Lewistown 

Helen Louise Hocker Whitemarsh 

Janet Elizabeth Hoke Delta 

Henry Francis Hopkins Snydertown 

Florence Emily Houtz Selinsgrove 

Robert Murdock Hunter West Pittston 

William Albert Janson, Jr. York 

Lois Myers Kramer Mahanoy City 

Charles Peter Lamon, Jr. Sunbury 

Roy Edward Leader Northumberland 

James Richard Lepley Winfield 

Fred Leroy Lower Sunbury 

Jean Hilda Renfer Pittston 

Ada Jayne Romig Beaver Springs 

Janet Irene Secrist Millerstown 

Elinor Jane Stitt York 

Ethel Louise Wilson Drums 

Phyllis Leone Wolfe Mill Hall 

Nadia Elaine Zaremba Mt. Carmel 

Junior Class 

Ralph Stanley Aucker Port Trevorton 

Mary Elizabeth Basehoar Littlestown 

Frances Madalon Bittinger Selinsgrove 

Ruth Graybill Botdorf Harrisburg 

John Robert Gehman Port Trevorton 

William Anstead Hays Johnstown 

David Jacob Heim Cogan Station 

Corinne Lillian Kahn Bloomfield, N. J. 

John Joseph Kocsis South River, N. J. 

Natalie Louise Kresge Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Jack Cramer Levy West Pittston 

Gloria Gilda Machamer Wiconisco 

Mary Elizabeth Moyer Middleburg 

Howard Payne Taylor 

George Morris Smith Selinsgrove 

Harold Roy Snyder Selinsgrove 

Robert W. Surplus Gouldsboro 

Margaret Elizabeth Walter Milton 

John Daniel Warner Schuylkill Haven 

Sophomore Class 

Marjorie Barton Picture Rocks 

Carmen Marie Beckwith Scranton 

Emily Lou Botdorf Harrisburg 



116 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Katherine Jane Bowman Williamsport 

Ruth Findlay Cochrane Bloomfield, N. J. 

Christobel Alice Couldren Selinsgrove 

Ruth Esther Garman Mt. Pleasant Mills 

Gloria Elvira Gasparoli Marlboro, N. Y. 

Jean Cornwell Geiger Williamsport 

M. Jean Gilbert Hazleton 

Eula Virginia Hallock Milton, N. Y. 

Norma Jane Hazen Sunbury 

Donald LeRoy Herrold Port Trevorton 

June Louise Hoffman Hazleton 

Jessie Alma Innis Academia 

Geneva Keller Pottstown 

Jean La Rue Kinzer Newport 

Marie Agnes Klick Wind Gap 

La Verne Jane Kohn Merchantville, N. J. 

Celo Vincent Leitzel Richfield 

Kenneth Donald Loss Penns Creek 

Dorothy May Macarow Lattimer Mines 

Jane Rowe Malkames Hazleton 

Anna Catherine Miller Selinsgrove 

Janet Louise Rohrbach Sunbury 

Charlotte Smith Morrisville 

Patricia Eleanor Snyder Sunbury 

Hope Beatrice Spicer New Providence, N. J. 

Marjorie Joan Stapleton Tamaqua 

Dorothy Louise Sternat Biglerville 

Jean Louise Strausser Mt. Carmel 

Bernard Stanley Swiencki Glen Lyon 

Joseph Taylor Wildwood, N. J. 

Ira Allen Wasserberg Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Jean Nancy Wheat Cedar Grove, N. J. 

Marian Arlene Willard Coatesville 

Elizabeth Jane Wilt McAlisterville 

Rine Grabill Winey Selinsgrove 

Almon Franklin Wolfe Pottstown 

Anna Elizabeth Ziegler Selinsgrove 



Freshman Class 

Jacqueline Lee Braveman New York, N. Y. 

Gayle Virginia Clark Upper Darby 

June Lucille Condo Milroy 

Naomi Elizabeth Day Red Lion 

Helen Ann Eby Newport 

Ferae Disque Eriksen Brooklyn, N. Y. 

June Audrey Fisher New York, N. Y. 

Dorothy Bower Foulk Hanover 

Catherine Mary Fox Bloomfield, N. J. 

Corinne Frances Frey Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Lenore Kathleen Garman Selinsgrove 

Mary Elizabeth Gohl Williamsport 

Sara Jane Gundrum Rock\vn<><! 

Marianna Hazen Sunbury 

Adele Anne Heithoff New York, N. Y. 

Betty Jane Herr Hazleton 



LIST OF STUDENTS 117 

Jacqueline Marie Jacques Selinsgrove 

Roswell James Johns Honesdale 

Carol Alice Joyce Hamburg, N. Y. 

Dorothy Jupina McAdoo 

Ella Jean Kelly Hackettstown, N. J. 

Charlotte Elise Kircher Plainfield, N. J. 

Geraldine I. Lebo Millersburg 

Selena Helen Lehman Sunbury 

Emily Mae Leiby Catawissa 

Grace Mary Lemon Williamsport 

Helen Virginia Lepley Winfield 

Mary Ann Lizzio Conemaugh 

Rubye Nita Meyers Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Sara Jane Mitke Sunbury 

Wanda Marie Musser Selinsgrove 

Nancy Elizabeth Myers Elizabethtown 

Aldo Pescarmona New York, N. Y. 

Carolyn Nancy Pfahler Myersdale 

Daniel Irvin Reitz, Jr. Selinsgrove 

Louise Helen Schlick Kingston 

Fae Lucille Smith Mifflintown 

Martha Jane Troutman Elizabethville 

Marie May Talbot Reading 

Elise Claire Thompson Lynbrook, N. Y. 

Dorothy Virginia Wagner Aldan 

Marian Anna Walker Bloomfield, N. J. 

Lawrence John Weller Aristes 

Jean Helen Wentling Merchantville, N. J. 

Evelyn Fay Wilhour Selinsgrove 

Ruth Elizabeth Williams Bloomfield, N. J. 

Alma Doris Williamson Holsopple 

Adah Arlene Wolfe Mill Hall 



Special Students 

Rosalie Fletcher Colhoun New York, N. Y. 

Calvin Conrad Sunbury 

Miriam Louise Garth Williamsport 

James W. Hall Selinsgrove 

John Hoffman Selinsgrove 

Horace Kaufman Selinsgrove 

Lucy Tyler Northumberland 

Summer Session 1943 

Unless otherwise noted, these students attended both sessions of the 
Summer Session. 

Dorothy Elizabeth Artz** Elizabethville 

Olive Ruth Atherton Hunlock Creek 

George P. Bailey* Selinsgrove 

George Mott Bass Upper Darby 

H. Vernon Blough** Selinsgrove 

♦Attended first term only. 
♦♦Attended second term only. 



118 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 



Kathryn Jane Bowman** Williamsport 

Grace Leffler Dubendorf Sunbury 

Phyllis Jane Free Mifflintown 

Miriam Louise Garth Williamsport 

Margaret Anna Gemmill York 

Kathe Frieda Hansen** Wapwallopen 

Samuel Benjamin Haupt Trevorton 

David Jacob Heim Cogan Station 

Florence Emily Houtz Selinsgrove 

Robert Murdock Hunter West Pittston 

William Albert Janson York 

La Verne Jane Kohn Merchantville, N. J. 

Charles Peter Lamon Sunbury 

Roy Edward Leader Northumberland 

Selena Helen Lehman Sunbury 

Celo Vincent Leitzel Richfield 

Kenneth Donald Loss Penns Creek 

Eleanor Letitica Lyons Forty Fort 

Janet Louise Rohrbach Sunbury 

John P. Senko** Hazleton 

George Morris Smith Selinsgrove 

Patricia Eleanor Snyder Sunbury 

Roy H. Soyster* Selinsgrove 

Herman Gustave Stuempfle Hughesville 

Rex Hostetter Sunday Millersburg 

Bernard Stanley Swiencki Glen Lyon 

Ira Allen Wasserberg Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Mary Aberdeen Weeks** Selinsgrove 

Anna Voytek Ziegler Selinsgrove 



LIST OF STUDENTS 119 

DEGREES CONFERRED IN 1944 
HONORARY DEGREES 

Carl Carruer Doctor of Letters 

Conrad Rickter Doctor of Letters 

DEGREES IN COURSE 
Bachelor of Arts 

George Mott Bass Upper Darby 

Geraldine Elizabeth Bemiller Hanover 

Catherine Josephine Byrod Steelton 

Margaret Anna Gemmill York 

Susan Lee Goyne Ashland 

Roy Allen Gutshall Mechanicsburg 

Doris Elaine Haggarty Hawley 

David Jacob Heim Cogan Station 

Henry Francis Hopkins Snydertown 

Florence Emily Houtz* Selinsgrove 

Robert Murdock Hunter West Pittston 

William Albert Janson, Jr. York 

Charles Peter Lamon, Jr. Sunbury 

Roy Edward Leader Northumberland 

James Richard Lepley Winfield 

Fred Leroy Lower Sunbury 

Jean Hilda Renfer Pittston 

Ada Jayne Romig Beaver Springs 

Raymond Robert Schramm Bloomfield, N. J. 

George Morris Smith Selinsgrove 

Herman Gustav Stuempfle, Jr. Hughesville 

Nadia Elaine Zaremba Scranton 

Bachelor of Science 

Olive Ruth Atherton Hunlock Creek 

Helen Jean Harris Lewistown 

Janet Elizabeth Hoke Delta 

Bachelor of Science in Music Education 

Katherine Heldt Aucker Selinsgrove 

Norma Leona Frank Allentown 

Helen Louise Hocker Whitemarsh 

Lois Myers Kramer Mahanoy City 

Janet Irene Secrist Millerstown 

Elinor Jane Stitt York 

Ethel Louise Wilson Kis-Lyn 

Phyllis Leone Wolfe Mill Hall 

♦Graduated Summa Cum Laude. 



120 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Prize Awards for 1944 

The Charles E. Covert Memorial Prize 
David Jacob Heim Cogan Station 

The Stine Mathematical Prize 
Jean Cornwell Geiger Williamsport 

The Sigma Alpha Iota National Fraternity Music Prize 
Janet Irene Secrist Millerstown 

Omega Delta Sigma Sorority Scholarship Prize 
Geraldine Elizabeth Bemiller Hanover 

Kappa Delta Phi Sorority Scholarship Prize 
Margaret Anna Gemmill York 

The Trustees Scholarship 
Florence Emily Houtz Selinsgrove 

Senior Class 1944-45 

Mary Elizabeth Basehoar Littlestown 

Frances Madalon Bittinger Selinsgrove 

Ruth Garybill Botdorf Harrisburg 

Miriam Louise Garth Williamsport 

William Anstead Hays Johnstown 

Corinne Lillian Kahn Bloomfield, N. J. 

Jean LaRue Kinzer Newport 

John Joseph Kocsis South River, N. J. 

LaVerne Jane Kohn Merchantville, N. J. 

Natalie Louise Kresge Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Celo Vincent Leitzel Richfield 

Gloria Gilda Machamer Wiconisco 

Mary Elizabeth Moyer Middleburg 

Howard Reese Payne Taylor 

Harold Roy Snyder Selinsgrove 

Patricia Eleanor Snyder Sunbury 

Robert W. Surplus Gouldsboro 

Ira Allen Wasserberg Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Margaret Elizabeth Walter Milton 

Marian Arlene Willard Coatesville 

John Daniel Warner Schuylkill Haven 



LIST OF STUDENTS 121 

Junior Class 

Marjorie Barton Picture Rocks 

Carmen Marie Beckwith Scranton 

Emily Lou Botdorf Harrisburg 

Ruth Findlay Cochrane Bloomfield, N. J. 

Gloria Elvira Gasparoli Marlboro, N. Y. 

Jean Cornwell Geiger Williamsport 

Eula Virginia Hallock Milton, N. Y. 

Norma Jane Hazen Sunbury 

Donald LeRoy Herrold Port Trevorton 

June Louise Hoffman Hazleton 

Roswell James Johns Honesdale 

Marie Agnes Klick Wind Gap 

Jane Rowe Malkames Hazleton 

Anna Catherine Miller Selinsgrove 

Janet Louise Rohrbach Sunbury 

Charlotte Smith Morrisville 

Hope Beatrice Spicer New Providence, N. J. 

Marjorie Joan Stapleton Tamaqua 

Dorothy Louise Sternat Biglerville 

Bernard Stanley Swiencki Glen Lyon 

Jean Nancy Wheat Cedar Grove, N. J. 

Rine Graybill Winey Selinsgrove 

Almon Franklin Wolfe Pottstown 

Sophomore Class 

Jacqueline Lee Braveman New York, N. Y. 

Gayle Virginia Clark Upper Darby 

Leah Marguerite Cryder Woolrich 

Naomi Elizabeth Day Red Lion 

Helen Ann Eby Newport 

Dorothy Bower Foulk Hanover 

Catherine Mary Fox Bloomfield, N. J. 

Corinne Frances Frey Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Lenore Kathleen Garman Selinsgrove 

Arthur J. Gelnett Selinsgrove 

Mary Elizabeth Gohl Williamsport 

Sara Jane Gundrum Rockwood 

Marianne Hazen Sunbury 

Betty Jane Herr Hazleton 

Dorothy Jupina McAdoo 

Ella Jean Kelly Hackettstown, N. J. 

Selena Helen Lehman Sunbury 

Emily Mae Leiby Catawissa 

Grace Mary Lemon Williamsport 

Helen Virginia Lepley Winfield 

Mary Ann Lizzio Conemaugh 

Rubye Nita Meyers Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Nancy Elizabeth Myers Elizabethtown 

Aldo Pescarmona New York, N. Y. 

Carolyn Nancy Pfahler Meyersdale 

Louise Helen Schlick Kingston 

Fae Lucille Smith Mifflintown 



122 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Marie May Talbot Reading 

Joseph Taylor Wildwood, N. J. 

Elise Claire Thompson Lynbrook, N. Y. 

Martha Jayne Troutman Elizabethville 

Dorothy Virginia Wagner Aldan 

Marian Anna Walker Bloomfield, N. J. 

Lawrence John Weller Aristes 

Evelyn Fay Wilhour Selinsgrove 

Ruth Elizabeth Williams Bloomfield, N. J. 

Alma Doris Williamson Holsopple 

Adah Arlene Wolfe Mill Hall 



Freshman Class 

Joan Apple Sunbury 

Frosta Mary Arseniu Lewistown 

Cora Mae Arthur Hughesville 

Maxine Joan Asch Scarsdale, N. Y. 

Bessie Margaret Bathgate State College 

Nancy Lou Bicking Hazleton 

Aria Mae Bilger Kreamer 

Florien Raye Bilger McClure 

Ronald Herbert Boyer Pillow 

David Edward Bomboy Bloomsburg 

Russell Franklin Brown Roaring Spring 

Anita Charlotte Burk New York, N. Y. 

Joyce Burkhard Freeport, N. Y. 

Angela Victoria Campo New York, N. Y. 

Cynthia Hope Carmel Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Beatrice Ruth Criswell Philadelphia 

La May Cross Upper Darby 

Lois Christine Dauberman Nemacolin 

Virginia Audrey Doss Cranford, N. J. 

Dawn June Ebert Shamokin Dam 

Edith Dorothy Eilhardt Dalton 

Myra Jane Epstein Lyndhurst, N. J. 

Betty Jane Fisher Allentown 

Betty Frank Great Neck, N. Y. 

Roberta Moser Gaetz Mt. Carmel 

Martha Evelyn Garard Lewisburg 

Naomi Elaine Garman Richfield 

Harriet Irene Garner Hazleton 

Ann Elizabeth Gibson Lewistown 

Harriet Anna Gould Johnstown 

Caroline Mae Graybill McAlisterville 

Elro Elene Hacker Benton 

Carolyn Hope Harbeson Milroy 

Jessie Audrey Havice Lewistown 

Ellen Ruth Hellman New York, N. Y. 

Carl Lindberg Herman Winfield 

Margaret Helen Johns Honesdale 

Barbara Anne Kain Harrisburg 

Edith Kemp Sunbury 

Rhoda S. Klemons Forest Hills, N. Y. 



LIST OF STUDENTS 123 

Phyllis Virginia Kniss Shamokin Dam 

Bernardine Marie Koons Mt. Carmel 

Leila Louise Kramer Birdsboro 

Jeannette Elizabeth Kramer Sunbury 

Ruth Elaine Laks Kingston 

Frances Marie Leisenring Bear Gap 

Betty Mae Liederman New York, N. Y. 

Harriet Julia MacNamara Sunbury 

Edward Douglas Madden, Jr. New York, N. Y. 

Ann Ross Malkames Hazleton 

Hilda Mabel Markey York 

Caroline Estelle Marks Danville 

Marjorie Elizabeth Mengel Freeburg 

Margaret Minier Millersburg 

Lucille Mittleman Washington, D. C. 

Jerry Donald Moore Sunbury 

Paula Moskowitz Passaic, N. J. 

Ongkar Narayan Georgetown, British Guiana 

Raymond DeFour Mould Bronxville, N. Y. 

Richard Hugh Neidich Hewlett, N. Y. 

Charlotte Ruth Oglensky Freehold, N. J. 

Helen Hope Peters Reedsville 

Nedia Polanchyck Frackville 

Roberta Vida Racionzer Valley Stream, N. Y. 

Betty Deloris Ramer York 

Gloria Irene Reichley Dover 

Elizabeth Katz Reisch Ashland 

Joan Cooper Reyner Ventnor, N. J. 

Renee Riemer Freehold, N. J. 

Gertrude Agnes Roberts New Monmouth, N. J. 

Martha Dorothy Sharwarko Hazleton 

Anna Maria Sheetz Mt. Carmel 

Velma Grace Shook Pen Argyl 

George Kenneth Small Paterson, N. J. 

Betty Louise Smith Woodsboro, Maryland 

Joan Ceil Smith Woodmere, N. Y. 

Sara Lee Smith Scranton 

Pauline Betty Solomon Cedarhurst, N. Y. 

Roy Edward Stahl Pittston 

Eleanor Elizabeth Steele Penbrook 

Ellen Clare Stein South Orange, N. J. 

Marie Eleanor Stout Neptune, N. J. 

Florence Elizabeth Strouse Proctor 

Rita Toni Sweedler Larchmont, N. Y. 

Adele June Taub Passaic, N. J. 

Edith Mae Thomas Windber 

Sara Ruth Ulrich Selinsgrove 

Gaynelle Wagoner Pylesville, Maryland 

Gloria Jane Walmer Harrisburg 

Dexter Neil Weikel Espy 

Harry William Welliver Beaver Meadows 

Jean Elizabeth Wentzel Berwick 

Lillian Rose Werner Wilmington, Del. 

Donald Fischer Wohlsen Yonkers, N. Y. 



124 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Jeanne Marie Wortley Drexel Hill 

Helen Virginia Zahn York 

Mary Jane Zane Sterling 

Special Students 

Calvin Conrad Sunbury 

Marion Fern Hackman Oberlin 



Summer Session - 1944 

Unless other wise noted, these students attended both terms of the 
Summer Session. 

Frosta Mary Arseniu Lewistown 

Olive Ruth Atherton Hunlock Creek 

Ronald Herbert Boyer Pillow 

Walter Ellsworth Boyer* Leek Kill 

Russell Franklin Brown Roaring Spring 

Catherine J. Byrod Steelton 

Gayle Virginia Clark Upper Darby 

Helen Ann Eby Newport 

Feme Disque Eriksen '. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Phyllis Jane Free Mifflintown 

Corinne Frances Frey Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Miriam Louise Garth Williamsport 

Mary Elizabeth Gohl Williamsport 

Andrey Jessie Havice Lewistown 

William Anstead Hays* Johnstown 

Betty Jayne Herr Hazleton 

Margaret Helen Johns Honesdale 

Roswell James Johns Honesdale 

Edith Augusta Kemp Sunbury 

Jean L. Kinzer Newport 

John Joseph Kocsis South River, N. J. 

Selena Helen Lehman Sunbury 

Celo Vincent Leitzel Richfield 

Harriet Julia MacNamara Sunbury 

Edward D. Madden, Jr.* New York, N. Y. 

Rubye Nita Meyers* Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Anna Catherine Miller* Sunbury 

Richard Hugh Neidich Hawlett, N. Y. 

Howard Reese Payne* Taylor 

Aldo Pescarmona New York, N. Y. 

Eva Pauline Reichley* Sunbury 

Ada Jayne Romig* Beaver Springs 

Louise Helen Schlick* Kingston 

Patricia Eleanor Snyder Sunbury 

Sarah Scott Steffey* Northumberland 

Bernard Stanley Swiencki Glen Lyon 

Elise Claire Thompson* Lynbrook, N. Y. 

Virginia Margaret Tropea Sunbury 

Martha Jayne Troutman* Elizabethville 

Park L. Wagenbach* Sunbury 

•Attended first term only. 
♦•Attended second term only. 



LIST OF STUDENTS 125 

John Daniel Warner* Schuylkill Haven 

Ira Allen Wasserberg Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Jule Anne Weller Ashland 

Betty Mae Wentzel* Sunbury 

Miriam Willard Coatesville 

Almon Franklin Wolfe Pottstown 

Robert Mutch Workman* Freeburg 



GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF COLLEGE STUDENTS 
ENROLLED IN THE REGULAR SESSION 

1943-44 

New Jersey 14 

New York 9 

Pennsylvania 113 



136 



1944-45 

British Guiana 1 

Delaware 1 

District of Columbia 1 

Maryland 2 

New Jersey 22 

New York 26 

Pennsylvania 130 



183 



SUMMARY 

1943-44 
College of Liberal Arts 

M 

Senior 10 

Junior 4 

Sophomore 8 

Freshman 5 

Unclassified 4 



w 


Total 


12 


22 


7 


11 


20 


28 


34 


39 


3 


7 



31 76 107 



126 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Conservatory of Music 

Senior — 8 8 

Junior 13 4 

Sophomore — 10 10 

Freshman — 6 6 

Unclassified 9 24 33 

10 51 61 

Summer 19J.3 

First Term 16 12 28 

Second Term 17 15 32 

60 228 
Names Repeated 16 12 28 28 

Total 200 



SUMMARY 
1944-45 

College of Liberal Arts 

M 

Seniors 5 

Juniors 5 

Sophomores 5 

Freshmen 12 

25 117 146 

Conservatory of Music 

Seniors 3 4 7 

Juniors 9 9 

Sophomores 5 5 

Freshmen 2 14 16 

Unclassified 19 37 56 

24 69 93 

Summer 19 UU 

First Term 16 30 46 

Second Term 11 21 32 

78 317 
Names Repeated 24 35 59 59 

Total 258 



w 


Total 


9 


14 


10 


15 


29 


34 


71 


83 



PAGE 

Academic Regulations 50 

Accelerated Academic Year 54 

Administrative Officers and Staff 12 

Admission 50 

Admission Under the War Emergency 50 

Advisers, vocational 36 

Alumni Association 111 

Appointment Bureau 36 

Art 59 

Athletics 22 

Attendance Regulations 54 

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements 55 

Bachelor of Science Degree Requirements 56, 57 

Bachelor of Science in Music Education 58, 100 

Bible and Religion 59 

Bills, payment of i 32 

Biology 61 

Boarding Facilities 28 

Board of Directors 10 

Book Store 29 

Buildings and Equipment 19 

Business Administration 63 

Calendar 4 

Chemistry 66 

Classification of Students 53 

College Calendar 7 

Commercial Education 68 

Committees of the Faculty 17 

Committee of the Board of Directors 10 

Conservatory of Music 95 

College Credits 97 

Entrance Credits for Music 95 

Music Education 95 

Pianoforte 108 

Pipe Organ 109 

Rules and Regulations 96 

Singing 109 

Violin 110 



128 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

PAGE 

Conservatory Student Organization 95 

Courses of Instruction 59 

Credit Statements 53 

Day Students, Expenses 31 

Dean's Honor List 54 

Degrees Conferred in 1943 113 

Degrees Conferred in 1944 119 

Description of Courses, Music 102 

Discipline 24, 29 

Economics 71 

Education 73 

English 74 

Enrollment Statistics 123 

Entrance Requirements 51 

Exclusion from the University 29 

Expenses . 31, 98 

Faculty 13 

Faculty of Conservatory of Music 15 

Fees, special 32 

Fraternities 24 

French 77 

General Science 79 

German 79 

Graduation Fee 32 

Graduation Requirements 53 

Greek 80 

Guidance, educational and vocational 35 

Health Service 27 

Historical 9 

History and Political Science 82 

Honors at Graduation 53 

Housing Facilities 28 

Instrumental Courses 101 

Ladies' Auxiliary 112 

Latin 83 

Library 20 

Location 9 

Major and Minor Requirements 52 

Marking System 51 

Mathematics 85 

Music 87 95 

Music and Art, opportunities in 28 

Music Degrees Requirements 99 

Music Expenses 98 

Opportunities in Music and Art 28 






INDEX 129 

PAGE 

National Honor Societies 23 

Personal Attention 33 

Philosophy 87 

Physical Education 88 

Courses for Men 88 

Courses for Women 89 

Physics 90 

Practice Teaching, Music 97 

Preparation for a Career 37 

Accounting 37 

Bacteriology 37 

Business Administration 38 

Chemistry 39 

High School Teaching 40 

Law 42 

Library Science 42 

Medical Secretarial 43 

Ministry 44 

Music 45 

Physical Therapy Technician 45 

Pre-Dentistry 46 

Pre-Medicine 46 

Pre-Nursing 47 

Pre- Veterinary 48 

Psychology 48 

Secretarial 49 

Social Work , 49 

Prizes 25 

Psychology 91 

Purpose and Objectives 18 

Recitals 96 

Refunds 32 

Recognition by Accrediting Agencies 18 

Registration 51 

Religious Life 21 

Reports of Grades 54 

Residence Requirements 54 

Resident Students, Expenses 31 

Requirements for Degrees 55 

Scholarships 25 

Scholastic Regulations 52 

Social Life 21 

Sociology 92 

Sororities 24 

Spanish 93 

Special Events 30 

Special Interest Clubs 23 

Speech 94 



>' 

130 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

PAGE 

Student Government 22 

Student Employment 29 

Student Interest 21 

Student Organizations and Activities 21 

Student Publications 22 

Symphonic Society 95 

Table of Contents 5 

Transcripts and Graduation 32 

University Bands 95 

University Chorus 96 

University Orchestra 96 

Working Positions and Scholarship Grants 29 



SUSQUEHANNA 
UNIVERSITY 



BULLETIN 



SELINSGROVE 

PENNSYLVANIA 




CATALOGUE ISSUE 1945-46 
ANNOUNCEMENTS 1946-1947 




SEIBERT HALL 



SUSQUEHAi 

Bulletin 



NO. 4 



OCTOBER-DECEMBER 



SERIES XLII 



Catalogue Number 




ACADEMIC RECORD 1945-46 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 1946-47 



Published quarterly by Susquehanna University, Selinsgrove, Pennsyl- 
vania, and entered as second-class matter at Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania, 
January 1, 1923, under Act of Congress of August 24, 1912. 



CONTEXTS 



PAGE 

1. Susquehanna and The Returning Veteran 5 

2. College Calendar 7 

3. Historical 9 

4. Board of Directors 10 

5. Administrative Officers and Staff 12 

6. The Faculty 13 

7. Faculty Committees 17 

8. Purpose and Objectives 18 

9. Buildings and Equipment 19 

10. Student Interest 21 

11. Discipline 24 

12. Prizes and Scholarships 25 

13. Health Service 27 

14. Housing and Boarding Facilities 28 

15. Working Positions and Scholarship Grants 29 

16. Special Events 31 

17. Expenses 32 

18. Personal Attention for the Individual Student 34 

19. Educational and Vocational Guidance 36 

20. Preparation for a Career 38 

21. Academic Regulations 51 

22. Course Requirements for Degrees 56 

23. Courses of Instruction 60 

Art 60 Greek 81 

Bible and Religion 60 History and Political Science _ 83 

Biology 62 Latin 84 

Business Administration __ 64 Mathematics 86 

Chemistry 66 Music 88 

Commercial Education 68 Philosophy 88 

Economics 71 Physical Education 89 

Education 73 Physics 91 

English 75 Psychology 92 

French 78 Sociology 93 

General Science 79 Spanish 94 

German 80 Speech 95 

24. The Conservatory of Music 96 

25. Description of Music Courses 103 

26. Susquehanna University Alumni Association 112 

27. Ladies' Auxiliary 113 

28. Degrees Conferred and List of Students 114 

29. Index 123 



CALENDAR 1946 


JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


5 M 

6 7 
13 14 
20 21 
27 28 


T W T 
12 3 
8 9 10 
15 16 17 
22 23 24 
29 30 31 


F 

4 

11 

18 

25 


S 
5 

12 

19 
26 


S 

3 

10 
17 
24 


M T W T F 
1 
4 5 6 7 8 
11 12 13 14 15 
18 19 20 21 22 
25 26 2.7 28 


S 
2 
9 

16 
23 


S M T W T 

3 4 5 6 7 
10 11 12 13 14 
17 18 19 20 21 
24 25 26 27 28 
31 


F S 
1 2 
8 9 
15 16 
22 23 
29 30 


APRIL 


MAY 


JUNE 


1 

7 8 
14 15 
21 22 
28 29 


2 3 4 
9 10 11 
16 17 18 
23 24 25 
30 


5 

12 
19 
26 


6 
13 

20 

27 


5 

12 
19 
26 


12 3 

6 7 8 9 10 
13 14 15 16 17 
20 21 22 23 24 
27 28 29 30 31 


4 
11 

18 
25 


2 3 4 5 6 
9 10 11 12 13 
16 17 18 19 20 
23 24 25 26 27 
30 


1 
7 8 
14 15 
21 22 
28 29 


JULY 


AUGUST 


SEPTEMBER 


1 

7 8 
14 15 
21 22 
28 29 


2 3 4 
9 10 11 

16 17 18 
23 24 25 
30 31 • 


5 

12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 

27, 
\ 


! 4 
11 
|18 

,25 


1 2 
5 6 7 8 9 

12 13 14 15 16 
19 20 21 22 23 
26 27 28 29 30 


3 

10 
17 

24 
31 


12 3 4 5 
8 9 10 11 12 
15 16 17 18 19 
22 23 24 25 26 
29 30 


6 7 
13 14 
20 21 
27 28 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


6 7 
13 14 
20 21 

27 28 


12 3 
8 9 10 
15 16 17 
22 23 24 
29 30 31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 

12 
19 
26 


3 

10 
17 
24 


1 
4 5 6 7 8 
11 12 13 14 15 
18 19 20 21 22 


2 
9 
16 

23 


12 3 4 5 

8 9 .10 11 12 


6 7 
13 14 


15 16 17 18 19 
22 23 24 25 26 
29 30 31 


20 21 
27 28 


25 26 27 28 29 


3U 


CALENDAR 1947 


JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


S M 

5 6 
12 13 
19 20 
26 27 


T W T 
1 2 


F 
3 


S 
4 


S 

2 
9 

16 
23 


M T W T F 

3 4 5 6 7 
10 11 12 13 14 
17 18 19 20 21 
24 25 26 27 28 


S 
1 
8 
15 
22 


S M T W T 

2 3 4 5 6 
9 10(1} 12 13 
16 17 18 19 20 
23 24 25 26 27 
30 31 


F S 
1 

7 8 
14 15 
21 22 
28 29 


7 8 9 10 11 
14 1& IS 17 18" 
21 22 23 <2i 25 
28 29 30 31 


APRIL 


MAY 


JUNE 


6 7 
13 14 
20 21 
27 28 


1 2 3 
>'8T 9 10 

15 16 17 
22 23 24 
29 30 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


4 
11 
18 
25 


1 2 

5 6 7 8 9 
12 13 14 15 16 
19 #d 21 22 23 
426 27 28 29 30 


3 

10 

17 

24 

31 


12 3 4 5 
8 9 10 11 12 
15 16 17 18 19 
22 23 24 25 26 
29 30 


6 7 
13 14 
20 21 
27 28 








SUSQUEHANNA AND THE 
RETURNING VETERAN 



Since Mat, 1944, Susquehanna has resumed the status of a civilian 
college. For fourteen months previous to that date, it was one of 
the selected colleges offering the Army Air Forces College Training 
Program as part of the huge development of the Army Air Corps. 
With the termination of this program in all of the cooperating col- 
leges, Susquehanna returned to civilian status. 

Accordingly, under the educational provisions of the G. I. Bill, 
the College is prepared to take care of (1) its former students who 
were called out of college into service and who wish to complete their 
interrupted college courses, (2) aviation students of the Army Air 
Forces who took their college training course at Susquehanna, (3) 
high school graduates who were prevented from entering college 
because of the war and (4) high school graduates who had not origi- 
nally intended to go to college but who will now be able to do so 
under the G. I. Bill. 

For these returning veterans, Susquehanna is prepared to offer 
the following special services : 

1. Counselling in the necessary procedures to qualify for the financial 
grants of the G. I. Bill. 

2. Guidance in the selection of the proper vocations and college 
courses. 

3. Vocational Testing to determine if the veteran's choice is in 
accordance with his ability and experience. 

4. Assistance and Advice in getting college credit through the Armed 
Forces Institute for the academic training, correspondence study, 
and educational experience which the veteran got in the armed 
services. 

5. An Accelerated College Program, including a summer term of 
twelve weeks, and class schedules as heavy as he can successfully 
carry, to enable the returning veteran to speed up his education and 
reduce the usual four-year course to three years or less. 

5 



6 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

6. Provisions for Starting College Work at Numerous Times During 
the Year. Returning veterans should enter classes if possible on 
one of the four regular entrance dates during the year, namely, in 
mid-September, late January, mid-June or late July. 

However, in case these dates are inconvenient or impossible, 
special arrangements will be made to start veterans on refresher 
courses or regular college studies on an auditing or tutoring basis at 
convenient dates during the regular semesters. 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 



SECOND SEMESTER 1945-46 

January 26 and 28, Saturday and 

Monday Mid- Year Vacation 

January 29, Tuesday, 8:00 a.m. Registration for Second 

Semester 
January 30, Wednesday, 8:00 a.m. __ College Exercises Open on 

Regular Schedule 

March 1, Friday Academic Recognition Day 

April 17, Wednesday, noon Easter Recess Begins 

April 22, Monday, 1:00 p.m. College Exercises Resume 

May 11, Saturday Sub-Freshman Day 

May 25, Saturday Alumni Day 

May 26, Sunday Baccalaureate Service 

May 27, Monday Commencement Day 

SUMMER TERMS 1946 

June 18, Tuesday Registration Day 

June 19, Wednesday, 8:00 a.m. First Term Begins 

July 4, Thursday Independence Day, Holiday 

July 27, Saturday First Term Ends 

July 29, Monday Registration for Second Term 

July 30, Tuesday, 8:00 a.m. Classes Begin*/ 

September 2, Monday Labor Day, Holiday 

September 7, Saturday Second Term Ends 

FIRST SEMESTER 1946-47 

September 14, Saturday -\- Freshmen Arrive for Orienta- 
tion Program 

September 17, Tuesday ...Freshman Registration 

September 18, Wednesday Registration of Other Classes 

September 19, Thursday, 9 :00 a. m. - Matriculation Day Exercises 

7 



8 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

September 19, Thursday, 10 :10 a. m. _ College Exercises Open on 

Regular Schedule 
September 19, Thursday, 8 :00 p. m. _. Faculty Reception to Students 

{Founders' Day 
Parents' Day and 
Homecoming, Holiday 

November 28, Thursday Thanksgiving Day, Holiday 

December 18, Wednesday, noon Christmas Recess Begins 

January 3, Friday, 8:00 a.m. College Exercises Resume 

January 24, Friday Semester Ends 

SECOND SEMESTER 1946-47 

January 25 and 27, Saturday and 

Monday Mid- Year Vacation 

January 28, Tuesday, 8:00 a.m. Registration for Second 

Semester 
January 29, Wednesday, 8 :00 a. in. _. College Exercises Open on 

Regular Schedule 

March 3, Monday Academic Recognition Day 

April 2, Wednesday, noon Easter Recess Begins 

April 8, Tuesday, 1:00 p.m. College Exercises Resume 

May 10, Saturday Sub-Freshman Day 

May 24, Saturday Alumni Day 

May 25, Sunday Baccalaureate Service 

May 26, Monday Commencement Day 





PINE LAWN 



THE LIBRARY 
CONSERVATORY OF 
MUSIC 



AERIAL VIEW OF SUSQUEHANNA CAMPUS 

MENS ATHLETIC FIELDS HASSINGER HALL 

SELINSGROVE HALL GUSTAVUS ADOLPHUS HALL 

SEIBERT HALL 



MEN'S TENNIS COURTS 
HEATING PLANT 
ALUMNI GYMNASIUM 

WOMEN'S ATHLETIC FIELD 
STEELE SCIENCE HALL 



HISTORICAL 



Susquehanna University had its beginning as Missionary Institute, 
the corner-stone of which was laid on September 1, 1858. The 
founder was the Reverend Dr. Benjamin Kurtz, an eminent divine 
of the Lutheran Church of his day. The school was established to 
supply the need for more ministers. From this original motive it 
has broadened its scope to include the preparation of young men and 
,r oung women for all honorable vocations in life, never ceasing to 
tmphasize the necessity of the Christian ethic in all true education. 
In 1895, its corporate name was changed to Susquehanna Uni- 
versity. Born in faith, organized and promoted through prayer, it 
has grown steadily to its present strength. 

The following men have served as presidents : 

1858-1865 Benjamin Kurtz, D.D., LL.D. 

1865-1881 Henry Zeigler, D.D. 

1881-1893 Peter Born, D.D. 

1893-1895 Franklin P. Manhart, D.D., LL.D. 

1895-1899 J. R. Dimm, D.D., LL.D. 

1899-1901 C. W. Heisler, D.D. 

1901-1902 John I. Woodruff, Litt.D., LL.D., Acting 

President 

1902-1904 G. W. Enders, D.D. 

1904-1905 J. B. Focht, D.D. 

1905-1927 Charles T. Aikens, D.D. 

1928- G. Morris Smith, A.M., D.D., LL.D. 

LOCATION 

Susquehanna University is located at Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania, 

a town of three thousand inhabitants, five miles south of Sunbury 

and forty-five miles north of Harrisburg. The campus of sixty-two 

acres adjoins the borough limits. Selinsgrove is easily reached by 

bus connection from Sunbury, which is a main stop on the Williams- 

r>ort division of the Pennsylvania Railroad. The Reading trains 

from Philadelphia and New York also stop at Sunbury, while 

Northumberland, seven miles from the campus, is the terminus of 

he Lackawanna Railroad from Scranton and the north. Those 

jming by motor may use Route 11, the Susquehanna Trail, or Route 

522 from Lewistown and the west. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 

William M. Reaeick, A.M., D.D. President 

Rev. John F. Harkins, A.M., D.D. First Vice-President 

Claude G. Aikens, B.S. Second Vice-President 

Frank A. Eyer Secretary-Treasurer 

Hon. Charles Steele, A.M. Endowment Treasurer 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
G. Morris Smith, President 

Frank A. Eyer Dan Smith, Jr. 

Dan R. Erdman Hon. Charles Steele 

J. P. Carpenter, Esq. J. D. Bogar, Jr. 

Samuel J. Johnston W. M. Rearick 

MEMBERS 

Term Expires 1950 

Claude G. Aikens, B.S. State College, Pa. 

Frank A. Eyer Selinsgrove, Pa. 

G. Morris Smith, A.M., D.D., LL.D. Selinsgrove, Pa. 

John Peters Williamsport, Pa. 

John A. Apple Sunbury, Pa. 

Dan R. Erdman Sunbury, Pa. 

Term Expires 1949 

M. P. Moller, Jr., B.S. Hagerstown, Md. 

William M. Rearick, A.M., D.D. Mifflinburg, Pa. 

L. S. Landes, M.D., 454 W. Market St. York, Pa. 

George B. Wolf, 38 W. Fourth St. Williamsport, Pa. 

Hon. Charles Steele, A.M. ^Northumberland, Pa. 

10 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 11 

Term Expires 1948 

Rev. Ross H. Stover, D.D., LL.D., 6409 N. Sixth St. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

J. Frank Thompson, E. Market and Kershaw Sts. York, Pa. 

Rev. H. Clay Bergstresser Hazleton, Pa. 

Gr. D. Krumrine State College, Pa. 

P. M. Headings Lewistown, Pa. 

W. Alfred Streamer 6903 Chew St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Term Expires 19J+7 

J. P. Carpenter, Esq., A.B., A.M. Sunbury, Pa. 

Rev. H. W. Miller, D.D., 1010 Elmira St Williamsport, Pa. 

Rev. John F. Harkins, A.M., D.D. State College, Pa. 

Dan Smith, Jr., 225 E. Third St. Williamsport, Pa. 

Marion S. Schoch, B.S., M.Lit. Selinsgrove, Pa. 

J. D. Bogar, Jr. Harrisburg, Pa. 

Term Expires 1946 

Samuel J. Johnston Bloomsburg, Pa. 

I. A. Shaffer, Jr. Lock Haven, Pa. 

Rev. L. Stoy Spangler Newport, Pa. 

Charles A. Nicely "Watsontown, Pa. 

Rev. G. B. Harman Duncansville, Pa. 

F. E. Ehrenfeld, B.S. Philipsburg, Pa. 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 
AND STAFF 

1945-46 

G. Morris Smith, A.M., D.D., LL.D. President 

Russell Galt, Ph.D. Dean 

Miriam L. Unangst, A.B. Dean of Women 

Isabel Nicely Secretary of Admissions 

Hilda G. Kolpin, B.S., B.S. in Lib. Sci. Librarian 

Ernest T. Yorty Business Manager 

E. Beatrice Herman, A.B. Bursar 

Edwin Monroe Brungart, A.M. Superintendent of Buildings 

and Grounds 

Mrs. Anna Miller Humphrey Dietitian 

Bertha M. Hein, R.INL Assistant to the Dean of Women 

Athalia T. Kline, A. M. Faculty Resident in the Cottage 

Amelia L. Brosius, R. N. Preceptress in Hassinger Hall 

Elizabeth V. Smith, A.B. Secretary to the President 

/ Ruth E. McCorkill, B.S. Business Secretary 



12 



THE FACULTY 



1945-1946 

G. Morris Smith President 

A.B., Roanoke College 1911; A.M., Princeton University 1912; 
Diploma, Lutheran Theological Seminary, Philadelphia 1919; D.D., 
Roanoke College 1928; Graduate study, Columbia University; 
LL.D., Bucknell 1940. 

Russell Galt Dean of the College 

A.B., Muskingum College 1919; A.M. 1920 and Ph.D. 1936, Colum- 
bia University; School of Oriental Studies, Cairo, Egypt, 1920-22. 

John Irwin Woodruff Professor Emeritus of Philosophy 

Diploma, Missionary Institute 1888; A.B. 1890 and A.M. 1893, 
Bucknell University; Litt.D., Wittenberg College 1903; LL.D., 
Waynesburg College 1921. 



/G 



J 



* 



eorge Elmer Fisher Professor of Chemistry 

Diploma, Missionary Institute 1888; Ph.B.. Bucknell University 
1891; Ph.D., Illinois Wesleyan University 1905. 

Theodore William Kretschmann Professor Emeritus of Bible 

and Religion 
A.B., 1888, A.M. and B.D., 1891, University of Pennsylvania; 
Diploma Lutheran Theological Seminary, Philadelphia 1891; Ph.D., 
University of Pennsylvania 1892. 

George Franklin Dunkelberger Professor of Education 

and Psychology 

A.B., Susquehanna University 1908; A.M., University of Pitts- 
burgh 1919; Pd.D., Susquehanna University 1921; Ph.D., New 
York University 1927; Graduate study, Columbia University. 

Augustus William Ahl Professor of Greek 

Diploma, Gymnasium and Seminary, Breklum, Germany, 1908; 
A.M., Susquehanna University 1912; Ph.D., Vanderbilt Univer- 
sity 1920; Graduate study, Peabody College for Teachers, Nash- 
ville, Tenn. 

thur Herman Wilson Professor of English 

A.B. 1927, A.M. 1929, and Ph.D. 1931, University of Pennsylvania. 

William Adam Russ, Jr. Professor of History and Political Science 
A.B., Ohio Wesleyan 1924; A.M., University of Cincinnati 1926; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago 1933. 

13 




P 



r 



\/14 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 



* 




Russell Wieder Gilbert Professor of German 

A.B., Muhlenberg College 1927; A.M. 1929 and Ph.D. 1943, Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania. 

Amos Alonzo Stagg, Jr. Professor of Physical Education 

Ph.B., 1923 and A.M., 1935, University of Chicago; A.M., Columbia 
University 1941; Graduate study, University of Chicago. 

Fisk William Stocking Scudder Professor of Biology 

A.B., Ohio Wesleyan University 1923; Ohio Wesleyan University 
1924-25; Ph.D., Cornell University 1938. 

JV John Jacob Houtz Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Mathematics 
A.B., Susquehanna University 1908; M.S., Louisiana State Univer- 
sity 1912; ScD., Carthage College 1933. 

Daniel Irvin Reitz Assistant Professor of Commercial Education 

Ph.B., Muhlenberg College 1926; A.M., University of Pennsylvania 
1930. 

A George Merritt Robison Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

and Physics 
A.B. 1916, M. A. 1917, and Ph.D. 1919, Cornell University. 

Grover C. T. Graham Assistant Professor of Economics and 

Business Administration 
A.B., William Jewell College 1909; A.M., Brown University 1910; 
Graduate study, Brown University. 

Kenneth B. Waterbury Assistant Professor of 

Education and Psychology 
B.S. 1930, M.Ed. 1933, and Ed.D. 1939, Pennsylvania State College. 

«*. Lenora Allison Instructor in Commercial Education 

A.B., Bowling Green College of Commerce 1930; M. Ed., University 
\ of Pittsburgh 1937. 



A>* 



Athalia Tabitha Kline Instructor in French and Spanish 

A.B., Randolph Macon Woman's College 1922; A.M., Duke Uni- 
versity 1925. j 

'Lucy Clayton (trtL*vft.vi/^*# > ^ tJ k Instructor in Physical Education 
B.S., Hanover College 1944; Graduate Study, Penna. State College. 

[ilda G. Kolpin Lecturer in Library Science 

B.S., New York State Teachers College 1927; B.S. in Lib. Sci., 
Syracuse University 1929; Graduate Study, University of Wiscon- 
sin, University of Illinois. 



1/ 



/ 



THE FACULTY 15 

Bertha Mabel Hein Lecturer in Medical Secretarial Subjects 

Diploma, Allentown Hospital Training School for Nurses 1908; 
R.N., Pennsylvania State Board for Registration of Nurses 1909; 
Diploma, Baltimore Lutheran Deaconess Training School 1924. 



J 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

E. Edwin Sheldon Director of Conservatory of Music, 

Professor of Pianoforte, Music Form, Canon-Fugue 

Graduate, New England Conservatory of Music 1900; Graduate, 

New York University 1921; Mus.M., Susquehanna University 1908; 

Mus.D., Susquehanna University 1939. 

Percy Mathias Linebaugh 

Professor of Pipe Organ, Pianoforte, Counterpoint 

Mus.B., Lebanon Valley College 1917; Graduate study, New York 
University, Peabody Conservatory of Music. 

Condran Hatz Assistant Professor of Violin, Harmony, 

Band, Orchestra 
B.S. in Music Education, Lebanon Valley College 1937; Graduate 
study, Temple University, Juilliard Institute; A.M., Columbia 
University 1942. 

Ida Maneval Sheldon Instructor in History of Music 

Mus.B., Susquehanna University 1907; Graduate study, New York 
University. 




* MARY Ki 



Ary Kathryn Pottetger Instructor in Pianoforte, Sight Singing 

Mus.B., Susquehanna University 1925; Graduate study, New York 
University. 

NAAlice Holmen GiauQUE Instructor in Public School Music Methods, 

Music Appreciation, Chorus, Singing 
B.S. in Music Education 1937 and A.M. 1940, Columbia University. 



16. 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 



/> 



J 



lbert Dixon Haskins Instructor in Singing, Choral Conducting 

A.B., University of Michigan 1923; A.M., New York University 
1939; Graduate study with Bianca Randall, Paris, France, with 

/Paul Althouse, New York City, and at Feagin School of Dramatic 
Art, New York City. 

Nancy Bowman Hatz Instructor in Harmony, Band Instruments 

B.S. in Music Education, Lebanon Valley College 1936; A.M., 
Columbia University 1941. 







FACULTY COMMITTEES 

/ 



1945-1946 



Star 



Admission and Student Standing 
Galt, Gilbert, Rssfre, Nicely, Russ, S erflUBBR , Sheldon, Wilsoi 



Catalogue and Curriculum 

a Galt, JNicely 



Library 
F - i « hbr , Kolpin, Russ, Wilson 

Physical Education and Athletics 
Galt, Moyer,* G. M. Smith, Stagg, "Wit:..;-^,* Yorty 

Public Events 
Allison, Gilbert, Linebaugh, Russ, Sheldon 

Publications 
Fishkic, R**¥«, "Wilson, Yortv 

Religious Life 
Ahl, Fis ' hbb, , P yawooT - 

Social Affairs 
Br©8hjs, Galt, Gilbert, Hatz, Hein, Reitz, Unangst 

Teacher Education 
Galt, Rbitz, Russ, Sheldon, Waterbury, "Wilson 

Veterans' Education 
llt, Graham, Robison, Scudper, Sheldon, "Waterbury, "Wilson 



*Alumni representative. 

17 



PURPOSE AND OBJECTIVES 



The purpose of Susquehanna University is to provide for 
its students adequate educational facilities, and competent 
Christian scholars as teachers who shall create an environ- 
ment and an atmosphere conducive to the production of 
Christian character. The curricular objectives are the of- 
fering of liberal arts courses that shall issue in a deep, broad- 
based, well-rounded culture, and of opportunity for technical 
and vocational education in the fields of business, commerce, 
and music. Susquehanna University desires to see in its 
students true scholarship interpenetrated with a genuine 
Christian faith. 



RECOGNITION BY ACCREDITING AGENCIES 

Susquehanna University is recognized officially as a 
four-year liberal arts college by the following accredit- 
ing agencies: 

1. The Middle States Association of Colleges 
and Secondary Schools. 

2. The Pennsylvania State Department of 
Public Instruction and similar accrediting 
agencies of neighboring states. 

Susquehanna University is also a member of the As- 
sociation of American Colleges and the American 
Council of Education. 



18 



BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 



In its campus development and the addition of new buildings, Sus- 
quehanna University is following a carefully wrought-out plan. On 
the campus of more than sixty-two acres, there are at present sixteen 
brick buildings : 

Selinsgrove Hall was the first building on the campus. It was built 
in 1858 very largely through the generosity of the people of Selinsgrove 
and vicinity. During the days of Missionary Institute, from 1858 to 
1895, it was the only building on the campus, and contained a dormitory 
for men, classrooms, literary society halls, and a chapel. Selinsgrove 
Hall is a substantial three-story brick building. Today, the first floor 
accommodates the administrative offices, and the second and third floors 
serve as a dormitory for the men students. 

Seibert Memorial Hall is a commodious three-story brick building 
in the colonial style of architecture. It was erected in 1901-1902. On 
the first floor are located the reception hall, the social parlors, the chapel, 
and dining room. The second and third floors serve as the dormitory for 
the women students. In the basement are found the dispensary, the day 
students' room, the sorority rooms, and a large social room. The building 
was named in honor of Samuel Seibert, of Hagerstown, Maryland, by the 
provisions of whose will the University received $20,000. This munifi- 
cent gift from the Seibert Estate was made possible very largely through 
the efforts of Dr. S. W. Owen, of Hagerstown, Maiwland, the President 
of the Board of Trustees at the time. The Moller three-manual pipe 
organ in the chapel was presented to the University by William A. 
Hassinger in memory of his wife, Mrs. Almeda M. Hassinger. 

Hassinger Memorial Hall is a modern brick fireproof dormitory for 
men. Dedicated June 13, 1921, it was erected substantially through the 
gifts of the family of Martin Luther Hassinger, a former director of the 
college. It has four floors, with a number of rooms arranged as suites. 
It is modern in its appointments. Hassinger Hall has been completely 
renovated and is being used as a residence for women. 

Gustavus Adolphus Hall is a large building of red brick, containing 
lecture rooms, and the offices, classrooms, and laboratories of the Depart- 
ment of Business. This is the oldest building now used for classroom 
purposes, having been completed and dedicated on February 15, 1895. 
It was originally built to house the theological seminary, not now in 
existence, and contained at one time the college administrative offices, 
student rooms, and chapel. In 1928 it was remodeled to accommodate 
the Department of Business, and the administrative offices were moved 
to the first floor of Selinsgrove Hall. 

Steele Science Hall was completed and dedicated on June 10, 1913. 
It was built largely through the gifts of the Hon. Charles Steele, other 
directors of the Board, and friends of the college. It contains the chem- 

19 



20 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

istry, physics, biology, and psychology laboratories, and a large amphi- 
theatre for laboratory demonstrations. This room contains a motion 
picture screen and projectors for both still and motion pictures. 

The Alumni Gymnasium. The present modern gymnasium was dedi- 
cated on June 3, 1935, and replaced an older building which had been 
destroyed by fire. The money for its construction was raised under the 
leadership of President G. Morris Smith through trustee, faculty, and 
alumni subscriptions, as well as from friends of the college. For full 
description of this building, see page 28. 

The Library, striking in its simplicity, was dedicated on June 8, 1928. 
It is the first unit of a larger library which is planned for the future. 

The Conservatory of Music. A three-story building, originally the 
home of Dr. Jonathan R. Dimm, a former president of the institution, 
was made over for conservatory use in 1921. Additions to it were built 
in 1925-26. It contains classrooms and individual practice rooms. 
Through the efforts of Mr. M. P. Moller, St., who was a member of the 
Board of Directors for twenty years, a Moller two-manual pipe organ 
was installed in the conservatory. 

The Cottage, located on the campus, serves as a girls' dormitory 
annex to Seibert Memorial Hall. 

Pine Lawn is the president's house. 

Four Duplex Faculty Residences. 

Central Heating Plant. 

Laundry. 

THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 

To supplement the instruction in the various courses, the univer- 
sity library, housed in a colonial, fire-proof building, erected in 1928, 
functions as a reference library of more than 24,316 volumes and 
nearly 3,000 volumes of bound magazines, to which additions are 
made constantly. The library is classified and arranged according 
to the Dewey decimal system, and contains both supplementary 
material and an adequate collection of the standard reference tools. 

The library is open from 7:50 a. m. to 12 noon. 1 to 5 r». m.. and 
7 to 10 p. m., Mondav through Friday; Saturday from 7:50 a. m. to 
12 noon, and from 1 to 3 p. m. 

Books, except reference and those on the reserve shelves, may 
circulate for two-week periods. Reference books and magazines may 
not be taken from the library. Reserve books mnv be tnken out from 
10 p. m. to 8 a. m. and at other periods when the birlding is closed. 

The library receives rogulnrly about 150 periodicals, both for 
scholastic and recreational reading, three daily newspapers, Bnrrnn's 
Financial Weekly, two local weekly newspapers, the standard index 
services, and many other college publications. The library contains 
also the "Wilt Music collection, a bequest of several thousand books 
of value to music students. It contains also about six hundred 
volumes of biographv and about eleven hundred volumes nf fiction. 

Freshmen are given ten hours of instruction in the bnsic tools 
of the library and the technique of using them through independent 
research. 



^rfi* 




** 



™ 





LIBRARY 



STUDENT INTEREST 



RELIGIOUS LIFE 

Education without religion is incomplete. Susquehanna stands for 
the steady and consistent cultivation of the religious life. Each 
student is required to take the credit courses in religion as provided 
in the curriculum, and to avail himself of the opportunities offered 
for spiritual development. He is expected to attend chapel and 
church regularly. Any student who persistently refuses to accom- 
modate himself to these opportunities for spiritual development may 
be asked to withdraw from the college. 

Open to all students, the Student Christian Association carries 
on a voluntary religious program throughout the year. By the 
example of their own lives, members seek to lead others to the full 
expression of their personalities and, through friendship, to acquaint 
new students with the ideals of college life. 

Mid-week devotional services and Sunday vespers are conducted 
under the auspices of the Student Christian Association. 

SOCIAL LIFE 

Susquehanna University, being a coeducational institution, seeks 
to supply a normal, natural development amid refined and cultural 
surroundings. The social life is under the control of a faculty com- 
mittee. All social events, with chaperons specifically named, must 
receive the approval of the faculty social committee before being 
carried out. A financial budget for each event must be submitted in 
advance for approval by the social committee before any contracts 
may be made. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND ACTIVITIES 

Student organizations may be formed by having their constitu- 
tions and by-laws approved in advance by the administration and 
faculty. All changes in the existing constitution and by-laws must 
also be approved. All college organizations (except those maintain- 
ing dormitories or dining halls) which collect dues or assessments or 
raise money otherwise for any purpose are required to keep their 
funds on deposit with the office of the bursar, thus securing a com- 
plete and accurate accounting for all funds received and spent. This 

21 



22 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

procedure is not designed to relieve the organization officers of any 
responsibility. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

Student government operates on the campus of Susquehanna 
University through six organizations : the Men's Student Council, 
the Women's Cooperative Council, the Women's Athletic Association, 
the Intersorority Council, the Fraternity Senate, and the Proctors' 
Committee for the men's dormitory. 

In all of these organizations efforts are made to initiate student 
representatives into the problems of democratic group control. There 
is vested in these organizations as much direction of campus affairs 
as students are normally able to carry successfully. These organiza- 
tions provide a practice ground for cooperation between the student 
body and the administration, which must carry the final legal respon- 
sibility for the policies of the institution. 

The form of student government followed in most of these organ- 
izations is that of a relatively large number of student representa- 
tives working with one faculty adviser. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

The Student Handbook serves as a guide and reference book 
to incoming students and especially to freshmen. It is published 
mainly through the Student Christian Association. 

The Susquehanna is the weekly, undergraduate newspaper and 
offers any student with the desire to see himself (herself) in print a 
good chance to take part in the various phases of journalism: head- 
line writing, newspaper make-up, straight news, features, sports, 
general reporting, and editing. Academic credit is optional. 

The Lanthorn is issued annually by members of the junior 
class. It contains a record of college life portrayed by pictures, 
prose, and poetry. 

ATHLETICS 

Amateur standards are maintained in football, field hockey, 
basket ball, track, baseball, and tennis. In each of these activities, 
teams are maintained and a healthy spirit prevails. Team members 
and representatives command respect on every field for manliness, 
good sportsmanship, and athletic performance. Letters are awarded 
to members of varsity teams under rules of the athletic committee, 
and suitable letters or insignia of recognition are awarded to suc- 
cessful teams or competitors in minor and intra-mural sports and 
activities. The Varsity "S" Club is an organization of men who 
have won the "S" in athletics. 

The Women's Athletic Association has as its purpose the pro- 






STUDENT INTEREST 23 

motion of women's athletics, sports, and activities. It stimulates 
interest in physical efficiency and maintenance of ideals and good 
sportsmanship. 

NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETIES 

Tau Kappa Alpha is a national honorary forensic fraternity, 
founded for the purpose of giving recognition to those who have 
attained high honors in the field of public speaking and debating. 
The Susquehanna chapter, chartered in 1930, is one of more than a 
hundred chapters in the United States. 

Pi Gamma Mu is a national social science honor society consist- 
ing of 130 chapters with a membership of over 19,000, established to 
encourage and reward undergraduate interest in the social studies. 
The Pennsylvania Gamma Chapter was established in 1927 and has 
a membership of 185, including members of the faculty, alumni, and 
undergraduates. Members are selected on the following basis : 
evidence of special interest in social studies, at least twenty semester 
hours in the social studies, a "B" average in all social studies, a high 
scholastic standing, and good character. 

Sigma Alpha Iota Fraternity is a national music fraternity 
for women. The Susquehanna chapter, chartered in 1903, is one of 
the sixty-four chapters in the United States. Its purpose is to pro- 
mote high standards of professional scholarship, ethics, and culture, 
and to bring about a closer relationship among those pursuing some 
phase of music as a profession. 

Alpha Psi Omega is a national dramatic fraternity consisting 
of 198 chapters, organized for the purpose of providing an honor 
society for those doing a high standard of work in dramatics and 
incidentally, through the expansion of Alpha Psi Omega among the 
colleges of the United States and Canada, providing a wider fellow- 
ship for those in the college theatre. The Susquehanna chapter, 
Theta Phi, was chartered in 1941. 

SPECIAL INTEREST CLUBS 

Students with similar interests meet in organizations — usually 
once a month — and at such times programs, concerts, tours, or 
special occasions are arranged and approved. 

The Biemic Society is maintained to further the interests of 
students in biology, chemistry, and physics, and presents programs 
prepared by members or by visitors, qualified on scientific subjects. 

Phi Kappa is an organization of students who are interested in 
the cultivation of a proper appreciation of the Greek language and 
culture. At their meetings, papers prepared by the members are 
presented, and a social hour usually follows. 



24 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

The Pre-Theological Club is an organization of students who 
are preparing to enter the study of the Christian ministry. Its aim 
is to foster the spiritual life on the campus. Faculty members and 
ministers are frequently invited to speak to the group. 

r The Business Society provides a means to discuss matters of 

common interest for students of finance, management, accounting, 
marketing, economics, teaching of commercial subjects, and related 
fields. 

The musical organizations are the University Chorus. Sym- 
phonic Society, and the Bands. Each of these organizations holds 
regular practice periods and rehearsals, and sponsors or gives public 
performances. Each group is encouraged and supported by the 
Conservatory of Music. 

SOCIAL FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES 

There are three social fraternities for men: Bond and Key, 
Theta Chi (Beta Omega chapter), and Phi Mu Delta (Mu Alpha 
chapter). Each has a home near the campus. 

There are two social sororities for women : Kappa Delta Phi and 
Omega Delta Sigma. 

These organizations have been granted certain privileges by the 
Board of Directors. Freshmen are discouraged from becoming 
-pledged to a fraternity or sorority during the first semester rushing 
season if their mid-semester grades are below average. 

Freshmen pledges will be permitted to become active members of 
a fraternity or sorority in May of the freshman year provided their 
scholastic standing is satisfactory. 

A student who has completed one full year's work in another 
college and is of sophomore standing may join a fraternity or sorori- 
ty at the close of the first semester at Susquehanna University, pro- 
vided the student's conduct has been satisfactory and class standing 
has been maintained. 

DISCIPLINE 

It is assumed that all students have come to college voluntarily 
for serious study and that they will cheerfully adjust themselves to 
its ideals and regulations. The college reserves the ri^ht to require 
the withdrawal of students whose scholarship is unsatisfactory, and 
of those who for any other reason are regarded as not in accord with 
the ideals and standards which the college seeks to maintain. 

A student suspended for misdemeanors loses all credit for work 
done during the semester. In any case of reinstatement, the student 
will be on probation for one semosi. »r. 

Intoxicating liquors shall not be allowed in students' rooms or 



STUDENT INTEREST 25 

fraternity houses. The detection of liquors in any student's room, 
on his person or on his breath, will be held sufficient evidence to 
warrant his suspension from college. 

Drinking of intoxicating liquors, gambling, cheating, or similar 
breaches of discipline may be punished by suspension or dismissal 
from college. 

PRIZES 

1. The Stine Mathematical Prize — Through an endowment made 
by the Rev. H. M. Stine, Ph.D., D.D., of Harrisburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, there is annually provided a prize of fifteen dollars to be 
awarded to a member of the sophomore class who has the highest 
average in the study of mathematics during the freshman and 
sophomore years. The conditions under which the prizes will 
be conferred shall be subject to the regulations of the faculty. 

2. Sigma Alpha Iota National Fraternity Prize — A certificate 
is awarded by the Sigma Alpha Iota Fraternity to its senior girl 
having the highest average for four years in the music course. 

3. Omega Delta Sigma Sorority Prize — A cash prize is awarded 
by the Omega Delta Sigma Sorority to its senior girl having the 
highest academic average for her college career. 

4. Kappa Delta Phi Sorority Prize — A cash prize is awarded 
by the Kappa Delta Phi Sorority to its senior girl having the 
highest academic average for her college career. 

5. The Charles E. Covert Memorial Prize — By a bequest of 
$500.00 from the Alberta S. Covert estate, the Charles E. Covert 
memorial prize has been established to be awarded to a member 
of the junior class deemed to have exercised the most wholesome 
influence during his first three years. Elements of character, 
scholarship, attitude, and leadership will receive major consid- 

/ eration in awarding this prize. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

1. The One-Half Scholarship, endowed by Mr. DeWitt Bodine, 
of Hughesville, Pennsylvania, in the amount of $500. The 
annual interest of this sum as a scholarship is under the direc- 
tion of the Council of the Lutheran Church at Hughesville, 
Pennsylvania. 

2. The Brownmiller Scholarship, of $1,000, established by Rever- 
end E. S. Brownmiller, D.D., and his son, Reverend M. Luther 
Brownmiller, A.B., of Reading, Pennsylvania. The annual 
interest of this sum is under the direction of the donors. 



26 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

3. The Bateman One-Half Scholarship, of $500, established by 
Reverend S. E. Bateinan, M.D., ScD., of Atlantic City, New 
Jersey, for the benefit of the Susquehanna Synod. 

4. The Huyett Scholarship, established by Mr. E. M. Huyett, 
of Centre Hall, Pennsylvania, of $1000, to be given under the 
direction of the president of the university. 

5. The Bodine Scholarship, of $1000, established by Mrs. Emma 
B. Bodine, of Hughesville, Pennsylvania, widow of Mr. DeWitt 
Bodine, in memory of her husband, who was a director of the 
university. 

6. The Duck Scholarship, in the amount of $1000, established by 
Mr. Henry Duck, of Millheim, Pennsylvania, in memory of his 
wife. 

7. The Keiser Scholarship, in the amount of $1000, established 
by Mr. John A. Keiser, of West Milton, Pennsylvania, in mem- 
ory of his wife. 

8. The Wieand Scholarship, in the amount of $1000, established 
by Reverend W. R. Wieand, D.D., of Altoona, Pennsylvania, in 
grateful remembrance of what Missionary Institute, now Sus- 
quehanna University, did for him in earlier years. 

9. The Mary L. Steele Scholarship, in the amount of $5000, 
established by the Honorable Charles Steele, of Northumberland. 
Pennsylvania. The income is to be used for the education of 
worthy students at Susquehanna University subject to nomina- 
tion by the donor's family. 

10. The Lena Brockmeyer Scholarship, in the amount of $1000, 
established by check received from Reverend G. L. Rankin, then 
treasurer of Pittsburgh Synod, Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania. 

11. The M. P. Moller Scholarship, in the amount of $5000, estab- 
lished by Mr. M. P. Moller, of Hagerstown, Maryland. 

12. Class Gift Scholarship — Class gifts from the graduating 
classes of 1914, 1930, 1931, and 1932 have made possible the 
establishment of a fund, the income from which makes available 
a scholarship annually for a person who has attained a high 
scholastic rank. 

13. Women's Auxiliary Scholarship, in the amount of $1000, es- 
tablished by the Women's Auxiliary of Susquehanna University. 

14. The William II. Miller Scholarship, established by William 
H. Miller, of Stoystown, Pennsylvania, in the amount of $900. 
The annual interest on this sum is a scholarship under the direc- 
tion of the administration of the University for the education of 
worthy young men preparing for the gospel ministry. 



STUDENT INTEREST 27 

15. The Misses Amanda and Elizabeth Smith Scholarship, en- 
dowed in the amount of $1000, the income to be available for 
worthy students for the ministry. 

16. The Lillian V. Johanson Smith Scholarship, established in 
1943 by her sister, Miss A. E. Johanson, her brother, Dr. A. M. 
Johanson, and her husband, Dr. G. Morris Smith. The amount 
of the endowment is $1350, the interest from which is to be 
awarded from year to year to that needy student who, in the 
judgment of the scholarship committee, shows the marks of 
scholarly achievement coupled with dedication to the Christian 
spirit. 

17. The Abraham H. Heilman Scholarship, in the sum of $1000, 
established in 1945 by his son, William C. Heilman, Cambridge, 
Massachusetts. 

18. The Adeline Elizabeth Landes Scholarship, in the sum of 
$1000, established in 1945 by her son, Dr. Latimer S. Landes, 
York, Pennsylvania. 

19. The Sallie Burns Lenker Scholarship, in the sum of $5000, 
established in 1945 by Mrs. Sallie Burns Lenker, Dalmatia, Penn- 
sylvania, for students of the Lower Mahanoy Consolidated School, 
Dalmatia, Pennsylvania. It is understood that recipients of this 
scholarship shall, upon achieving earning capacity, make in 
gratitude an appropriate contribution to the Sallie Burns Lenker 
Scholarship Fund. 

20. The Della Gramly Ocker Scholarship, in the sum of $1628.45, 
established by the will of Mrs. Della G. Ocker, Harrisburg, Penn- 
sylvania, for worthy students of the ministry. 

% I- P 1 ^ HEALTH SERVICE 

The success of a student in college and in later life depends 
largely upon physical fitness and reserve energy, both of which are 
fundamental to an active mind and capacity for hard and efficient 
work. The student is constantly reminded of the importance of good 
health and is urged to develop habits that lead to wise use of leisure 
time, both while in college and after graduation. 

Health activities, physical education, and intercollegiate and 
intra-mural sports are integrated into a health program which is 
required of all students. The health service embraces the following 
activities : physical examination of all students ; health supervision 
and inspection of dormitories, dining halls, kitchen, wash rooms, 
dressing rooms, and showers; cooperation with the student's family 
physician; development of a scientific attitude toward the building 
of good health, including diet, physical exercises, control of the 
emotions, and mental hygiene. The student is taught to build a 
social and recreational program to develop qualities of cooperation, 
fair play, perseverance, self-control, and sportsmanship. The col- 



28 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

lege operates a dispensary under the supervision of a registered 
nurse, who is resident in Seibert Hall. Her services are available to 
all students in case of illness and for treatment of minor injuries. 
When the services of a physician are needed they may be obtained 
at a minimum cost. The health program is carried on largely in 
connection with the athletic fields, recreational facilities, and the 
gymnasium. 

The university field is made up of two gridirons, a soccer field, a 
baseball field, a nine-hole golf course, four tennis courts for men, and 
an excellent quarter-mile track with a 220-yard straightaway. On 
the opposite side of the gymnasium is the women's athletic field, 
including the hockey field, a soccer field, an archery range, and five 
tennis courts. Parts of the fields are flooded during the winter 
months to provide for skating and ice hockey. 

The alumni gymnasium is 110 feet long and 65 feet wide. The 
first floor contains locker rooms, shower rooms, play rooms, and 
separate equipment facilities for men and women. The second floor, 
comprising the gymnasium proper, is large enough to permit two 
games of basketball to be played simultaneously. There are facilities 
for indoor baseball, volleyball, tennis, handball, badminton, and gym- 
nastic activities. At the north end of the building are separate 
offices for the directors of athletics. 

Numerous social functions and exhibitions are held in the gym- 
nasium, which has a seating capacity of more than six hundred. 

OPPORTUNITIES IN MUSIC AND ART 
Opportunities for hearing interpretations of the great masters 
are made available to the student body, faculty, and friends. In- 
creased opportunities will be offered at a nominal cost as the demand 
warrants. 

Students in the conservatory of music give recitals prepared under 
the supervision of the members of the conservatory faculty. Students 
who are not sufficiently advanced to participate in the evening 
recitals are given experience in public performances in a recital class. 

HOUSING AND BOARDING FACILITIES 

All resident freshmen and sophomores are required to room in the 
college residences and board in the college dining hall. 

Any resident junior, senior or special student desiring to room in a 
fraternity house must first have written permission of the business 
manager. No students shall room or board at hotels, restaurants, or 
public boarding houses. Rooms are rented for the full college year 
and no change is permitted except through a written request to 
and approval of the business manager. 

No deductions will be made from the charges for board unless the 
student applying for the same has been unavoidably absent for a 




STUDENT INTEREST / 29 

period of at least two weeks. The college reserves fhe right to close 
all residences as well as the dining room at stated times, especially 
during vacation periods. 

Rooms in the residences are furnished with beds, springs, mat- 
tresses, wardrobes, chairs and tables. Each student must come sup- 
plied with sheets, blankets, pillows, pillow cases, rugs, towels, pic- 
tures, and articles of decoration. It is suggested that each student 
bring a good electric study lamp. The choosing of room decorations 
such as curtains, especially where the student is rooming in a double 
or suite of rooms, should not be made until the roommate is consulted. 

Any student wilfully destroying or defacing college property will 
be required to pay the cost of replacement or repair and will be 
subject also to a fine or dismissal from the institution. 

It is assumed that all students contracting for room and board 
in the college residences accept the responsibility of abiding by the 
rules and regulations. 

The college does not carry insurance on personal property of 
faculty members or students and is not responsible for any loss of 
property. 

Special electric appliances such as heaters, irons, high-powered 
lamps, etc., are not permitted except by arrangement with the bursar 
to cover cost of current consumed. An extra charge of $2.50 per 
semester is made for a radio in a student's room. 

Information concerning vacant rooms will be sent on application. 
It is recommended that in making application for a room, at least 
two selections be given in the order of preference. Application for 
a room must be accompanied by a deposit of ten dollars. Unless the 
reservation is cancelled before August first, the fee is forfeited or 
applied on the bill for the first semester. 

Room assignments are made to returning students in April. The 
rooms are rented for the entire year, but the college reserves the 
right to change any room assignment if it deems it advisable. The 
college also reserves the right to inspect the rooms when it sees fit to 
do so. 



WORKING POSITION'S AND SCHOLARSHIP GRANTS 

Opportunities for working positions on the campus are open alike 
to men and women students. The number of positions open each 
year is variable. Opportunity for student employment is contingent 
upon the quality of the academic record maintained. Any student 
deserving such an opportunity should make application to the busi- 
ness manager before May 1. 

Scholarship grants are awarded on the basis of mental ability, 
academic achievement, general deportment, and financial need. They 
will not be renewed when the holder falls below an academic average 
of C for the school year. These grants will be reduced or withdrawn 



30 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

for unsatisfactory deportment or for an unsatisfactory academic 
record. 

BOOK STORE 

Text books and school supplies may be purchased at the Book 
Store. Students must pay directly to the store for all articles when 
purchased. Student mail is distributed from lock boxes at this store. 
The store is located at the south end of the first floor of Selinsgrove 
Hall. 

EXCLUSION FROM THE UNIVERSITY 

The Administration reserves the right to exclude at any time 
students whose conduct or academic standing it regards as undesir- 
able, and without assigning any further reason therefor; in such 
cases the fees due or which may have been paid in advance to the 
institution will not be remitted or refunded, in whole or in part, and 
neither the institution nor any of its officers shall be under any 
liability whatsoever for such exclusion. 



SPECIAL EVENTS 



, 



To broaden and enrich the life at Susquehanna, special speakers, 
artists, and groups appear from time to time. Since the last catalogue 
was published, the following have been heard : 



1944 
November 9 

November 16 

December 5 



Maxine Stellman, soprano, Metropolitan Opera Asso- 
ciation 

Dr. Eppling Reinartz, promotional secretary, United 
Lutheran Church in America 

Stringfellow Barr, president of St. John's College 



1945 

February 12 Hart House String Quartet 

February 20 Dr. C. Franklin Koch, executive secretary of the Board 
of Social Missions, United Lutheran Church in 
America 

February 26 Helene Harter, former missionary to Japan 

March 5 Fitzroy Davis, actor, director, author 

March 22, 23 Ruth Juram, secretary of promotion, Women's Mission- 
ary Society of the United Lutheran Church in 
America 

April 27 The Infantry Concert Group, all soldier orchestra 

May 21 D. K. Ernst, hypnotist 

May 25 Dr. Paul J. Hoh, president, Lutheran Theological Sem- 

inary, Philadelphia, baccalaureate address 

May 26 Dr. R. H. Rivenburg, dean and vice president of Buck- 

nell University, commencement address 

September 20 The Reverend W. Lynn Crowding, superintendent 
Sunbury Diocese of the Methodist Church, convoca- 
tion address 

October 23 Dr. Gould Wickey, executive secretary, Board of Edu- 
cation, United Lutheran Church 
Helene Harter, former missionary to Japan 
Dr. Robert Gearhart, pastor for Lutheran students, 
University of Pennsylvania 
October 30 Norman Cordon, bass-baritone, Metropolitan Opera As- 
sociation 
November 15 Louis Fischer, lecturer, journalist 



31 



EXPENSES 



KESIDENT STUDENTS 

The tuition charge to resident students is $10.00 per semester hour. 
The total costs for the year, including tuition, board, room rent, and 
all other expenses except special fees, are approximately as follows, 
depending upon choice of room : 

Men PER YEAR 

Tuition ($10 per semester hour) 

Liberal Arts (32 hrs. for the year) $320.00 

Activities Fee 20.00 

Board 225.00 

Books (estimated) 15.00 

Damage Deposit 5.00 

Average Room Rent for Men 80.00 

Rates of Rooms: Hassinger Hall $90.00 

Selinsgrove Hall 70.00 

Approximate cost for year $665.00 



Women 

Tuition ($10 per semester hour) 

Liberal Arts (32 hrs. for the year) $320.00 

Activities Fee 20.00 

Board 225.00 

Books (estimated) 15.00 

Damage Deposit 5.00 

Average Room Rent for Women 105.00 

Rates of Rooms: Seibert Hall 

(Double Suite— Bath) ___ $100.00 
(Double— Without Bath) _ 90.00 

(Single— Bath) 120.00 

(Single— Without Bath) _ 100.00 

Approximate cost for year $690.00 

The tuition general expenses for the Music Education Course is 
$375.00 a year. For further details see page 99. 

DAY STUDENTS 

The tuition charge to day students is $10.00 per semester hour. 
Special fees are extra. 

32 



THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 99 

EXPENSES 

For the best results in piano, singing, organ, violin, etc., in which 
individual instruction is given, students should take two periods of 
instruction each week. This is in accordance with the general prac- 
tice of conservatories of music. The university year is divided into 
two semesters of equal length. 

The total charge to boarding students for the year, including tuition, 
board, room rent, and all other fees ranges from $810.00 to $830.00 for 
men, and $810.00 to $850.00 for women. 

The total annual charge to day students, registered for the degree 
ranges from $450.00 up depending on the schedule taken. 

Two hours of daily practice on a piano are included in the above 
rates. Organ practice is an additional expense. Its cost is listed under 
miscellaneous expenses. 

The following tuition rates per semester are quoted for students not 
registered for a degree course: 

PIANO, SINGING, PIPE ORGAN, VIOLIN, etc. 

Freshman and Sophomore Years 

One semester — 2 one-half hour lessons per week $60.00 

One semester — 1 one-half hour lesson per week 30.00 

Junior and Senior Years 

One semester — 2 one-half hour lessons per week $80.00 

One semester — 1 one-half hour lesson per week 40.00 

Sub-Freshman Year 
PIANO, VIOLIN, CLARINET, TRUMPET, TROMBONE, etc. 

One semester — 2 one-half hour lessons per week $32.00 

One semester — 1 one-half hour lesson per week 16.00 

MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES 

Rent of three-manual organ — one semester, 5 hours per week $25.00 

Rent of three-manual organ — one semester, 2 hours per week 10.00 

Rent of two-manual organ — one semester, 5 hours per week 20.00 

Rent of two-manual organ — one semester, 3 hours per week 12.00 

Rent of piano — one semester, 1 hour each day 5.00 

Rent of piano — each additional hour, one semester 2.00 

Private lessons in all theoretical subjects, each 1.00 

Sight Playing library fee — one semester 1.00 

Rent of any orchestral instrument, one semester 5.00 

Music theory subjects not taken for credit toward a degree shall be 
charged at the rate of $12.00 per semester hour. 






AV 






i 



RESIDENT STUDENTS 



The tuition charge to resident students is $12.00 per semester hour. 
The total costs for the year, including tuition, board, room rent, and all 
other expenses except special fees, are approximately as follows, depend- 
ing upon choice of room: 

Men PER YEAR 

Tuition ($12 per semester hour) 

Liberal Arts (32 hrs. for the year) $384.00 

Activities Fee 20.00 

Board 270.00 

Books (estimated) 25.00 

Damage Deposit 5.00 

Average Room Rent for Men 90.00 

Approximate cost for year $794.00 

Women 

Tuition ($12 per semester hour) 

Liberal Arts (32 hrs. for the year) $384.00 

Activities Fee 20.00 

Board 270.00 

Books (estimated) 25.00 

Damage Deposit 5.00 

Average Room Rent for Women 105.00 

Approximate cost for year $809.00 

The tuition general expenses for the Music Education Course is 
$450.00 a year. For further details see page 99. 

DAY STUDENTS 

The tuition charge to day students is $12.00 per semester hour. 
Special fees are extra. 

N. B. — The above rates become effective September 14, 1946, and 
supersede any rates published prior to that date. 

32 



EXPENSES 



SPECIAL FEES 



A damage deposit of $5 is required of all students. Damage to 
property will be charged against this fee. The remainder will be 
returned to the student at the end of the school year. Wherever pos- 
sible damage will be charged directly to the person responsible for 
causing it. 

Alumni Association life membership, senior year, 

second semester $5.00 

Botany, zoology, comparative anatomy, bacteriology 

embryology and histology 4.00 per semester 

Change of registration 1.00 per semester 

Chemistry, all courses 6.00 per semester 

Commercial education 15, 16, 25, 26, 32 5.00 per semester 

Experimental physics ! 6.00 per semester 

General Psychology 2.50 per semester 

Health and dispensary service 2.50 per semester 

Surveying 3.00 per semester 

Graduation fee, senior year, second semester 8.00 

Observation and practice teaching, senior year 2.50 per credit 

Transcript of record (after first copy) 1.00 

The special fees for each semester must be paid in advance or at the 
time of registration. 

PAYMENT OF BILLS 

To facilitate matriculation it is requested that a check covering 
all fees due at the beginning of the session be sent to the Bursar in 
advance of the arrival of the student. Checks should be made pay- 
able to Susquehanna University. No student is registered until his 
bill has been settled in the Bursar's office. 

TRANSCRIPTS AND GRADUATION 

Satisfactory settlement of all bills and fees is required before 
semester grades or an honorable dismissal can be granted and trans- 
cript of grades released. No student will be graduated until all final 
obligations to the college, class publications, organizations and clubs 
are settled. This includes class assessments voted by a majority of 
a class in a regularly called meeting. 

REFUNDS 

No fee will be refunded unless serious illness or other cause 
entirely beyond the control of the student compels withdrawal from 
the college. Students dismissed for unsatisfactory work or for in- 
fringement of college rules are allowed no refunds. There will be 
no refunds for courses dropped two weeks after registration day. 



? 



PERSONAL ATTENTION FOR THE 
INDIVIDUAL STUDENT 



Susquehanna has always maintained a faculty large enough to give 
personal attention to each individual student. For many years, 
there has been the generous ratio of one professor for every ten 
students. It has, therefore, been possible to provide close personal 
attention and counselling. 

The transition from high school to college is a difficult one. Col- 
lege work is heavier and more exacting. It requires more time for 
study than the average high school senior has previously found 
necessary. In addition, college freshmen are living away from home, 
and the problems of adjusting their lives to new surroundings and 
new people are difficult and perplexing. So great are the difficulties 
of this transition stage that the number of students who fail because 
of them during the first two years of college is exceedingly high. 
For many students, the warm, friendly, personal atmosphere of the 
Susquehanna campus has meant success in solving these problems, 
whereas the cold, impersonal atmosphere of many huge institutions 
would have meant failure. 

Susquehanna's policy is to provide personal attention for those 
xoho need it. Students who are capable of directing their own col- 
lege studies and affairs successfully are not required to have faculty 
members counsel and guide them. Students learn by doing, and for 
those who do well nothing is so retarding as unnecessary supervision. 

This does not mean that students are left to do as they please. 
Personal supervision for all naturally results from an adequate 
faculty, small classes, and a self-contained campus located on the 
outskirts of a college town of 3,000 persons. But in addition to this 
naturally favorable situation, the following specific program is the 
heart of Susquehanna's personalized education for those who need it : 

(1) All freshmen are given placement tests on entering the college, 
the results of which, together with their high school records, guide the 
Administration in its immediate handling of the students. 

If their records show that they have done good work and are poten- 
tially capable of continuing to do good work, they are allowed to carry 
on their college programs with a minimum of guidance. This is supplied 
by those professors in the subject-matter fields of their choice, who 
assist them in making out their semester schedules of studies. They are 
also under the close supervision of their classroom instructors, the dean 
of women, and the dean of the college. 

34 



PERSONAL ATTENTION 35 

If their records show that they are not strong students, they are 
assigned to a faculty adviser, who talks over their records with them, 
discusses study habits, and helps make out study schedules. In addition, 
they are sent to the Proctored Study Period, conducted by faculty mem- 
bers every evening except Saturday and Sunday. Here weak students 
find a place and a regular time most favorable for efficient study. Thus, 
by prompt action, students are prevented from getting off to a bad start. 

(2) If, at any marking period, students fail to make the minimum 
passing standard, they are assigned to a faculty adviser (if they do not 
already have one) and are sent to the Proctored Study Period. 

(3) In addition to the above, the dean of women and the dean of 
the college give special attention to failing students by holding personal 
interviews with them and keeping their parents informed of the progress 
of each case. 

(4) At the end of each semester the complete records of failing 
students are reviewed by a faculty committee representing the main fields 
of study. At this review, reports from the faculty advisers are read 
and the strength and weakness of the students are evaluated. For those 
students who have possibilities of improvement, the committee prescribes 
programs of studies, regulates their extra-curricular activities, notifies 
the parents of the difficulties, and calls the attention of professors to 
these cases. 

By such specific actions does Susquehanna make failure in college a 
difficult thing and by such practical procedure does it make individualized 
education a reality. 



EDUCATIONAL AND VOCATIONAL 
GUIDANCE 



During the Orientation Program each new student is given a series 
of college aptitude aud placement tests. An opportunity is given each 
student to confer with a member of the teaching staff to outline the 
work of the freshman year. 

The Dean maintains a central personnel file in which all the 
students' records from various sources are collected. These are used 
to aid the student in coming to an intelligent adjustment to college 
life. 

Not later than the end of the sophomore year each candidate for 
the B.A. degree is required to select some field in which he expects 
to concentrate his work. This is expressed in a major and a sup- 
porting minor. "When the selection of a major has been made, the 
professor at the head of that department becomes the student's 
adviser and replaces the general adviser of the freshman and sopho- 
more years. The major adviser in consultation with the student 
completes an outline of the student's program of study for the 
remainder of his college course. These major advisers work in con- 
junction with the professional advisers who are acquainted with the 
specific requirements of a particular profession. 

Vocational planning is furthered by : 

1. Encouraging the student to secure accurate information about the 

vocation in which he is interested and by building up a body of 
qualifications to be successful in the occupation. 

2. Giving of vocational interest tests to students who believe they 

possess special interests or abilities, or to those who are 
undecided. 

3. Maintaining a series of references in the library on a special shelf 

where students may get acquainted with the literature about the 
different professions. 

4. Informing students who plan to enter the professions or pursue 

further study, on such matters as schools, admissions, costs, 
scholarships, and courses. The following professional advisers 
have been designated for this purpose: 

36 



EDUCATIONAL AND VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE 37 

Profession or Occupation Advisers 

Accounting Graham/ 

Business Graham 

Chemistry or Chemical Engineering Fishbr, Houtz 

Commercial Education Reit£ 

Dentistry Scudder 

Diplomatic or Government Service Russ 

Teaching Galt I 

Journalism Wilson 

Law Russ 

Library Service Kolpin 

Medical Professions and Nursing Scudder, Hein 

Ministry and Religious Education President Smith 

Music Sheldon ■ 

Psychology Waterbury ' 

Pharmacy and Manufacturing Chemistry __ Fisher- 

Physics ROBISON 

Radio and Aviation Rob-ison 

Secretarial Allison 

Veterans' Education Galt 



THE APPOINTMENT BUKEAU 

The College maintains an Appointment Bureau for the benefit of 
graduating seniors and alumni. This service is given free of charge. 
Positions are not definitely guaranteed, but a large percentage of 
students have been placed through Appointment Bureau contacts. 
In the past it has been primarily a placement agency for those 
entering the teaching profession, but recently, definite work has been 
done to widen the Bureau's scope, and to secure contacts Avith private 
firms, large corporations, and State and Federal Civil Service. 

Typical positions which it has been called upon to fill include 
radio research, aircraft engineering, research chemistry, high school 
principalships, Y. W. C. A. secretaryships, psychiatric nursing, credit 
investigation, medical secretaryships, and high school teaching in 
liberal arts, commercial, and music fields. 



PREPARATION FOR A CAREER 



A college education is intended to enrich the student's cultural 
life and to prepare him to earn his living in a worthy profession. 
In many professions a rich cultural foundation, or general education, 
is the basis for later professional specialization. Susquehanna's 
curricula offer a wide variety of vocational choices. 

The following outlines of courses leading to vocations are sug- 
gestive. While some subjects are of necessity required for a par- 
ticular profession, the Administration permits as much flexibility 
as possible after basic requirements are met. 

ACCOUNTING 

A complete course in this field is offered at Susquehanna. Those 
who are interested in becoming certified public accountants in Penn- 
sylvania must be graduates of a recognized college, and have three 
years of satisfactory experience, two of which must be in the office of 
a certified public accountant. This course is also registered by the 
New York State Board of Regents for training in this field. An 
outline of the curriculum is found under Business Administration. 

BACTERIOLOGY (Laboratory Technician) 

A new profession for women has opened up in the general field 
of bacteriology, in which specialized training leads to the career of 
laboratory technician in doctors' laboratories, hospitals and public 
health service. A laboratory technician is trained to perform the 
various chemical, microscopic and bacteriological tests used in the 
diagnosis and treatment of disease. The course consists of two 
parts: (1) a minimum of two years in college, followed by (2) a full 
year of practical work in an accredited hospital. The length of the 
college work varies, some hospitals demanding a full four-year col- 
lege course before permitting the student to enter for the year of 
practical work. Susquehanna has successfully prepared students 
for both the minimum and maximum requirements, and the course 
as outlined meets the pre-professional requirements of the Registry 
of Medical Technologists. The suggested four-year course of study 
is as follows : 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

History of Western Europe 3 3 

38 



PREPARATION FOR A CAREER 39 

First I Second 
Freshman Year (Continued) Semester Semester 

-^Foreign Language 1 pjc 3 3 

General Chemistry M_ 3 3 

— Colle ge-Algebra .and Trigonometry r ^ n r , __. 3Ai— — '< 3- 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

3 3> 
Sophomore Year 

English Literature - 3 3 

-Foreign Language S-<. - -%i\ 3 3 

Bible LI 2 2 

Zoology 3 3 

American History 3 3 

Qualitative Analysis 3 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

Junior Year 

Comparative Anatomy 3 3 

General Psychology 3 

Applied Psychology 3 

fiistology 3 3 

Organic Chemistry 4 4 

Christian Philosophy 2 

Ethics 2 

Bacteriology 3 

Heredity 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

Senior Year 

Embryology 3 1* 

Physiology 3 

Quantitative Chemistry 3 3 

Introductory Physics 4 4 

Electives 6 5 



BUSINESS ADMINISTKATION 

For many years Susquehanna has been offering specialized train- 
ing for those young men and women who desire to enter business as 
a vocation. There are opportunities for graduates of this course to 
become accountants, salesmen, bankers, advertising men, statisticians, 
real estate and insurance specialists, and business analysts. There 
are opportunities in government service for those with a major in 
economics. The course is well balanced with general education and 
the basic studies of the business world. 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Economic Geography 3 3 

Business Mathematics 3 

Elementary Accounting 3 



• 



LJ 



40 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

First Second 

Freshman Year (Continued) Semester Semester 

Science Survey 3 3 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 

Business English 3 

Bible 2 2 

Intermediate Accounting 3 3 

Economics 3 3 

American History or Sociology 3 3 

Business Law 3 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

Junior and Senior Years 

Additional courses to complete the requirements for graduation 
as outlined on page 57. These include General Psychology (3), 
Ethics (2), Christian Philosophy (2), American Government (3), 
the required number of electives in general education, and the re- 
quired number of hours in Business Administration and Economics 
selected from the following courses in consultation with the head of 
the department: 

History of Industrial Development 3 

Business English 3 

Mathematics of Finance 3 

Business Management 3 

Advanced Business Law 3 

Machine Accounting 3 

Cost Accounting 3 

Advanced Accounting 3 

Auditing 3 

Federal Tax Accounting 3 

Statistical Methods 6 

Marketing 3 

Advertising 3 

Salesmanship 3 

Consumer Economics 3 

Investments 3 

Insurance 3 

Money and Banking 3 

Labor Problems 3 

Transportation 3 

Foreign Trade 3 

Public Finance 3 



CHEMISTRY 

For those students who wish to make chemistry (Other than 
teaching chemistry) their life-work, the following course is sug- 
gested : 



// 



PREPARATION FOR A CAREER 41 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Foreign Language (German recommended) 3 3 

History of Western Europe 3 3 

College Algebra and Trigonometry 3 3 

General Chemistry 3 3 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 3 

Language 3 3 

American History 3 3 

Qualitative Analysis 3 or 4 3 or 4 

Analytic Geometry and Calculus 4 4 

Physical Education 1 1 

Junior Year 

General Psychology 3 

Applied Psychology 3 

Organic Chemistry 4 4 

Introductory Physics 4 4 

Bible 2 2 

Electives 4 4 

Physical Education 1 1 

Senior Year 

Physical Chemistry 4 4 

Quantitative Analysis 4 4 

Physics (advanced elective) 3 3 

Christian Philosophy 2 

Ethics 2 

Elective 3 3 



HIGH SCHOOL TEACHING 

Susquehanna has had an outstanding record in the training of 
successful high school teachers and administrators. Her graduates 
in large numbers are serving as District Superintendents, County 
Superintendents, and Principals. Training is offered in Secondary 
Education, Commercial Education, and Music Education. 

Eighteen hours in the field of education are required for cer- 
tification in Pennsylvania.* These must include Introduction to 
Teaching, 3 hours; Educational Psychology, 3 hours; Practice 
Teaching, 6 hours; and 6 hours of electives in education. Susque- 
hanna requires that one of these electives be a course in the Tech- 
niques of Teaching, 3 hours.** 

In Secondary Education, majors are offered in English, French, 

*For New Jersey and New York requirements see p. 74. 

**A recent announcement of the Department of Public Instruction states that after 
September 1, 1943, all candidates for a permanent college certificate must present a basic 
course in American and Pennsylvania History, and that after September 1, 1944 all 
candidates for a temporary college certificate must fulfill this requirement. 



42 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

German, Latin, history, mathematics, chemistry, physics and biology. 
In addition to the eighteen prescribed hours of education, the State 
requires twenty-four hours in the first teaching field, and eighteen 
hours in each additional field, for certification. However, the State 
gives certification to teach the social studies, (namely, history, civics, 
Problems of Democracy, economics, and sociology) by taking 9 hours 
of history and 3 hours each of political science, economics, and soci- 
ology, totalling eighteen hours. Certification is also given to teach 
Science (namely, physics, chemistry, biology, and general science) 
by taking 9 hours of Physical Science, divided into 6 hours of chemis- 
try and 3 hours of physics (or vice versa), and 9 hours of Biological 
Science, divided into 6 hours of zoology, and 3 hours of botany (or 
vice versa). 

SECONDARY EDUCATION 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 3 

History of Western Europe 3 3 

Bible 2 2 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 3 

American History 3 3 

General Psychology 3 

Educational Psychology 3 

Christian Philosophy 2 

Ethics 2 

Physical Education 1 1 

The first two years for those who plan to specialize in mathe- 
matics or science will differ slightly from the above according to the 
specific major requirements found under course descriptions for each 
major field. 

The last two years in the liberal arts fields will be planned in 
conjunction with the faculty adviser in each field, in accordance with 
degree and major requirements. 

COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 

For the specialized curriculum required by the Pennsylvania 
State Department of Public Instruction for teachers of the commer- 
cial subjects, see page 58. 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

For the specialized curriculum required by the Pennsylvania 

State Department of Public Instruction for teachers of public school 
music, see page 101. 



PREPARATION FOR A CAREER 43 

JOURNALISM 

The most adequate preparation for a career in journalism is a 
four-year liberal arts course with a major in English, and a broad 
cultural program in the social sciences, languages, and psychology. 
This should be followed by at least a year's study in a graduate school 
of journalism, although positions may be had on newspapers or 
magazines directly after leaving college. The outline for the first 
two years of the liberal arts course is found on page 56. Oppor- 
tunities are offered in college for students to obtain experience in this 
field by working on the college newspaper, the Susquehanna. 

LAW 

Entrance to an accredited law school is usually preceded by a 
four-year college course in which emphasis is placed on such funda- 
mental subjects as history, English, foreign languages, psychology, 
science and social sciences. 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 3 

History of Western Europe 3 3 

Bible 2 2 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 3 

Christian Philosophy 2 

Ethics 2 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

Science or Mathematics 3 3 

General Psychology 3 

Educational or Applied Psychology 3 

American History 3 3 

The junior and" senior years should be planned with the faculty 
adviser to pre-legal students in accordance with the requirements of 
the law school for which the student is preparing. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE „ 

A four-year course from an approved college is a prerequisite for 
entrance to schools of library science. Students should choose early 
the school at which they expect to do their graduate work in library 
science and plan their undergraduate work to meet its requirements. 
Such students should also apply for employment in the College 
Library as student assistants. 



44 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 3 

History of Western Europe 3 3 

Bible 2 2 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 3 

Christian Philosophy 2 

Ethics 2 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

Science or Mathematics 3 3 

General Psychology 3 

Educational or Applied Psychology 3 

American History 3 3 

The student preparing for library school should plan to major in 
English and minor in history and political science, with supple- 
mentary courses in economics and sociology. A year of typing is 
included in this course in the junior year. 



MEDICAL SECRETARIAL 

An increasing demand for specially trained persons to act as 
secretaries for physicians, hospitals, and laboratories, has led Susque- 
hanna to incorporate such training into its Business Department. 

Although such work is so highly specialized that a four-year 
college course is most desirable for those planning to enter this pro- 
fession, provision is made for those who feel they can give but two 
years to their training, to complete such work in that time as will 
enable them to obtain positions as medical secretaries. A suggested 
curriculum is as follows: 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Zoology or Chemistry 3 3 

Shorthand and Typing 5 5 

Bible 2 

Elective 3 3 

Medical Terminology 1 

Home Nursing 1 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 



PREPARATION FOR A CAREER 45 

First Second 

Sophomore Year Semester Semester 

General Psychology 3 

Applied Psychology 3 

Medical Shorthand 3 3 

Adv. Shorthand and Typing 5 5 

Medical Ethics 2 

Medical Office Practice and Procedure 2 

Principles of Sociology 3 

Business English 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

Those who take the , four-year course will major in biology or 
chemistry, and study other broad cultural courses. They will receive 
the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

^ 

MINISTRY 

Theological seminaries generally require a four-year college 
course for entrance. The American Association of Theological 
Schools has stated that the college work of pre-theological students 
should result in acquaintance with the world of today, in the ability 
to use certain tools of the educated man, and in a sense of achieve- 
ment. The ministry needs men of broad culture. To this end, the 
student preparing to enter the Seminary should lay emphasis on the 
liberal arts program of his college rather than the elements com- 
monly known as pre-professional. 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 3 

History of Western Europe 3 3 

Bible 2 2 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 3 

American History 3 3 

General Psychology 3 

Applied Psychology 3 

Christian Philosophy 2 

Ethics 2 

Physical Education 1 1 

In the junior and senior years, pre-theological students ordinarily 
choose a major from the classical languages, English, history, soci- 
ology or philosophy. 



46 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

The following are recommended as electives : 

Introduction to Philosophy 3 

History of Philosophy 3 

Modern Philosophers 3 

Principles of Sociology 6 

Principles of Economics 6 

Modern Social Problems 3 

The Family 3 

Abnormal Psychology 6 

Public Speaking 3 

Typing 4 

Techniques of Teaching 3 

American Literature 4 

Shakespeare 4 

American Government 3 



MUSIC 

Susquehanna has for many years emphasized the importance of 
music by maintaining a fully staffed Conservatory of Music. For 
full details of the specialized curriculum offered for the training of 
public school music teachers, see page 101. 



PHYSICAL THERAPY TECHNICIAN 

According to the American Red Cross, there is an increasing 
demand for physio-therapists. They will be needed for many years 
after the war. 

The physical therapy technician treats disorders, such as frac- 
tures, sprains, nervous diseases, and heart trouble according to a 
patient's needs or as prescribed by a physician, rendering treatments 
encompassing all of the physical therapeutic arts; gives exercises to 
patients designed to correct muscle ailments and deficiencies; admin- 
isters massages and performs other body manipulations; administers 
artificial sunray treatments, ultraviolet, or infrared ray treatments, 
therapeutic baths, and other water treatments. 

Red Cross requirements for registration as a physical therapy 
technician include 60 college semester hours, with courses in biology 
and chemistry and a year of physical therapy in a school approved 
by the Council of Medical Education and Hospitals of the American 
Medical Association. 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Zoology 3 3 

Principles of Sociology 3 3 

General Chemistry 3 3 



PREPARATION FOR A CAREER 47 

First Second 

Freshman Year (Continued) Semester Semester 

Bible 2 2 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 3 

Comparative Anatomy 3 3 

Physics or Chemistry 4 4 

General Psychology 3 

Applied Psychology 3 

American History 3 3 

Physical Education 1 1 



PRE-DENTISTRY 

The American Council on Dental Education has prescribed a 
minimum of two full years of college as a requirement for entrance 
to dental schools. The requirement is difficult to accomplish in two 
years and many students take more time. The trend in dentistry, 
as in the other professions, is toward a full four-year college course 
before entering dental school. 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Bible 2 2 

History of Western Europe 3 3 

General Chemistry 3 3 

Zoology 3 3 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 3 

Comparative Anatomy 3 3 

Organic Chemistry 4 4 

Introductory Physics 4 4 

General Psychology 3 

Applied Psychology 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

Students who continue in the pre-dental course will arrange their 

schedules with their faculty adviser. 



PRE-MEDICINE 

Pre-medical students at Susquehanna are given close personal 
supervision by an adequate group of science professors experienced 
in preparing students for the difficult study of medicine. The course 



48 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

listed below is merely suggestive since the requirements for admission 
to medical schools vary. 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

German or French 3 3 

History of Western Europe 3 3 

General Chemistry 3 3 

College Algebra and Trigonometry 3 3 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 3 

German or French 3 3 

Bible 2 2 

General Psychology 3 

Qualitative Chemistry 3 3 

Zoology 3 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

Junior Year 

Christian Philosophy 2 

Ethics 2 

Organic Chemistry 4 4 

Physics 4 4 

Comparative Anatomy 3 3 

Histology or Embryology and Physiology 3 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

Senior Year 

Social Science 3 3 

Quantitative or Physical Chemistry 3 3 

Histology or Embryology and Physiology 3 3 

Electives 6 6 



PRE-NHRSLN"G 

The ordinary hospital will accept high school graduates as candi- 
dates for nurses' training. Those who desire to enter the larger 
hospitals will do well to take at least one year of college work before 
beginning the strenuous life of nurses' training. 

Those who desire administrative and supervisory careers in 
nursing should plan for a combined five years' course (two years in 
college and three years in nurses' training). Some hospitals, such as 
the Medical Center of Columbia University in New York City, pro- 
vide for the Bachelor of Science decree as well as the nurse's certifi- 
cation at the completion of such a five-year course. 



PREPARATION FOR A CAREER 



49 



A suggested two-year pre-nursing course is as follows : 

First 
Freshman Year Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 

Zoology 3 

Personal Hygiene 1 

Electives: Foreign Language 3 

: Principles of Sociology 3 

: General Chemistry 3 

: History of Western Europe 3 
Physical Education 



Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 

Comparative Anatomy 3 

Bible 2 

General Psychology 3 

Applied Psychology 

Electives: Foreign Language 3 

: American History 3 

: General Chemistry* 3 

: Principles of Sociology* 3 
Physical Education 



Second 
Semester 
3 
3 
1 
9 



PRE-VETERINARY 

Susquehanna offers the two years of college work required for 
entrance into schools of veterinary medicine. The course is as 
follows : 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

v English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

ible 3 3 

jjdry of Western Europe 3 3 

•neral Chemistry 3 3 

w-<3Lm2>£LAsAA 3 3 

Personal Hygiene . 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 3 

vOrganic Chemistry 4 4 

■^ .Comparative-Anatomy . 3 - 8 *""\ 

General Psychology 3 V^V*""" 

Botany ^fodtS^cv $ 3 ^A 

Vlntroductory Physics" 4 4 

Physical Education 1 1 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Those who are interested in this field will find opportunities as 
clinical psychologists in child guidance clinics, school systems, hospi- 

*These courses should be elected if not taken in Freshman Year. 



50 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

tals, and law courts. Positions are also open as industrial psycholo- 
gists with employment offices, in government, industry, or in research. 
Graduate study is necessary for these positions after completing the 
requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in 
psychology. Those interested in clinical psychology should take 
additional work in chemistry and biology, and those interested in 
industrial psychology should take supplementary work in sociology 
and economics. 



SECRETARIAL 

Two, three, and four-year courses for secretaries are available. 
The first two years are outlined below. Those who wish to take a 
four-year course, and prepare for executive and other secretarial 
positions open in the business world to college graduates, may do so, 
and will receive the degree of Bachelor of Science. 



First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Economic Geography 3 3 

Business Mathematics 3 

Elementary Accounting 3 

Shorthand and Typing 5 5 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Bible 2 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 

Business English ! 3 

General Psychology 3 

Machine Accounting 3 

Office Practice 3 

Salesmanship 3 

Intermediate Accounting 3 3 

Typing and Shorthand 5 5 

Physical Education 1 1 

SOCIAL WORK 

Those who are planning to be social workers should take a four 
year liberal arts course with a major in sociology, and additional 
courses in psychology, economics, and similar subjects to provide a 
broad cultural background. Upon graduation from college the 
student who wishes to be a professional social worker should go to a 
specialized graduate school of social work for one or two years. Po- 
sitions as visitors in the Pennsylvania Department of Welfare and 
Public Assistance require graduation from college. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 



ADMISSION 

Susquehanna's policy is one of individualized attention for all stu- 
dents. In line with this policy, provision is made to accept for 
entrance any student with fifteen units from an accredited secondary 
school who shows promise of succeeding in college, regardless of the 
distribution of the high school units. In determining an applicant's 
eligibility for admission, the Committee on Admissions examines evi- 
dence relating to the whole personality of the applicant. This evi- 
dence relates to his scholarship, to his character and ideals, to the 
general character or pattern of his study in high school, to his pur- 
pose in attending college, to his health, and to other points of strength 
or weakness in his school preparation, personality, and general cul- 
tural background. 

A candidate must present evidence of good moral character as 
well as of proficiency in those studies which are prerequisites for 
the curriculum desired. A certificate from the principal or head- 
master of the high school or preparatory school will be accepted as 
evidence that the scholastic requirements for entrance have been met. 

In applying for admission, the student should signify the cur- 
riculum for which he wishes to enroll. A student coming to Susque- 
hanna University from another college is required to submit a tran- 
script of work already completed and a statement of honorable dis- 
missal from each institution previously attended. Special blanks 
will be furnished upon request. 

A student entering Susquehanna University is required to have a 
medical examination before his registration is completed. Blanks 
for this purpose can be secured by applying to the Secretary of 
Admissions. 

All new students are required to take scholastic aptitude tests. 



ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

A minimum of fifteen units is required if the student enters from 
a four-year, fully accredited high school or secondary school, or 
twelve units if he enters from a three-year fully accredited senior 
high school or secondary school. The units should be distributed as 
follows : 

51 



52 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

For the Bachelor of Arts Degree 
The following pattern of subjects is recommended for entrance, 
but those students who desire to pursue this course, and lack one or 
more of these requirements, will be given a chance to correct the 
deficiency during the freshman year.* 

English, 3 units; Foreign Language, 2 units of one language; 
Mathematics (including Algebra and Plane Geometry), 2 units; His- 
tory, 1 unit; Science, 1 unit; and electives to make fifteen units. 

For the Bachelor of Science Degree 

English, 3 units; History, 1 unit; Science, 1 unit, and electives to 
make fifteen units. 

For the Bachelor of Science in Music Education Degree 

Candidates for this degree must present fifteen units of secondary 
school work, and show evidence of aptitude in music. 



REGISTRATION 

At the beginning of the college year each student will be given 
instructions about enrollment in classes and the payment of bills. 

For registration after the day announced, a charge of five dollars 
'will be made. With the exception of war veterans, no students will 
be permitted to register later than two weeks after registration day. 
No course may be changed one week after registration day. If a 
change of registration is made after the one week period, a charge 
of one dollar will be made. A course dropped without the permission 
of the dean and the instructor will be recorded as a failure. 



MARKING SYSTEM AND QUALITY POINTS 

A (90-100) Excellent 3 quality points for each credit hour 

B (80-89) Good 2 quality points for each credit hour 

C (70-79) Average 1 quality point for each credit hour 

D (60-69) Passing quality point for each credit hour 

F (Below 60) Failure No credit unless repeated 

No D grade will be counted towards a major. If a student fails 
to earn a satisfactory grade in a course in his major, the course must 
be repeated at Susquehanna if credit toward his major is desired. 
Summer school work elsewhere will not meet requirements for the 
major. 

•Students planning to take Pre-Medical, Pre-Dental, Pre- Veterinary or other pre- 
professional courses must Batisfy the state requirements for secondary work in these 
professions. In general, these requirements follow the pattern recommended for 
entrance to course leading to the Bachelor of Artx degree. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

SCHOLASTIC REGULATIONS 

A student who fails to earn at least fourteen semester hours credit 
with an equal number of quality points per semester shall be^ on 
scholastic probation. Two successive semesters on scholastic proba- 
tion will automatically cause a student to be dropped from the col- 
lege. Work left incomplete because of illness or other unavoidable 
circumstances must be completed within the next semester in attend- 
ance. 

The normal schedule of a student is sixteen or seventeen credits 
each semester, depending on his total course requirements. To carry 
more than this number, a student must have an average mark of B 
during the preceding semester, and must secure permission from the 
dean. The minimum load of a regular student is fourteen credits 
and the maximum is twenty credits. A special student carrying fewer 
than fourteen hours a week will pay ten dollars per semester hour 
and special fees. There will be no refund for courses dropped two 
weeks after registration day. A transcript and a certificate of 
honorable dismissal will be issued only after full payment of all fees. 

MAJORS AND MINORS 

The courses of study are known as general required courses, 
major courses, minor courses, and elective courses. 

As early as possible, and not later than the end of the sophomore 
year, each candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Arts should 
choose one major field in which he intends to concentrate, and 
one minor field. A major field is one pursued for at least twenty- 
four semester hours, and a minor is one pursued for at least eighteen 
semester hours. The program of major and minor fields shall be 
arranged by the student in consultation with the dean of the college 
and the professor in the field chosen as a major. A major may be 
chosen from the following: 

Biological Sciences Mathematics 

Classical Languages Modern Languages 

Economics Philosophy 

English £JJj^-Lxiuul v Physical Sciences 

History and Political Psychology 

Science Sociology 

No major may be changed except by the consent of the dean and 
the department concerned. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

Susquehanna University offers one curriculum consisting of four 
years of college work leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree. This 
curriculum provides a broad, liberal culture which serves as the 
proper foundation for any of the learned professions or for speciali- 



54 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

zation in graduate study, and provides a broad basis of general 
knowledge. The Bachelor of Arts degree is conferred only after a 
student has satisfactorily completed 132 semester hours with at least 
132 quality points. 

The Bachelor of Science degree is given in Business Administra- 
tion and in Commercial Education upon the completion of 136 semes- 
ter hours with at least 136 quality points. It is also given to those 
students who complete the Soloist Course in the Conservatory of 
Music. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Music Education is awarded 
to those students who complete the public school music courses pre- 
scribed for this degree in the Conservatory of Music. 

Each student will be responsible for keeping his own yearly record 
of the fulfillment of his graduation requirements, so that he may 
know at all times where he stands. Although the office will keep the 
record also and advise the student concerning it, ultimate failure to 
meet any graduation requirement will be the student's responsibility. 

HONORS AT GRADUATION 

Seniors having an average of 2.75 to 3.00 quality points per 
semester hour during their college careers are graduated summa cum 
laude. Those with an average of 2.50 to 2.74 quality points per 
semester hour are graduated magna cum laude. Those with an aver- 
age of 2.25 to 2.49 quality points per semester hour are graduated 
cum laude. Honors are announced at the commencement exercises. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

Freshmen will be given sophomore ranking upon the completion 
of thirty semester hours with as many quality points. Sophomores 
will become juniors upon the completion of sixty-four semester hours, 
with sixty-four quality points. Juniors will become seniors upon 
the completion of ninety-eight semester hours with ninety-eight 
quality points. 

STATEMENT OF CREDITS 

Upon graduation or upon withdrawal before graduation, a stu- 
dent is entitled to one certified statement of his college credits. A 
fee of one dollar is charged for each additional certificate. 

MINIMUM RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS 

To be eligible for graduation, a student must complete the min- 
imum residence requirement of thirty semester hours. Only work 
taken in the regular college classes during the college year will count 
toward this requirement. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 55 

REPORTS 

Reports of students doing unsatisfactory or failing work are made 
to the office at intervals during the semester. Whenever a student 
does unsatisfactory or failing work in two or more subjects, he will 
be asked to confer with the dean and a notice will be sent to the 
parent or guardian. Final reports of the work of each student are 
sent to the parent or guardian at the end of each semester. 

ATTENDANCE REGULATIONS 

Students are expected to attend all classes for which they have 
registered and all chapel services. Absences are counted from the 
first recitation in each course. Ten absences from classes during a 
semester are allowed a student. Absence from a class period twenty- 
four hours before or after a vacation or a holiday will count double. 
An unavoidable absence should be covered by an acceptable excuse 
which must be filed in the office not later than one week after the end 
of the period of absence. For each unexcused absence in excess of 
ten, one-fifth of a semester hour of credit shall be deducted from the 
student's total number of semester hours of credit for that semester. 
A student who has incurred three times as many absences in a course 
as there are semester hours of credit for that course may, at the option 
oFthe instructor in consultation with the dean of the college, be drop- 
ped from that course. For every three unexcused chapel absences, 
one-fifth of a semester hour shall be deducted from the student's total 
number of semester hours for that semester. 

DEAN'S HONOR LIST 

Following each semester examination period, the names of stu- 
dents who have made very high averages for that period will be 
announced by the Dean of the College. Students on the Dean's 
Honor List will be excused from the ordinary attendance regulations 
governing class recitations. They will not be excused from chapel, 
private lesson appointments, and announced recitations or tests. 

THE ACADEMIC YEAR 

As long as returning veterans need to be accommodated, the col- 
lege year will be divided into two long terms of sixteen weeks each 
and two summer terms of six weeks each. For the opening and 
closing dates of these terms see the college calendar on pages 7 and 8. 
Non-veterans will be accepted in the summer terms. 



COURSE REQUIREMENTS ' FOR 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

Susquehanna is primarily a liberal arts college. As such, it seeks 
to give a rich cultural training to its liberal arts students. During 
the first two years of college the student should lay broad foundations 
in the general cultural courses so that in his junior and senior years 
he may work on the more specialized programs required for the 
various professions. 

The course requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree in semes- 
ter hours are as follows : English, 12 hrs. ; Foreign Language, 12 
hrs. ; Science (Science Survey, Chemistry, Physics, Biology) or 
Mathematics, 12 hrs. ; History of Western Europe, 6 hrs. ; American 
History, 6 hrs.; Bible and Religion, 8 hrs.; Psychology, 6 hrs.; 
Personal Hygiene and Physical Education, 8 hrs. These required 
courses total 70 semester hours. In addition, the student will choose 
elective courses in his major and minor fields to bring the grand 
total required for graduation up to 132 semester hours. 

A suggested program of work for the first two years of the liberal 
arts course is as follows : 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 



Second Semester 



English Comp. & Library Sc. _ 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 

History of Western Europe 3 

Bible 2 

Personal Hygiene 1 

Physical Education 1 



English Composition 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 

History of Western Europe 3 

Bible 2 

Personal Hygiene 1 

Physical Education 1 



16 



16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



English Literature 

Christian Philosophy 2 

Foreign Language 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 

General Psychology 3 

American History 3 

Physical Education 1 



18 



English Literature 3 

Ethics 2 

Foreign Language 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 

Educational or Applied 

Psychology 3 

American History 3 

Physical Education 1 



18 



56 




STEELE SCIENCE HALL 



COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 



57 



In the junior and senior years the student will complete any gen- 
eral course requirements still outstanding and specialize in the major 
and minor fields of his own choosing. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
(Business Administration) 

The Bachelor of Science degree is awarded to those who finish the 
four-year course in Business Administration. 

The general course requirements in Business Administration in 
terms of semester hours are English, 9 hrs. ; American Government, 
6 hrs.; American History or Sociology, 6 hrs.; Bible and Religion, 
8 hrs. ; General Psychology, 3 hrs. ; Science or Mathematics, 6 hrs. ; 
Personal Hygiene and Physical Education, 8 hrs. 

The required general courses total 46 semester hours. In addi- 
tion to this, 20 semester hours must be elected in the field of general 
education, and 66 semester hours are required in the field of business 
and economics. This makes a total of 132 semester hours, the num- 
ber required for graduation. 

A £?£«25$SiL P r °gram for the first two years of the Business 
Administration Course is as follows : 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 

English Comp. & Library Sc. __ 3 

Economic Geography 3 

Business Mathematics 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 

Elective , 3 

Personal Hygiene 1 

Physical Education 1 



17 



Second Semester 

English Composition ' 3 

Economic Geography 3 

Elementary Accounting 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 

Elective 3 

Personal Hygiene 1 

Physical Education 1 



17 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



English Literature 3 

Bible 2 

Intermediate Accounting 3 

Economics 21 3 

American History or Sociology 3 

Business Law 29 3 

Physical Education 1 



18 



Business English 3 

Bible 2 

Intermediate Accounting 3 

Economics 22 3 

American History or Sociology 3 

Business Law 30 3 

Physical Education 1 



18 



In the junior and senior years, the student will complete any 
general course requirements still outstanding and will specialize in 
Business Administration courses and allied fields. 



TY 



1 



58 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSI 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
(Commercial Education) 

The Bachelor of Science/ degree is awarded to those who finish 
the four-year course in Commercial Education. This curriculum 
permits its graduates to secure a College Provisional Certificate 
licensing them to teach the commercial subjects in Pennsylvania 
high schools. With jninoiwjhanges, it also, qualifies them to teach 
these subjects in New Jersey and New York. 

The general course requirements for this degree in terms of 
semester hours are English, 12 hrs. ; Bible and Religion, 8 hrs. ; 
Science or Mathematics, 6 hrs. ; General Psychology, 3 hrs. ; Ameri- 
can History, 6 hrs. ; Principles of Economics, 6 hrs. ; American Gov- 
ernment, 6 hrs.; Personal Hygiene and Physical Education, 8 hrs. 

These required courses total 55 semester hours. In addition the 
student will follow courses in Commercial Education to bring the 
grand total to 136 semester hours, required for graduation. 

A suggested program of work for the first two years of the Com- 
mercial Education course is as follows :* 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

— 

First Semester Second Semester 

English Comp. & Library Sc. _ 3 English Composition 3 

Economic Geography 3 Economic Geography 3 

Business Mathematics 3 Elementary Accounting 3 

Elementary Shorthand** 3 Intermediate Shorthand 3 

Elementary Typing** 2 Intermediate Typing 2 

Personal Hygiene 1 Personal Hygiene 1 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

16 16 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

English Literature 3 English Literature 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 Science or Mathematics 3 

Bible 2 Bible 2 

Intermediate Accounting 3 Advanced Typing 2 

Intermediate Shorthand 3 Advanced Shorthand 3 

Intermediate Typing 2 Intermediate Accounting 3 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

17 17 

In the junior and senior years, the student will complete any 
general requirement still outstanding and will specialize in Commer- 

•Students successfully completing the first two years of any of the secretarial cur- 
ricula, (70 semester hours with an equal number of quality points), will be given a 
certificate in Secretarial Studies which will qualify them for employment. 

••Students who have completed the equivalent of these elementary courses in the 
high school will not register for typing and shorthand until the second semester, and 
will then be privileged to graduate with a minimum of 6 hrs. of typing, and 9 hrs. 
of shorthand. 



COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 59 

cial Educational courses as recommended by the Pennsylvania State 
Department of Public Instruction, as follows: 

Junior Year: General Psychology, 3 hrs. Principles of Economics, 
6 hrs. American History, 6 hrs. Advanced Accounting, 3 hrs. 
(elective). Introduction to Teaching, 3 hrs. Shorthand and Typing 
Methods, 2 hrs. bookkeeping"" Methods, 2 hrs. Educational Psy- 
chology, 3 hrs. Salesmanship, 3 hrs. Physical Education, 2 hrs. 
Christian Philosophy, 2 hrs. Business Law, 6 hrs. 

Senior Year: American Government, 6 hrs. Consumer Eco- 
tfwniL , s',"-8~'h'Ts. Office Practice, 3 hrs. Commercial Curriculum, 3 
hrs. Ethics, 2 hrs. Practice Teaching, 6 hrs. Machine Accounting, 
3 hrs. Business English, 3 hrs. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE EST MUSIC EDUCATION 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Music Education is awarded 
to those students who complete 133 semester hours in the Conservatory 
of Music in the curriculum which has been approved by the State 
Council on Education for the preparation of supervisors and teachers 
of public school music in Pennsylvania.* 

*The detailed courses will be found on pages 103-111. 






COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



The courses with odd numbers are given during the first semester, 
and those with even numbers are given during the second semester. 
Courses open primarily to freshmen are numbered eleven to twenty 
inclusive; to sophomores, twenty-one to thirty inclusive; to juniors, 
thirty-one to forty inclusive; and to seniors upward from forty-one. 



AKT 

Mk. Ahl 

22 Akt Appreciation — Ancient 

A general survey of sculpture and painting in Ancient Egypt, 
Mesopotamia, Asia Minor, Greece, and Italy. The most important 
factors that have influenced the arts (religious beliefs; social, eco- 
nomic, and political factors; geography and climate) will be studied. 
The purpose of this course is to supply an elementary equipment for 
critical appreciation and the development of artistic taste. 
Three hours. Three credits. 



BIBLE AND KELIGION 

Mk. Ahl 

Distinctive features of the church college are the development of 
Christian character and the training of its students to be leaders in 
the church and community. The specific objects of this department 
are, therefore, to help the student to appreciate the place of the Bible 
in education ; to give satisfying motivation for living, and power to 
face the problems of life. 

21 Old Testament 

This course acquaints the student with the records, history, cus- 
toms, laws and literature of the Hebrew people. Constant work with 
sources and collateral readings are required. 
Two hours. Two credits. 

60 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 61 

22 New Testament 

The life and teaching of Christ are the natural center of this 
course. An intensive study is made of the Gospels and the Acts of 
the Apostles, with their religious and ethical implications, as well as 
their historical and biographical content. 

Two hours. Two credits. 



31 Christian Philosophy 

A study of the origin, purposiveness of the universe and of man 
in the light of Christian truth, together with an interpretation of 
religious phenomena. Intended to help the student to a constructive 
solution of the ultimate problems of religious belief. 

Two hours. Two credits. 



32 Christian Ethics 

A study of the beginnings and growth of morality, the theories of 
moral life, its relation to religion, and the application of these theories 
in the modern world of moral action. This course covers the moral 
responsibilities in a democratic society as they apply in individual 
and group relations, emphasizing the stabilizing effect of loyalty to 
Jesus in all relationships of life. 
Two hours. Two credits. 



33 Apostolic Period 

In this study, Apostolic Christianity is presented as it is set forth 
in the Acts of the Apostles and in the Epistles of the New Testament, y 
in such a manner as to give a clear view of the historic situation in 
the Roman and Jewish world of the first century in which Christi- 
anity had to gain a foothold. 

Two hours. Two credits 



35 Social Teachings of Jesus 

In search for a solution of the modern problems of society in 
political, institutional, civic and domestic spheres, the attention of 
the student is directed to the Master-Teacher, and to His chosen 
disciples who gave expression in their writings to His principles of 
social behaviour. 

Two hours. Two credits 






62 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

36 Comparative Religion 

The various religions are studied to discover the elements that are 
fundamental in all religious thinking and which point to a divine 
origin of religion itself. The Christian religion is presented as the 
absolute religion which satisfies the whole man in all his needs and 
which reveals these fundamentals in such a way as to be adapted to 
all races of mankind. 
Two hours. Two credits. 

BIOLOGY 

Mr. Scuddeb 

Pre-medical students will select their major and minor from 
biology and chemistry. Either may be chosen as the major, but it is 
urged that at least four years of work be taken in each of these fields. 
In biology, courses 41-42 or 43 and 46 replace 11-12. At least one 
year each of organic chemistry, physics and mathematics must be 
included. 

Courses 11-12, 21-22, 31-32 and electives to make 24 semester 
hours are required for a major. The minor should be chosen from 
another science or from mathematics. At last six semester hours 
must be taken in each of the following;: chemistry, physics, mathe- 
matics. 

Courses 11-12, 21-22 and electives to make IS semester hours are 
required for a minor. At least six semester hours must be taken in 
one of the following: chemistry, physics, mathematics. 

11-12 Botany 

A study of structure and physiology in higher plants with a con- 
sideration of typical life histories of flowering plants, conifers, ferns, 
mosses, fungi and algae. 

Two recitations and one three-hour laboratory period throughout the 
year. Six credits. 

21-22 Zoology 

A survey of the principal groups of animals from the standpoint 
of structure, physiology, the life cycle and biological theory. 
Two recitations and one three-hour laboratory period throughout the 
year. Six credits. 

31-32 Comparative Anatomy 

Both phylogeny and ontogeny are considered in interpreting the 
adult structure of vertebrates. The dogfish, Necturus, and the cat 
are dissected in the laboratory. Prerequisite, Course 21-22. 
Two recitations and one three-hour laboratory period throughout the 
year. Six credits. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 63 

33 Bacteriology 

The classification, structure and physiology of microorganisms 
and their importance in nature and in disease are discussed. Bacteri- 
ological methods are emphasized in the laboratory. Prerequisite, 
Course 11-12 or 21-22. 
Two recitations and one three-hour laboratory period. Three credits. 



35 Heredity 

A study of the manner in which characteristics are transmitted 
from one generation to the next, with a discussion of the application 
of hereditary principles to the improvement of the human race. 
Prerequisite, Course 11-12 or 21-22. 
Three recitations. Three credits. 



41-42 Histology 

A study of the microscopic anatomy of the tissues and organs of 
mammals with a consideration of methods of preparing animal tis- 
sues for microscopic study. Prerequisites, Courses 21-22 and 31-32, 
but may accompany 31-32. Alternates with 43 and 46. 
One recitation and six hours of laboratory. Six credits. 



43 Embryology 

The development of chordates is studied by a brief review of con- 
ditions in Amphioxus and the frog, followed by a fuller consideration 
of young chick embryos. A textbook, whole mounts and serial sec- 
tions are used. Prerequisites, Courses 21-22 and 31-32, but may 
accompany 31-32. Alternates with 41-42. 
One recitation and six hours of laboratory. Three credits. 



46 Physiology 

A study of the manner in which the tissues and organs of the body 
perform their functions. Prerequisites, Courses 21-22 and 31-32, 
but may accompany 31-32. Alternates with 41-42. 
Three recitations. Three credits. 



48 Seminar 

An informal course primarily for majors. A variety of biological 
topics will be discussed or assigned for special reports. Special in- 
terests of individual students will be considered. Given as required. 
One or two recitations. One credit. 



64 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

13 Business Mathematics 

A study of the mathematics of business with special attention to 
short methods of computation. The course includes a review of frac- 
tions, decimals, percentage, profit and loss problems, aliquot parts, 
and bills. A mastery of interest, bank discount, insurance, taxes and 
other allied problems is required of the students. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Reitz 

14 Elementary Principles of Accounting 

A study of the technique of bookkeeping in the ordinary business 
enterprise covering the principles of debiting, crediting, posting, and 
constructing of simplified financial statements. Lectures, problems, 
and laboratory. 

Three hours recitation and two hours laboratory. Three credits. 

Mr. Reitz 

21-22 Intermediate Accounting Theory and Practice 

An intensive as well as extensive study of accounting as applied 
by modern business organizations. Journal columnization, special 
journals, ledgers, controlling accounts, accruals, deferred items, finan- 
cial papers, and work sheets receive special attention. Lectures, 
problems, and practice sets. 

Three recitation hours, two laboratory hours throughout the year. Six 
credits. Mr. Graham 

25 Mathematics of Finance 

The mathematical theory underlying interest, annuities, deprecia- 
tion, mortality, insurance, and investments. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Robison 

29-30 Business Law 

A study of the law as it relates to property and business, which 
considers the following: essential elements of a contract, agency, em- 
ployer and employee, negotiable instruments, suretyship, insurance, 
bailments, carriers, sales, partnerships, corporations, deeds of con- 
veyance, mortgages, landlord and tenant, wills, guardians, and rights 
in property which result from domestic relations. Some attention is 
given to torts, business crimes, and loa;al procedure. 
Three hours throughout the year. Three credits. MR. Graham 

31 Business Law 

This course is a continuation of Business Law 20 and 30 and is 

intended for students who plan to enter the field of a ranting. 

Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Reitz 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 65 

32 Machine Accounting 

The aim of this course is to teach the fundamental principles 
underlying the installation and operation of the recording mechanical 
devices in the modern business office. The place of bookkeeping 
machines in any well proportioned system of record keeping is par- 
ticularly considered. Students are required to complete practice sets 
on the Burroughs, Underwood, and Dalton bookkeeping machines. 
They are also given instruction and work on the various adding and 
calculating machines. Demonstrations and lectures. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Reitz 

34 Business Management 

A study of scientific business management. It includes a consid- 
eration of problems of organization, the plant and its location, factory 
efficiency, labor efficiency, cost analysis, coordination of factory oper- 
ations, and related topics. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. GRAHAM 

35-36 Advanced Accounting 

This course provides theory and problem work in valuation of 
assets and capital stock, investments, funds and reserves, comparative 
statements, analysis of working capital, profit and loss analysis, mis- 
cellaneous ratios, and estate and trust accounting. 

Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. Mr. Reitz 

37 Cost Accounting 

Methods are used to illustrate the finding of the cost of production. 
Problems dealing with determining value of goods in process, budget- 
ary control, and operating expenses are considered. 

Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Reitz 



39-40 Statistical Methods (See Mathematics for the description 

of this course.) 

Mr. Robison 



41 Auditing 

The complete program and procedure of the auditor is studied. 
Current methods used in detecting fraudulent manipulations form a 
most interesting feature of the course. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Reitz 



66 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

42 Federal Tax Accounting 

A study of the Federal Revenue Act. Special attention is given 
to the problems and difficulties arising in the filing of income tax 
returns for the different classes of tax payers. Practical problems 
and questions, including the preparation of actual income tax returns 
on facsimiles of government forms constitute an important part of 
the training. 

Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Reitz 

46 Salesmanship 

Salesmanship has for its basis the influencing of others by adver- 
tising or personal effort. In this course the psychological fundamen- 
tals of argument or reasoning, and suggestion or emotion will be 
stressed. A consideration will be given to a study of the characters 
of others and the qualifications needed by the salesman. 

Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Reitz 

47 Advertising 

A study of the functions, principles, and applications of adver- 
tising. It includes copy writing, layouts, and other factors in the 
preparation of advertisements ; advertising media ; advertising re- 
search; the economic significance of advertising; and related topics. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Graham 

\i 

CHEMISTRY 

bourses 11, 12, 21, 22, 31, 32 and either 41-42, or 4^-44 are re- 
quired! for a major. Those planning to go into Industrial Chemistry 
or Government work in this field should take at least thirty^wo hours. 
Supporting courses for major are : Two years of mathematics, 2 
years of physics, 6 hours of biology. Courses 11, 12 and other 
courses to make 18 semester hours are required for a minor. Sup- 
porting course : one year of mathematics. 

11 General Chemistry 

A study of the occurrence, preparation, properties and uses of 
nonmetallic elements and their chief compounds. The fundamentals 
of chemistry are stressed. Students who have not submitted entrance 
credits in chemistry will comprise the first section. Section two is 
designed for those who have submitted satisfactory entrance credits 
in this subject. 

Two recitation hours, two to three laboratory hours. Three credits. 

Mr. Houtz 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 67 

12 General Chemistry 

The chemistry of the atmosphere and nitrogen and some of their 
most important relations are considered. The occurrence, metallurgy, 
properties and uses of the metallic elements are studied ; a brief 
introduction to the chemistry of the carbon compounds is included. 

Two recitation hours, two to three laboratory hours. Three credits. 

Mr. Houtz 



21 Qualitative Analysis 

The principles of analysis are studied by considering the reactions 
of known metals. The writing of chemical equations, using ionic 
equations is emphasized. The determination of metals in alloys and 
compounds is required. 

Two recitation hours, two to six laboratory hours. Three or four credits. 

Mr. Fisher 



22 Qualitative Analysis 

After a knowledge of the principles and methods of analysis of 
compound substances and mixtures has been obtained, students are 
required to determine at least twenty-five unknown mixtures of 
natural and manufactured products. 

Two recitation hours, three to six laboratory hours. Three or four 
credits. Mr. Fisher 



31 Organic Chemistry 

The alipathic compounds, comprising the saturated and the un- 
saturated carbon compounds, are considered. The reactions involved 
in their preparation, including the writing of chemical equations, are 
stressed. Detailed methods are used, and reactions involved in all 
laboratory work are required. Prerequisites, 11 and 12. 

Two recitation hours, four to six laboratory hours. Four credits. 

Mr. Houtz 



32 Organic Chemistry 

The cyclic compounds, comprising the alicyclic and aromatic com- 
pounds, are considered. Special attention is given to their prepara- 
tion, characteristics and uses. Critical reports of all laboratory work 
are required. Prerequisites, 11, 12 and 31. 

Two recitation hours, four to six laboratory hours. Four credits. 

Mr. Houtz 



68 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

41 Quantitative Analysis 

Standard solutions are prepared. Determinations by neutrali- 
zations in alkalimetry and acidimetry, oxidation and reduction are 
made. Typical known substances are used to acquire knowledge of 
principles of analysis. Tbis is followed by tbe analysis of compounds 
including iron ores, water, limestones, and alloys. 

Two recitation hours, three to six laboratory hours. Three or four 
credits. Mr. Fisher 

42 Quantitative Analysis 

Principles and methods of gravimetric analysis are studied. 
Determinations of copper, barium, sulphate, calcium, silver, chlorine, 
aluminum, potassium, magnesium, phosphates, carbonates, and car- 
bon dioxide are made. Copper, silver, and alloys are determined by 
electroanalysis. 

Two recitation hours, three to six laboratory hours. Three or four 
credits. Mr. Fisher 

43-44 Physical Chemistry 

The object of the course is to give a theoretical reason for the 
statements underlying previous studies in chemistry. With this as a 
background, there are then given the gas laws, elementary thermo- 
dynamics, radio-activity, atomic structure, X-rays, solutions, colloids, 
heterogeneous and homogeneous reactions. A laboratory course par- 
allels the lectures and recitations. Prerequisites, 11, 12, 21, 22. 

Two recitation hours, and two to four laboratory hours throughout the- 
year. Six to eight credits. Mr. Fisher 



COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 

13 Business Mathematics (See Business Administration) 

14. Elementary Principles of Accounting (See Business Admin- 
istration) 

15-16 Typewriting 

Instruction and mastery of the keyboard. The mechanical fea- 
tures of the typewriter. Letter writing, tabulation, and the prepara- 
tion of business papers. 

Five hoi(rs first semester, four hours second seitiCFtcr. Four credits. 

Miss Allison 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 69 

17-18 Gregg Shorthand 

Instruction in the principles of shorthand. Emphasis on both 
reading and writing. Dictation and transcription of practiced 
letters. 

Five hours first semester, three hours second semester. Six credits. 

Miss Allison 

19 Medical Aid and Simple Nursing Techniques 

This course includes the Standard Red Cross First Aid and Home 
Nursing techniques. It is designed to aid the medical secretary in 
dealing with emergencies, and to provide a background of knowledge 
in sickroom procedure, mental and physical hygiene, and sanitation. 
Two hours. One credit. Miss Hein 

20 Medical Terminology 

A study of the prefixes, suffixes, abbreviations, and definitions of 
medical terms is the basis of this course. The student learns the 
vocabulary of medical, anatomical, pathological and scientific terms, 
and studies the derivation and correct spelling and pronunciation of 
these terms. 
Two hours. One credit. Miss Hein 

21-22 Intermediate Accounting Theory and Practice (See Busi- 
ness Administration) 

25-26 Typewriting 

Prerequisite: Commercial Education 16. Perfecting and making 
permanent the skill established in the first year. Speed and ac- 
curacy emphasized. Practice in the writing of manuscripts, legal 
papers, stenciling, business letters, and papers. 
Four hours throughout the year. Four credits. Miss Allison 

27-28 Gregg Shorthand 

Prerequisite: Commercial Education 16 and 18. Advanced 
work in shorthand. Dictation and transcription of business letters, 
technical matter, and radio addresses. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. Miss Allison 



30 Medical Shorthand 

Prerequisite : Commercial Education 26 and 28. A study of 
technical medical terminology; prefixes and suffixes, phrases, and 
special outlines. Dictation and transcription of technical materia 
Not offered in 1946-47. 
Three hours. Three credits. Miss Allison 



i '1 f 






70 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 



32 Machine Accounting (See Business Administration) 



33 Medical Ethics and Office Procedure 

This course is given for medical secretarial students. The aim is 
to provide an understanding of office and hospital ethics, the relation 
of the doctor and the patient, the various specialties in the field of 
medicine, and the business side of a doctor's office dealing with such 
aspects as records, fees, accounts, the doctor and the law, and liability 
and insurance. 

Two hours. Two credits. 



B >€*-&£• 



+u Am 



7? 



Miss Hein 




35 Bookkeeping Teaching Methods 

A comparative study of bookkeeping methods as presented by the 
authors of the leading high school texts together with the modern 
methods of teaching every phase of the subject in secondary schools. 
Lectures, problems, and reference assignments. 

Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Reitz 



37 Shorthand and Typewriting Methods 

Prerequisite : Commercial Education 26 and 28. A critical 
study of objectives, psychological laws underlying skills, organiza- 
tion of materials, tests, and standards of achievement. Special 
attention is given to the different methods of teaching shorthand and 
typewriting. The student is given practice in drawing up lesson 
plans and teaching. Not offered in 1946-47. 

Two hours. Two credits. Miss Allison 



38 Business English 

A course designed to give students an understanding of the service 
of communication to business, and training in the writing of com- 
munication forms in typical business situations. Special attention is 
given to the letter of application and reports. Not given in 1046-47. 
Three hours. Three credits. Miss Allison 



39 Office Practice 

Prerequisite : Commercial Education 26 and 28. A general over- 
view of the function of the office in modern business. A systematic 
coverage of office routines. The uses and operating principles of 
various office machines. 
Three hours. Three credits. Miss ALLISON 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 71 

41 Medical Office Practice 

The practical aspect of the demands on a medical secretary, the 
use of office equipment, sterilization, care and preparation of instru- 
ments. The student learns the use of the clinical thermometer, 
sphygmomanometer; and other simple techniques, such as chemical 
urine analysis, and preparation for examination and minor opera- 
tions. This course includes some practical experience in this work. 
Two hours. Two credits. Miss Hein 

43 The Commercial Curriculum 

A comprehensive treatment of the commercial curriculum of the 
secondary school. Such topics as the origin and development of the 
commercial curriculum, constructive criticisms of existing curricula, 
cardinal principles of commercial education, the curriculum and 
local conditions, construction of curricula, and the curricula of today 
will be studied. Lectures, reference assignments, and reports. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Reitz 

44 Consumer Economics 

The distinctive feature of this course is that it works through 
established economic principles from the consumer point of view. 
The main objective is to discover and point the way toward wiser 
consuming practices calculated to promote human welfare. Such 
topics as intelligent buying of the necessities of life, investments, 
standards for consumers, and government aids to consumers are in- 
cluded in this course. Lectures, reference assignments, and high 
school teaching techniques. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Reitz 

45-46 Practice Teaching (See Education) 



ECONOMICS 

Courses 15, 21, 22, 35, 37, 45 and six hours selected from other 
approved Economics courses are required for a major. Courses 21, 
22, 35, 37, 45 and three hours selected from approved Economics 
courses are required for a minor. 

11-12 Economic Geography 

A study of economic resources and activities in various countries 
of the world, noting especially how these are related to the facts of 
the natural environment. Special attention is given to the United 
States. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. Mr. Graham 



72 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

15 Economic History of the United States 

A study of the history of manufacturing, agriculture, transporta- 
tion, communication, banking, internal and foreign commerce and 
related topics, within the United States. (Same as History 41.) 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Russ 

21-22 Principles of Economics 

A study of the existing economic order and basic economic prin- 
ciples and problems. With reference to goods and services, it deals 
with production, value and price, exchange, distribution, consumption 
and saving, and income and expenditures of government. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. Mr. Graham 

27 Labor Problems 

This is a study of labor problems from the viewpoint of the 
laborer, the employer, and the public. Recent laws will be considered 
relating to social insurance, pensions, wages, and child and woman 
labor. Special consideration will be given to labor organizations 
and their activities. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Graham 

28 Insurance 

A study of principles and problems of insurance. Consideration 
is given to such subjects as rate making, policies, reserves and legal 
control, with reference to various forms of insurance. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Graham 

33 Public Finance 

A study of principles, practices, and problems in public finance. 
Consideration will be aiven to the revenues and the expenditures of 
the federal, state, and local governments, and to related topics. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Graham 

34 Transportation 

A study of economic principles and problems of operation, manage- 
ment, and government regulation, of all tbe important agencies of 
transportation, with special reference to the United States. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Reitz 

35 Money and Banking 

A study of the nature, functions, principles, and problems of 
money, credit, and banking. Special attention will be given to price 
levels, industrial depressions, international exchange, and governmenl 
regulation of money and banking. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Reitz 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 73 

37 Investments 

A study of stocks, bonds, real estate, mortgages, and annuities. 
As related to investments, it includes a consideration of objectives, 
institutions, sources of information, media, analysis of risks and 
returns, and other subjects. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Graham 



45 Marketing 

A study of the principles and practices involved in moving goods 
from tbe various producers to the consumers. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Graham 

48 Foreign Trade 

A study of the theoretical and practical problems involved in the 
sale of goods across national and economic boundaries. A survey 
will be made of world trade resources, markets and exchange prob- 
lems. (Prerequisite: Money and Banking). 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Graham 



EDUCATION 

The requirements for certification to teach in the high schools are 
as follows : 

Pennsylvania: I. Completion of an approved four-year college degree. 
II. Eighteen semester hours in approved professional education distri- 
buted as follows: Introduction to Education (3), Educational Psycholo- 
gy (3), Practice Teaching (6), and 6 hours elective from History of 
Education, Techniques of High School Teaching, Secondary Education, 
Special Methods, and Visual Education. General Psychology is a pre- 
requisite to Educational Psychology. The Special Methods course must 
be in the field of either the major or minor. III. The academic subjects 
require a major of twenty-four semester hours and a minor of eighteen 
semester hours. 

New Jersey: I. Basic for all certificates are (a) for academic sub- 
jects, English, 12 semester hours; social sciences, 12; science, 6; (b) 
for commercial education or music, a total of 30 credits in English, social 
studies, and science. II. Approved professional education distributed as 
follows: health education, 3 semester hours; educational psychology, 3; 
aims and organization of secondary education (principles), 3; principles 
and techniques (general methods), 3; curricula and courses of study 
(special methods), 3; elective, 3; practice teaching and observation, 150 
clock hours. III. Special courses and experience required in the techni- 
cal fields; in academic subjects, 30 credits in the major field, 18 hours in 
a minor, or 12 in each of two or more minors. 



< r 



74 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

New York: I. Completion of an approved four-year curriculum/lead- 
ing to the baccalaureate degree. Thirty credits of advanced work be- 
yond the baccalaureate required for the license to teach academic sub- 
jects. This additional work is not required for a license to teach tech- 
nical subjects. II. Professional requirements are elastic, as follows: 
general and special methods, 4 to 8 semester hours; educational psychol- 
ogy, 2 to 6 hours; history, principles, problems, philosophy of education, 
2 to 6 hours; practice teaching academic subjects, 2 to 6 hours. A mini- 
mum total of 18 semester hours is required. III. A minimum of 18 
semester hours is required in each special academic field to be taught. 
Thirty-six semester hours are required in each of the technical fields. 

Those who are planning to teach must declare it at the end of the 
Sophomore Year. . 



23 Introduction to Education 

An orientation course for all who have signified their intentions 
to become teachers. The evolution of our educational system, teach- 
ing problems, the learning process, the curriculum, changing concep- 
tions of education. School visitation, with written report of observa- 
tions, required of each student. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Galt 



24 Educational Psychology 

A study of the laws, characteristics, and economy of the learning 
process with applications to school subjects. General psychology is 
a prerequisite. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Galt 



31 History and Principles of Education 

A study of the historical developments of education from the early 
beginnings to the present day. Special emphasis on the origin and 
development of American educational institutions. A study of pres- 
ent day tendencies and practices. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Waterbury 



32 Techniques of High School Teaching 

The principles underlying the selection and organization of sub- 
ject matter, and the development of skills, habits, ideals and attitudes 
in connection with the various school subjects. Principles that should 
guide the teacher in controlling conduct and building character. 
Each student will be required to teach a demonstration lesson in the 
presence of the instructor and the members of the class. 
Three hours. Three credits. Required of all liberal arts juniors en- 
tering teaching. Mr. Galt 






COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 75 

33 Secondary Education 

A study of the nature of the growth and development of the physi- 
cal, mental, emotional, moral, and religious life of the pupils begin- 
ning with childhood and extending through adolescence with the 
necessary educational implications. The place of the school in the 
life of the pupil. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Waterbury 

44 Visual Education 

Study of audio-visual and other sensory aids in education. Lab- 
oratory work in the use of objects, specimens, graphs, charts, maps, 
pictures, the stereograph, the opaque projector, the film slide, and 
silent and sound motion picture projectors. Offered only in summer 
term. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Galt 

45-46 Practice Teaching 

Observation and practice teaching in the public high schools. Ob- 
servation, conferences, reports, lesson plans, and teaching. A 
laboratory fee is charged. 

Six credits. Mr. Waterbury 

Mr. Reitz 

47-48 Methods in Specific Subjects 

Courses in methods are given either in the first or second semester 
by the departments for the purposes of training teachers. It is recom- 
mended that one special methods course in addition to the general 
methods course be taken by each student preparing to teach. Courses 
are offered in English, social studies, mathematics, sciences, commer- 
cial education, and music. 



ENGLISH 

Courses 21, 22, 31, 32, 41, 42, and additional hours chosen from 
courses 33, 34, 35, 36, 43, and 44 to total twenty-four hours are 
required for a major. Courses 21, 22, 31, 32, 41, 42, and additional 
hours chosen from Courses 33, 34, 35, 36, 43, and 44 to total eighteen 
hours are required for a minor. Courses 11, 12, 21, 22 are required 
for the necessary twelve hours of English. 

11-12 Composition 

A year course in the three forms of discourse : narration, descrip- 
tion, and exposition. The instruction aims to aid the student to 
express himself clearly and grammatically, and to correct any habit 
of slipshod, inaccurate thinking. 



76 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Laboratory work is designed as a corrective program to provide 
for the student a thoroughly individualized study to meet his special 
personal needs, in addition to his group work in the three recitation 
hours weekly. Students may be excused from the laboratory hour at 
the discretion of the instructor. 

Library Science is also a required part of Composition 11-12 and 
is designed to acquaint the student with the basic library tools, 
through independent research. It consists of one hour a week for 
ten weeks during one semester, and for that semester it will count as 
one-fourth of the final grade in Composition. 

May not be counted toward a major or a minor. 
Three recitation hours, two laboratory hours throughout the year. Six 
credits. Miss Kolpin, Mr. Gilbert and Mr. Wilson 

21 Survey of English Literature and Language 

From the beginning to 1800. An historical study of the develop- 
ment of English literature in its various forms and movements, com- 
bined with a study of the English language, its origin, structure, 
relation to other languages, development, borrowings, and general 
history. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Wilson 

22 Survey of English Literature and Language 

From 1800 to the present day. In manner and method, a con- 
tinuation of English 21. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Wilson 

23-24 Journalism 

An introduction to the business of conducting a newspaper, with 
specific practice in reporting, editorial writing, feature article writing, 
make up, and other activities connected with the weekly appear- 
ance of the college newspaper, The Susquehanna. Open to freshmen, 
but credit given only in the three upper classes. 
One recitation hour throughout the year. Two credits. Mr. Wilson 

25-26 Debating 

The principles of public speaking. The activities of this course 
include organized intercollegiate debates at home and on other cam- 
puses. Open to freshmen, but credit given only in the three upper 
classes. (See Speech). 
One recitation hour throughout the year. Two credits. Mr. Gilbert 

28 Public Speaking 

Emphasis on the practice of speaking in public, together with the 
content and composition of a speech. (See Speech.) 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Gilbert 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 77 

31 American Literature 

From the beginning to Henry James. An historical study of the 
various forms and movements of our native writing. Alternates with 
41. Given 1945-46. 

Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Wilson 

32 American Literature 

From Henry James to the present day. A continuation of Eng- 
lish 31. Alternates with 42. Given 1945-46. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Wilson 

33 English Drama 

An historical survey of dramatic literature in England, not in- 
cluding the works of Shakespeare, with attention to European and 
American drama. Alternates with 35. Given 1945-46. 

Two hours. Two credits. MR. WILSON 



34 Contemporary Drama 

British, Continental, and American drama from Ibsen to the 
present day. Alternates with 36. Given 1945-46. 

Two hours. Two credits. MR. WILSON 

35 English Novel 

An historical development of the novel from its beginnings to 
the close of the nineteenth century, with particular emphasis on its 
development in England. Alternates with 33. Given 1946-47. 

Trvo hours. Two credits. Mr. Wilson 

36 English Novel 

A study of a group of novels representative of phases of develop- 
ment in the contemporary British novel from Henry James to Vir- 
ginia Woolf. Alternates with 34. Given 1946-47. 

Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Wilson 

41 Shakespeare 

Plays before 1600. Particular study of the comedies and his- 
tories, with a careful consideration of Shakespeare's workmanship. 
Alternates with 31. Given 1946-47. 

Two hours. Two credits. MR. WILSON 



78 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

42 Shakespeare 

Plays after 1600. Particular study of the tragedies, through 
Shakespeare's manner and method of composition. Alternates with 
32. Given 1946-47. 

Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Wilson 

43 English Poetry 

From 1500 to 1798. An historical survey of poetry in England 
from the early Renaissance to the Romantic Movement. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Wilson 

44 English Poetry 

From 1798 to the present day. A continuation of 43. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Wilson 



FRENCH 



Miss Kline 



Courses 45 and 46 and electives in advance of 11-12 to make a 
total of 24 hours are required for a major. 

Courses totaling 18 hours in advance of 11-12 are required for 
a minor. Students planning to teach should include courses 45 and 
46 in the 18 hours. 

Students choosing a French major are urged to elect a minor in 
another foreign language. It is also recommended that they elect 
related courses in history, art, philosophy, and other languages and 
literature. 

11-12 Elementary French 

A course in pronunciation, in the elements of grammar with oral 
and written exercises to illustrate their application, and in reading, 
writing and speaking simple French. For students who have had 
one year of French or no French in high School. May not be counted 
toward a major. 
Four hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

21-22 Intermediate French 

A careful review of grammar. Practice in speaking and writing 
French. Special emphasis on the reading of the short story and the 
drama. Prerequisite, French 11-12 or two years of high school 
French. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 79 

31-32 French Literature of the 17th Century 

A study of the origin and development of French classicism with 
particular attention to comedy and tragedy. Lectures in French, 
collateral reading and discussion. Prerequisite: French 21-22. 
Alternates with French 43-44. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

41-42 French Literature of the 19th Century 

A study of Romanticism and Realism with special emphasis on 
the works of Lamartine, DeVigny, DeMusset, Hugo, Sand, Balzac, 
Flaubert, Zola, Daudet, Loti and Anatole France. Lectures in 
French, collateral reading and discussion. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

43-44 Survey of French Literature 

A study and comparison of the main currents of French literature 
from its inception to the present day. This course is designed chiefly 
for seniors majoring in French who wish to organize and synthesize 
their knowledge of French literature as a whole. Alternates with 
French 31-32. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

45-46 Advanced Composition and Conversation 

A course to enable the student to write and speak French as fluent- 
ly as possible. Includes a study of phonetic symbols, practice in 
pronunciation and drill in the use of common idioms. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 



GENERAL SCIENCE 
11-12 Science Survey 

The first semester's work includes a survey of the physical sciences 
with applications to modern life. The second semester's work in- 
cludes a survey of the biological sciences as aids in man's cultural 
development. 

Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

Messrs. Fisher, Houtz, Scudder 

33 Geology, Structural, Dynamic 

A study of the formations of the earth around us, by lecture, field 
excursions, and laboratory studies. Our surroundings are unusually 
favorable for practical geological studies in the caves, mines, valleys 
and mountains in this region. 

Two recitation hours, two hours of laboratory or field work. Three 
credits. Mr. Fisher 



80 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

GERMAN 

Mr. Gilbert 

Courses 21, 22, 41, 42 and electives in advance of 11-12 to com- 
plete a total of 24 hours are required for a major. 

Courses 21, 22, 41, 42 and electives in advance of 11-12 to make 
a total of 18 hours are required for a minor. 

11-12 Beginning German 

A course in the minimum essentials of grammar to make possible 
a good reading knowledge of the language, including practice in 
simple conversation. Reading of simple stories with attention to 
their folklore, history, and characteristic atmosphere. May not be 
counted toward a major or minor. 
Three or four hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

21-22 Intermediate German 

Modern Novellen, poetry, and other works of medium difficulty 
will be read. Every effort will be made to increase the student's 
active vocabulary by means of composition and conversation. The 
reading of works outside the classroom aids in increasing the under- 
standing of printed German. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

31-32 German Drama of the 19th Century 

Emphasis will be placed upon romanticism, realism, and natural- 
ism, the characteristic literary attitudes of the period. The drama 
will be interpreted also as the outgrowth of the personality of such 
writers as Kleist, Grillparzer, Hebbel, Wagner and Hauptmann. 
Alternates with 33-34. Not given 1946-47. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

33-34 The German Novelle of the 19th Century 

The development of this form will be traced by the reading of 
important Novellen of each literary trend of the 19th century. 
Alternates with 31-32. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

41-42 German Composition and Conversation 

A course to give the student an excellent working knowledge of 
German grammar, and to increase his ability to use the spoken and 
the written word. The work will be based largely on toxts dealing 
with German life, history and art. 
Two hours throughout the year. Four credits. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 81 

43-44 German Literature of the 18th Century 

Representative works of the period will be read to reveal the per- 
sonality of such writers as Lessing, Goethe and Schiller, and to show 
the development of sentimentalism, storm and stress, classicism and 
romanticism. Alternates with 45-46. 

Two hours throughout the year. Four credits. 



45-46 History of the German Language and Literature 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the develop- 
ment of the German language and literature. Middle High German 
will be studied and read to make the student conscious of linguistic 
changes. Through contact with works not read previously, the 
student gains a more comprehensive knowledge of German literature. 
Recommended only for majors. Alternates with 43-44. Not given 
1946-47. 

Two hours throughout the year. Four credits. 



GREEK Mr. Ahl 

Courses 11, 12, 21, 22, and any two from 31-32, 33, 34, 35-36, 
43-44, are required for a major. Courses 11, 12, 21, 22, and elec- 
tives in advance of 21, 22 to make a total of 18 hours are required 
for a minor. 



11-12 Elementary Greek 

Emphasis will be laid on the acquisition of a knowledge of the 
fundamental principles of Greek grammar and syntax. Easy selec- 
tions from Greek literature, illustrating the grammar and syntax 
studied, will be read. 

Four hours throughout the year. Six credits. 



21 Epic Poetry 

Selections from Homer's Iliad with special attention to develop- 
ing facility in reading and in the mastery of syntax. The Greek epos 
is considered as an expression of the thought and general conditions 
of early Greek life. 

Three hours. Three credits. 



82 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

22 Prose Literature 

A study of Plato's Apology and Crito or similar writings. Special 
consideration is given to the study of the character of Greek thought 
and the men who taught Greek youth the meaning of "reasoned 
truth." 
Three hours. Three credits. 

31-32 Greek Drama 

Aristophanes, the Clouds; Sophocles, Oedipus Tyrannus and An- 
tigone; Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound; Euripides, Alcestis. As many 
as possible of these selections will be studied with special attention to 
metre and scenic antiquities. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

33 Greek Life and Thought 

A survey of the religious and social life of the ancient Greeks. 
Mythology, its influence on English literature, and on art in general, 
the social life as expressed in the national games, customs, education, 
public life of the citizen, including law and government will be 
studied. Special emphasis will be placed on Greek contributions to 
modern civilization. No knowledge of the Greek language is required 
for this course. 
Two hours. Two credits. 

34 Greek Literature in English 

A survey of Greek literature with an intensive study in English 
translation of literary masterpieces. Text book, recitations, lectures, 
assigned library work, selected from the ancient writers and other 
relevant books. Of interest especially to students of English, the 
classics and history. 
Two hours. Two credits. 

35-36 New Testament Greek 

A rapid reading course, designated primarily for candidates for 
the ministry and religious workers; a linguistic and historical inter- 
pretation of the New Testament. Selections from the historical and 
didactic literature. Prerequisite, Greek 21, 22, or equivalent. Alter- 
nates with 31 and 32. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

43-44 New Testament Greek 

A continuation of courses 35-36 with different selections. Alter- 
nates with 35-36. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION fl^^t 83 

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

The courses which may be taken for a major (24 Hrs.) are 11-12, 
21-22, 31-32, and 41-42. The required supplementary courses to 
the major are principles of Economics (6 hrs.), Principles of So- 
ciology (6 hrs.) The required courses for a minor (18 hrs.) are 
21-22, 31-32 and 41-42, taken in that order if possible. The required 
supplementary course to the minor is Principles of Economics (6 
hrs.). Majors who feel they may go on to graduate school are urged 
to take Course 44. 

11-12 History or Western Europe 

A survey of the history of Western Europe and the expansion of 
European civilization around the globe. The period covered is from 
the fall of the West Roman Empire to the present. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. Mr. Russ 

13 History of Civtlization 

A brief basic survey of the whole field of history. Special 
emphasis is placed on man's cultural achievements in the political, 
social, religious, intellectual, artistic and economic fields. Human 
ideals and institutions are studied in their general outline, and an 
attempt is made to trace the continuity of culture through the cen- 
turies. Recommended for Public School Music students. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Ahl 

21-22 History of the United States and of Pennsylvania 

A narrative history which begins with the discovery of America 
and carries the story to the present. This course fulfills the require- 
ment as laid down by the Pennsylvania State Council of Education. 
It must be taken by all prospective teachers. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. Mr. Russ 

31-32 American Government 

A study of Federal government during the first semester; state 
and local during the second. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. Mr. Russ 

33-34 Ancient History 

A brief survey of the ancient world, covering the history of the 
monarchies of the Near East, the rise of democracy in Greece, and 
the story of Rome down to the Barbarian invasions. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. Mr. Ahl 



84 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

41. Economic History of the United States 

A study of the history of manufacturing, agriculture, transporta- 
tion, communication, banking, internal and foreign commerce and 
related topics, within the United States. (Same as Economics 15.) 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Russ 

42 World Problems 

An analysis of the twenty years prior to the opening of World 
War II. The objectives are to study the reasons for the failure to 
create permanent peace after 1918 and to examine the possibilities of 
winning the peace after the present conflict. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Russ 

43 Pennsylvania History 

A survey of Pennsylvania as colony and state. Alternates with 
No. 44. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Russ 

44 Seminar 

A course in historiography and the methods of research. The 
purpose is to teach the student, who intends to go to graduate school, 
the mechanics of historical writing. Alternates with No. 43. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Russ 



LATIN 

Courses 13-14, 21-22, 31-32, 36 and two courses selected from 
33, 34, 35 are required for a major. Supporting course : 3 hours 
of Ancient History. Courses 13, 14, 21, 22, 31, 32 are required for a 
minor. Students majoring or minoring in Latin should elect at 
least one year's work in Greek, and have a reading knowledge of 
either French or German. 

The composition course is required for those who plan to do grad- 
uate work or teach. 



11-12 Beginning Latin 

A study of pronunciation, essential form?, and the principles of 
syntax. The aim of this course is to develop as quickly as possible 
an ability to read Latin in simpl° texts. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 85 

13-14 Intermediate Latin 

Selected orations of Cicero with supplementary reading in Eng- 
lish, Vergil's Aeneid, including a study of the poem as a whole, its 
sources, poetical diction and its mythological background. Prereq- 
uisite, two years of high school Latin. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

21-22 Ovid and Catullus 

Selections from Ovid's Metamorphoses. Shorter poems of Catul- 
lus. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

31-32 Horace 

Selections from Horace's Odes, Epodes, Satires, and Epistles. A 
study of Horace as a satirist, philosopher, lyric poet, and literary 
critic by a representative study of his words. Prerequisite, Latin 13 
and 14, or four years of high school Latin. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

33 Roman Drama 

Selected plays of Plautus and Terence. Collateral reading on the 
origin, development and technique of Roman comedy. Alternates 
with 35. 
Three hours. Three credits. 

34 Roman Historic Writers 

Passages from Livy's Ab Urbe Condita dealing with the mythical 
age of Roman kings. Selections from Suetonius and Tacitus will be 
studied in the light of their contribution to Roman imperial history. 
Alternates with 36. 
Three hours. Three credits. 



35 Martial 

Martial's Epigrams ; a study of the epigram as a literary form ; 
its source and influence. Alternates with 33. 
Three hours. Three credits. 

36 Latin Language and Prose Composition 

A review of forms and of principles of syntax, drill in reading 
and writing Latin, and a study of Latin style and idiom. Alternates 
with 34. 
Three hours. Three credits. 



86 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

MATHEMATICS 

Courses 13, 14, 21, 22, and ten additional hours are required for 
a major. Courses 13, 14, 21, 22, and four additional hours are 
required for a minor. 

11 Introduction to College Mathematics 

An introduction to the study of the elementary mathematical 
functions. This course is designed for those whose high school mathe- 
matics have not been sufficient. 
Five hours. No college credit. Mr, Houtz 

13 College Algebra 

An introduction to the study of elementary algebraic func- 
tions and the solution of equations. Also progressions, permutation 
combinations, probabilities and determinants. 
Five hours. Three credits. Mr. Robison 

14 Trigonometry 

The study of the trigonometric functions and logarithms with 
application to triangles. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Robison 

21-22 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 

A study is made of systems of coordinates and the relation between 
equations and loci. The concepts and fundamental formulae of dif- 
ferentiation and integration are studied and applied to problems in- 
volving maxima and minima, lengths, areas and volumes. Prerequi- 
site, Courses 13 and 14. 
Five hours throughout the year. Ten credits. Mr. Robison 

25 Mathematics of Finance (See page 64 for description of this 
course.) 

31 The Foundation of Algebra and Geometry 

A critical analysis of the fundamental concepts and methods of 
reasoning in mathematics. Alternates with 33. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Robison 

32 The Teaching of Mathematics 

A course in the methods of teaching mathematics in the secondary 
schools. Alternates with 34. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mb. Robison 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 87 

33 Advanced Calculus 

A study of the theoretical aspects of calculus, with particular 
emphasis on infinite processes and the concepts of limit and continu- 
ity. Prerequisite, Courses 21 and 22. Alternates with 31. 

Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Robison 

34 Advanced Calculus 

A continuation of Course 33, which is a prerequisite for it. Al- 
ternates with 32. 

Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Robison 

35 Differential Equations 

The formation and geometrical meaning of differential equations 
and the standard methods of solution. Prerequisite, Courses 21 and 
22. 

Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Robison 

37 Navigation 

A descriptive study of the problems of air navigation as outlined 
by the Civil Aeronautics Administration. The course includes a 
detailed study of meteorology insofar as it affects the handling of 
aircraft. Prerequisite, Mathematics 13-14. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Houtz 



38 Surveying 

Classroom work and field practice in the care and use of surveying 
instruments, running lines and levels, establishing grades, plotting 
and computing areas, running profiles and cross sections. Stress is 
put on the use of the plane table and stadia. Prerequisite, Mathe- 
matics 13-14. 

Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Houtz 



39-40 Statistical Methods 

Methods of analyzing and presenting numerical data, with refer- 
ence to probability, averages, and measures of correlation. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. Mr. Robison 



88 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

MUSIC 

21-22 History of Music 

A survey of the development of music from its beginning to the 
present. Current events related to the subject matter of the course 
are brought to the attention of the class. 

Course same as Music 17-18. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. Mrs. Sheldon 

30 Music Appreciation 

A course to develop an intelligent appreciation of music. For 
description, see Music 42. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mrs. Giauque 

The above courses are for Liberal Arts students. For complete 
description of courses offered in the Conservatory of Music, see p. 103. 



PHILOSOPHY 

Courses 31, 32, 33, 34, 41, 42, and Psychology 21, 24, are required 
for a major. 

31 Logic 

The guiding principles and conditions of correct thinking, the 
nature of the deductive and the inductive processes, and the basis of 
the scientific method. 
Three hours. Three credits. 

32 Introduction to Philosophy 

An attempt to get a clear understanding of metaphysical reality 
and to present the fundamental facts and principles in relation to 
the categories of thought. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Ahl 

33 Ancient and Mediaeval Philosophy 

The history of the progress of philosophical thinking from the 
early Greek philosophers to the Renaissance. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Ahl 

34 Modern Philosophy 

The history of the progress of philosophical thinking from the 
Renaissance to the present time. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Ahl 

41 Philosophical Readings 

Selections from the writings of Plato, Aristotle, Epictetns, Cicero, 
Bacon, Hobbes, Descartes, Locke. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mn. Dunkelberger 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 89 

42 Modern Philosophers 

The philosophies of James, Royce, Bergson, Dewey, and San- 
tayana. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Dunkelberger 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Courses for Men Mr. Stagg 

The war has caused a marked change in the program of required 
classes in Physical Education. The purpose to develop the physical 
well being of the student remains the same, but greater emphasis is 
placed on rugged health, endurance, strength and agility, as goals to 
attain. In addition, qualities of character such as courage, daring, 
poise under emotional strain, confidence in one's self and fair play 
are fostered. 

11-12M Physical Education 

Required in all college curricula. Covering the period from the 
opening of college to the Thanksgiving recess, the activities include 
calisthenics, football, soccer, touch football, combative games, track, 
golf and tennis. From the Thanksgiving recess to the spring recess, 
the classes meet in the gymnasium and the work consists of calis- 
thenics, informal gymnastics, basketball, volley ball, indoor baseball, 
handball and boxing. From the spring recess to commencement, the 
activities include calisthenics, soft ball, track, baseball, combative 
games, tennis, hiking and golf. Classroom instruction is assigned. 
Three hours throughout the year. Two credits. 

21-22M Physical Education 

Required in all college curricula. The plan and nature of the 
work is similar to Course 11-12. Classroom instruction as assigned. 
Three hours throughout the year. Two credits. 

31-32M Physical Education 

Required in all college curricula. A continuation of course 21-22 
with the privilege of a wider range of sports, and recreational activi- 
ties upon an elective basis. Classroom instruction as assigned. 
Three hours throughout the year. Two credits. 

15-1 6M Physical Education — Restricted Activities 

These courses are planned in consultation with the student's physi- 
cian to meet the needs of individual students who are unable to pur- 
sue the regular courses. Classroom instruction as assigned. 
Two hours throughout the year. Two credits. 

13-14M Personal Hygiene 

This course presents a wide range of materials concerning health- 
ful living. 
One hour throughout the year. Two credits. 



90 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Coubses foe Women 

11-12^" Physical Education 

A foundation course which aims to build a vital interest in team 
games. Hockey, soccer, volley ball, and basketball are played. 
Round Robin Tournament in each activity. Badminton and tennis 
in the second semester. Classroom instruction as assigned. 
Two hours throughout the year. Two credits. 

13-14W Personal Hygiene 

This course presents a wide range of scientific and educational 
materials. Information is presented through lectures, guided dis- 
cussions, surveys, group health projects, and term papers. 
One hour throughout the year. Two credits. 

15-1 6W Physical Education 

These courses are planned in consultation with the student's phy- 
sician to meet the needs of individual students who are unable to 
pursue the regular courses. Classroom instruction as assigned. 
Two hours throughout the year. Two credits. 

19-20W EURYTHMICS AND FOLK DANCING 

Designed especially to meet the needs of students in the Public 
School Music Course. Course same as Music 19, 20. 
Two hours throughout the year. Two credits in Music Curricula. 

21-22W Physical Education 

A course designed to improve fundamental skills and technique 
throughout the team games. A wide range of folk dance material is 
presented in the second semester. Instruction in tennis. 
Two hours throughout the year. Two credits. 

31-32W Physical Education 

A course similar in nature to 21-22"W. Classroom instruction as 
assigned. Badminton and Archery in the second semester. Tourna- 
ments and meets will be planned by students. 
Two hours throughout the year. Two credits. 

41-42 Physical Education 

A course which emphasizes leadership in team games. The 
students plan and manage the intramural program. Instruction in 
coaching and officiating. Tap dancing and golf instruction will be 
given in the second semester. 
Two hours throughout the year. Two credits. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 91 

PHYSICS Me. Robison 

Courses 11-12 or 13-14 and 16 semester hours of advanced physics 
are required for a major. The selection of these courses and sup- 
porting fields is to be made in conference with the professor of 
physics in accordance with the student's aims and ability. Courses 
11-12 or 13-14 and 10 semester hours of advanced physics are re- 
quired for a minor. 

11 Introductory Physics 

A course in mechanics, heat and sound. Prerequisites, plane 
geometry and algebra. 
Three lectures, one double laboratory period per week. Four credits. 

12 Introductory Physics 

A continuation of Physics 11, taking up electricity, magnetism 
and light. 
Three lectures, one double laboratory period per week. Four credits. 

13 General Physics 

A course in mechanics, heat, and sound. Not open to students 
who have credits in Course 11-12. Prerequisite, trigonometry. This 
course is recommended for all students whose major is physics, 
mathematics, chemistry, or biology. 
Three lectures, one double laboratory period per week. Four credits. 

14 General Physics 

This is a continuation of Physics 11 and 13, taking up electricity 
magnetism, and light. 
Three lectures, one double laboratory period per week. Four credits. 

16 Aerodynamics 

A study of the motion of air and other forces on solids in motion, 
as applied to the theory of flight. 
Two lectures. Two credits. 

21 Sound 

A study of sound and some of the phenomena associated with it. 
Three lectures. Three credits. 

23-24 Radio 

A study of the principles of radio communication. 
Lectures and laboratory. Six credits. 

31 Light 

A study of the theories of physical optics and an introduction to 
modern spectroscopy. 
Lectures and laboratory. Three or four credits. 



92 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

32 Heat 

A study of heat and the laws of thermodynamics. 
Three lectures. Three credits. 

33-34 Introduction to Theoretical Mechanics 

Prerequisites, Mathematics 23, 24; Physics 11, 12, or 13, 14. 
Three lectures throughout the year. Six credits. 

35-36 Electricity and Magnetism 

Prerequisites, Mathematics 21, 22; Physics 11, 12 or 13, 14. 
Three lectures, one double laboratory period throughout the year. Eight 
credits. 



PSYCHOLOGY 

21 General Psychology 

An introductory course covering the entire field, designed to 
develop a scientific attitude toward psychological problems. A 
description of the receiving, connecting, and re-acting mechanisms. 
A survey of the emotions, sense-perception, imagery, attention, rea- 
soning, learning. Behavior is considered as environmental adjust- 
ment. This course is prerequisite for other courses in psychology. 

Three hours, one hour laboratory per week. Three credits. 

Mr. Waterbury 

22 Educational Psychology 

A study of the laws, characteristics, and the economy of the 
learning process with application to school subjects. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Galt 

24 Applied Psychology 

The principles of psychology applied to the vocations, business 
and industry. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Waterbury 

33-34 Abnormal Psychology and Mental Hygiene 

A study of personality traits, attitudes, emotions, inhibitions, 
complexes and the conditions requisite for mental health; abnormal 
mental conditions, forms of insanity, and mental deficiency. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. Mr. Dunkelberger 

41 Social Psychology 

A study of the interaction of individuals in their several group 
relations, the contacts of harmony, and conflict within groups as well 
as between groups, group controls, and the phenomena of imitation 
and suggestion. Course same as Sociology 41. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Dunkelberger 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 93 

43 Psychological Tests and Personnel Techniques 

The theory and practical application of individual and group 
psychological tests and personnel techniques. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Dunkelberger 

44 Childhood and Adolescence 

A study of the nature of the growth and development of the 
physical, mental, emotional, moral, and religious life of the pupils 
beginning with childhood and extending through adolescence with 
the necessary educational implications. The place of the school in 
the life of the pupil. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Waterbury 



SOCIOLOGY 

Mr. Dunkelberger 
21-22 Principles of Sociology 

A systematic study of the fundamentals of human society such as 
the social processes, factors, functions, products, and underlying 
principles. Prerequisite : Sophomore standing. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

31-32 Modern Social Problems 

The aim of the course will he to locate the significant problems of 
present-day society and to evaluate the current approaches to them. 
Among these problems are those of population, race, labor, delin- 
quency, poverty and dependence, and problems peculiar to rural and 
urban life. Prerequisite : Sociology 21-22. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

41 Social Psychology 

A study of the interaction of individuals in their several group 
relations, the contacts of harmony, and conflict within groups as well 
as between groups, group leadership and group controls, the phenom- 
ena of imitation and suggestion. Course same as Psychology 41. 
Prerequisites: Sociology 21-22; Psychology 21. 
Three hours. Three credits. 

43 Introduction to Social Work 

An introductory course covering the scope and function of the 
different fields of social work. The work of the classroom is supple- 
mented by special lectures and seminars by officials of the various 
social agencies. 
Three hours. Three credits. 



94 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

44 Anthropology 

As a background for the studies of sociology and philosophy, a 
course of three hours is offered in anthropology with special emphasis 
on its cultural aspect. 
Three hours. Three credits. 

46 The Family as a Social Institution 

The origin and development of the family, function, and rela- 
tion to other primary and secondary groups; the problems of family 
life and how to meet them. Prerequisite : Sociology 21. 
Three hours. Three credits. 



SPANISH 

Miss Kline 

Courses 45 and 46 and electives in advance of 11-12 to make a 
total of 24 hours are required for a major. 

Courses totaling 18 hours in advance of 11-12 are required for a 
minor. Students planning to teach should include courses 45-46 in 
the 18 hours. 

Students choosing a Spanish major are urged to elect a minor in 
another foreign language. It is also recommended that they elect 
related courses in history, art, philosophy, and other languages and 
literature. 

11-12 Elementary Spanish 

A course in pronunciation, elements of grammar and in reading, 
writing and speaking simple Spanish. Some time is devoted to the 
introduction to Spanish civilization and culture. May not be count- 
ed toward a major or minor. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

21-22 Intermediate Spanish 

A course in grammar, conversation and reading of Spanish and 
Spanish-American prose. Prerequisite: Spanish 11-12 or two years 
of high school Spanish. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

31-32 Survey of Spanish Literature 

Lecture and reading course. Study of representative authors 
with special emphasis on the Golden Age and its achievement. Col- 
lateral reading, reports and discussion. Prerequisite: Spanish 21-22. 
Alternates with Spanish 43-44. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 95 

33-34 Modern Drama 

A study of the drama from the romanticists to the present. Head- 
ings with reports and discussion of representative works of Hartzen- 
busch, Echegaray, Galdos, Benavente, los Quinteros and other authors. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 



41-42 Modern Novel 

A critical study of literary movements since 1850, as exemplified 
in the works of such novelists as Pardo Bazan, Galdos, Valdes, Pio 
Baroja and Valle Inclan. Collateral reading, reports and discussion. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 



43-44 Spanish American Literature 

A study of the development of Spanish American literature from 
its beginnings. Collateral reading, reports and discussion. Alter- 
nates with Spanish 31-32. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 



45-46 Advanced Composition and Conversation 

Intensive study of grammar. Oral and written themes, letters, 
etc. ; class conversation and ear-training. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 



SPEECH 







25-26 Debating Mr. Gilbert 



The principles of discussion and debate. The activities of this 
course include organized intercollegiate debates. Open to freshmen, 
but credit given only in the three upper classes. 
One recitation hour throughout the year. Two credits. 

28 Public Speaking 

Emphasis on the practice of speaking in public, together with the 
content and composition of a speech. 
Three hours. Three credits. 



THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



The Conservatory of Music of Susquehanna University offers 
complete courses of instruction in Pianoforte, Singing, Violin, Organ, 
and Public School Music. The courses are planned with a view to 
developing a high degree of musicianship in students, giving them, 
besides the technique of their special study, that comprehensive insight 
into the nature and structure of music which can be obtained only 
from a practical study of Harmony, Form, and other theoretical 
subjects. 

ENTRANCE CREDITS 

Candidates for the degrees in Music must present entrance credits 
equivalent to a four-year high school course and show evidence of 
aptitude in music. 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

Susquehanna University Conservatory of Music is approved by 
the State Department of Public Instruction for the education of 
supervisors and teachers in Public School Music. 



ORGANIZATIONS 

CONSERVATORY STUDENT ORGANIZATION 

All students taking work in the Conservatory of Music are mem- 
bers of the organization. Officers are elected from among the stu- 
dents, and preside at the meetings of the Recital Class as well as 
other student sessions. All matters pertaining to the welfare of the 
Conservatory of Music are considered through this organization. 

UNIVERSITY BANDS 

The marching band offers opportunity for the schooling of the 
individual marching bandsman in the routine of intricate maneuver 
and drill formation. 

In the concert band standard overtures, suites, and symphonic 
movements of the great masters are studied. Adequate technical 
facility, ability to read music readily, and a feeling for genuine in- 
terpretive skill are emphasized. College credit. 

96 



THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 97 

SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY ORCHESTRA 

Symphonic orchestral experience is gained in the study of stan- 
dard literature. Instruction is given in orchestral technique and 
methods of rehearsing. Adequate technical facility, ability to read 
music readily, and musicianship are necessary for entrance to this 
orchestra. College credit. 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY CHORUS 

This choral group of mixed voices meets two periods per week, 
being a required course for all sophomores and juniors in music. 
College students may elect the course if they desire.Choruses and 
cantatas are studied, and appearances are made in various recitals 
during the year. College credit. 



RULES AND REGULATIONS 

No reduction is made for absence during the first two weeks of 
the semester, nor for subsequent individual absences. 

All sheet music must be paid for when given out. 

Special holidays declared by the faculty will be observed. Les- 
sons missed because of such action will not be made up by any teacher 
without the consent of the director. 

Students must consult the director before arranging to take part 
in any public musical exercise outside of the regular work. Too 
often students bring unjust criticism on the teacher by appearing 
before an audience without having had sufficient preparation. 

Absence from class or private lessons requires that satisfactory 
excuses shall be offered. Failure in the matter lowers class standing. 

Reports showing attendance, scholarship, deportment, etc., are 
issued at the close of each semester. 

For further information concerning courses, tuition, etc., address 
— Director of the Conservatory of Music, Susquehanna University, 
Selinsgrove, Pa. 

RECITALS 

Students' Evening Recitals — Each semester, recitals are given 
in which students who have been prepared under the supervision of 
the instructors take part. These recitals furnish incentives to study 
and experience in public performance. 

Students' Recital Class — Students who are not sufficiently 
advanced to participate in the Evening Recitals are given experience 
in public performance in the Recital Classes which meet once each 



98 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

month. Rules governing stage deportment are brought to the atten- 
tion of the pupils, and topics of general interest to music students 
are discussed. These classes are not open to the public but an excep- 
tion is made in the case of near relatives. 

Artist Recitals — Important to the student of music is the hear- 
ing of compositions of the great masters as interpreted by artists of 
recognized ability. It is the purpose of the management to provide 
such recitals at the University at a nominal cost to the students, as 
well as to assist in making it possible to hear similar recitals in 
nearby cities. All students registered in the Conservatory of Music 
will be charged for this course, unless excused by the Director for 
good reasons. 

PRACTICE TEACHING 

The Senior Class in Music Education teaches and observes in the 
Public Schools of Sunbury, Selinsgrove, and Middleburg. This work 
is done under the direction of Mrs. Alice H. Giauque, B.S., A.M., 
Instructor in Methods, Susquehanna University; E. Edwin Sheldon, 
Mus.D., Director of the Conservatory of Music, Susquehanna Univer- 
sity; Katherine Reed, Mus.B., Supervisor of Music, Sunbury Public 
Schools; Mrs. June Hendricks Hoke, Supervisor of Music, Selins- 
grove Public Schools. 

COLLEGE CREDIT 

College students may elect any of the theoretical subjects and 
have them count as "college electives." 



THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 99 

EXPENSES 

For the best results in piano, singing, organ, violin, etc., in which 
individual instruction is given, students should take two periods of 
instruction each week. This is in accordance with the general prac- 
tice of conservatories of music. The university year is divided into 
two semesters of equal length. 

The total charge to boarding students for the year, including 
tuition, board, room rent, and all other fees ranges from $690.00 to 
$710.00 for men, and $690.00 to $730.00 for women. 

The total annual charge to day students, registered for the degree 
ranges from $375.00 up depending on the schedule taken. 

Two hours of daily practice on a piano are included in the above 
rates. Organ practice is an additional expense. Its cost is listed 
under miscellaneous expenses. 

The following tuition rates per semester are quoted for students 
not registered for a degree course. 

PIANO, SINGING, PIPE ORGAN, VIOLIN, etc. 

Freshman and Sophomore Years 

One semester — 2 one-half hour lessons per week $51.00 

One semester — 1 one-half hour lesson per week 25.50 

Junior and Senior Years 

One semester — 2 one-half hour lessons per week $68.00 

One semester — 1 one-half hour lesson per week 34.00 

Sub-Freshman Year 
PIANO, VIOLIN, CLARINET, TRUMPET, TROMBONE, etc. 

One semester — 2 one-half-hour lessons per week $25.50 

One semester — 1 one-half hour lesson per week 12.75 

MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES 

Rent of three-manual organ — one semester, 5 hours per week $25.00 
Rent of three-manual organ — one semester, 2 hours per week 10.00 
Rent of two-manual organ — one semester, 5 hours per week _ 20.00 
Rent of two-manual organ — one semester, 3 hours per week _ 12.00 

Rent of piano — one semester, 1 hour each day 5.00 

Rent of piano — each additional hour, one semester 2.00 

Private lessons in all theoretical subjects, each 1.00 

Sight Playing library fee — one semester 1.00 

Rent of any orchestral instrument, one semester 5.00 

Music theory subjects not taken for credit toward a degree shall be 
charged at the rate of $10.00 per semester hour. 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 




[ELOJT OF SCIENCE 

oloist Course 
Freshman Year 



/ 



First S&riiester 

Piano, Singing, Organ or 

Orchestral Instruments _ 1 

Second Solo Subject % 

Harmo/ry I 3 

History of Music I 3 

Sight Reading I 3 

Music Dictation I 3 

English 11 & Library Sci. _ 4 

Physical Education 2 

Personal Hygiene 1 



Hrs. Cr. 



Second Semester 

Hrs. Cr. 
Piano, Singing, Organ or 
Orchestral Instruments _ 1 

Second Solo Subject % 

Harmony II 3 

History of Music II 3 

Sight Reading II 3 

Music Dictation II 3 

English 12 3 

Physical Education 2 

Personal Hygiene 1 



20% 18 



19 % 18 



Sophomore Year 



Piano, Singing, Organ or 

Orchestral Instruments _ 1 

Second Solo Subject % 

Harmony III 2 

Sight Reading III 3 

Music Dictation III 3 

Eurythmics I 2 

English 21 (Survey) 3 

General Psychology 3 

Chorus 2 



Piano, Singing, Organ or 
Orchestral Instruments _ 1 

Second Solo Subject % 

Harmony IV (Keyboard) _ 2 
Elements of Conducting __ 2 

Music Interpretation 2 

Eurythmics II 2 

English 22 (Survey) 3 

Public Speaking 3 

Chorus 2 



19% 17 



17% 17 



Junior Year 



Piano, Singing, Organ or 

Orchestral Instruments _ 1 2 

Second Solo Subject % 1 

Harmony V (Form &Anal.) 2 2 

Adv. Instrum. Conducting _ 3 3 

An Elective 3 3 

French or German 3 3 

Sight Playing (Piano) 2 1 

Chorus 2 1 

Junior Recital Preparation _ 2 



Piano, Singing, Organ or 

Orchestral Instruments _ 1 2 

Second Solo Subject % 1 

Harmony VI (Composition) 2 2 

Adv. Choral Conducting __ 3 3 

Art Appreciation, 22 3 3 

French or German 3 3 

Sight Playing (Piano) ___ 2 1 

Chorus 2 1 

Junior Recital _ 3 



16% 18 



16% 19 



THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



101 



Senior 

Hrs. Cr. 
Piano, Singing, Organ or 

Orchestral Instruments _ 1 2 

Simple Counterpoint 2 2 

Sight Playing (Piano) 2 1 

French or German 3 3 

Bible I 2 2 

Music Appreciation (PSM) 2 1 

An Elective 3 3 

Senior Recital Preparation _ 3 

15 17 



Year 

Hrs. Cr. 
Piano, Singing, Organ or 

Orchestral Instruments _ 1 2 

Dbl. Counterpoint — Canon _ 3 3 

Sight Playing (Piano) ___ 2 1 

An Elective 3 3 

Bible II 2 2 

Music Appreciation (Gen.) 2 1 

Senior Recital 5 



13 17 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MUSIC EDUCATION 

This course has beeu approved by the State Council of Education 
for the preparation of Supervisors and Teachers of Public School 
Music. 



Freshman Year 



First Semester 



Hrs. Cr. 

Harmony I 3 3 

History of Music I 3 3 

Sight Reading I 3 2 

Music Dictation I 3 2 

English 11 & Library Sc. __ 4 3 

Physical Education I 2 1 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, 
Chorus, Band, and Or- 
chestral Instruments 9 3 



Second Semester 



Hrs. Cr. 

Harmony II 3 3 

History of Music II 3 3 

Sight Reading II 3 2 

Music Dictation II 3 2 

English 12 3 3^ 

Physical Education II 2 1 * 

Personal Hygiene 1 1* 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, 
Chorus, Band, and Or- 
chestral Instruments 9 3 



28 18 



27 18 



Sophomore Year 



Harmony III 2 2 

Sight Reading III 3 2 

Music Dictation III _ x _ 3 2 

Eurythmics I 2 1 

General Psychology 3 3 

-History of Civilization 3 3 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, 
Chorus, Band, and Or- 
chestral Instruments 9 3 



Harmony IV (Keyboard) _ 2 2 

Methods and Materials I __ 4 3 

Elements of Conducting 2 2 

Eurythmics II 2 1 

Public Speaking 3 3 

Survey of English Litera- 
ture (English 22) 3 3 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, 
Chorus, Band, and Or- 
chestral Instruments 9 3 



25 16 



25 17 



102 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 



Junior 

Hrs. Cr. 
Harmony V (Form) 2 



Methods and Materials II 4 
Instrumental Conducting _ 3 

Principles of Sociology 3 

Introduction to Education 3 
Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, 
Chorus, Band, and Or- 
chestral Instruments 9 



Year 

Hra. 
Harmony VI (Composition) 2 
Methods and Materials III _ 4 

Adv. Choral Conducting 3 

Appreciation of Art 22 3 

Educational Psychology 3 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, 
Chorus, Band, and Or- 
chestral Instruments 6 




24 17 



lusic Appreciation (PSM) 2 
> Bible I 2 

s Science Survey 3 

Student Teaching and Con- 
ference 8 

v/Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, 
Chorus, Band, and Or- 

r - chestral Instruments 6 

^/History (American) 3 

24 



Senior Year 

1 Music Appreciation (Gen.) 2 
2.X Bible II 2 

3**^ Educational Measurements 2 
v Student Teaching and Con- 

§/ ference 7 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, 
Chorus, Band, and Or- 

2 chestral Instruments 6 

3X* An Elective 3 

17 22 



Cr. 

2 
3 

! 



21 16 



2 



3 



16 



S 



INSTRUMENTAL COURSES 



Elementary Class Instruction in Band and Orchestral Instruments 

Students are taught the principles underlying the playing of band 
and orchestral instruments. Problems of class procedure in the pub- 
lic schools are discussed. Ensemble playing is a part of the work 
done. 

String Group — Two hours per week through two semesters. 

Woodwind Group — Two hours per week for two semesters. 

Brass Group — Two hours per week through two semesters. 

Percussion — One hour per week. One semester. 

Advanced Class Instruction in Band and Orchestral Instruments 

Further study may be pursued in Band and Orchestral Instru- 
ments as follows : 

String Choir (Viola, Violoncello, and Bass Viol) 
Woodwind Choir (Flute, Oboe, and Bassoon) 






THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 103 

Brass Choir (All brass instruments not studied in the elemen- 
tary classes.) 

Junior Band — One hour per week. 

Junior Orchestra — One hour per week. 

Students of the elementary and advanced instrumental classes are 
given an opportunity to play instruments in the Junior Band and 
the Junior Orchestra, an experience of great value. 

Orchestration and Orchestra and Band Technique will be 
offered as electives when sufficient demand is made for such courses. 
Smaller Ensembles 

String Trio 

String Quartet 

String Quintet 

Violin Choir 

Brass Ensemble 

Woodwind Ensemble 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

Professor Sheldon (Director), Professor Linebaugh, Professor 

Hatz, Mrs. Giauque, Mrs. Sheldon, Mrs. Hatz, Miss 

Miss Potteiger, Mr. Haskins 

11 Harmony I 

A study of first essentials in music ; scales, intervals, note and rest 
values, musical terms, etc., thereby laying a foundation for further 
harmonic writing and musical development. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mrs. Hatz 



12 Harmony II 

The supertonic, submediant, and mediant harmonies, with their 
sevenths and their inversions as well as simple chromatic alterations 
are studied. Melody writing and melodic invention using these 
simpler harmonies are a part of this semester's work. 

Three hours. Three credits. Mrs. Hatz 



13 Sight Reading I 

Students read at sight music of moderate difficulty, using the 
sol-fa syllables as well as words. Tone and rhythm are stressed. 
Three hours. Two credits. Miss Potteiger 



104 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

14 Sight Reading II 

The work of the first semester is continued introducing chromatics 
and more difficult intervals and rhythms. Two and three-part songs 
with words add to the interest of this course. 

Three hours. Two credits. Miss Potteiger 

15 Dictation I 

A study of tone and rhythm enabling the student to sing and write 
melodic phrases which have first been visualized. 
Three hours. Two credits. Mr. Linebaugh 

16 Dictation II 

Melodic dictation is continued throughout this semester, stressing 
the development of memory in writing longer phrases with melodic 
and rhythmic accuracy. 

Three hours. Two credits. Mr. Linebaugh 

17 History of Music I 

The development of music from its beginnings to the period of the 
classical composers is covered in this semester. Current events are 
brought to the attention of the class each week and students are 
encouraged to do such reading in the library. 

Three hours. Three credits. Mrs. Sheldon 

18 History of Music II 

Music and musicians from the classical period to the present, to- 
gether with current events, are given serious consideration. 

Three hours. Three credits. Mrs. Sheldon 

19 Eurythmics I 

This course aims to enrich and develop the individual's musical 
ability by stimulating his bodily responses. The student learns to 
interpret meter, rhythm, and phrasing not as a mathematical prob- 
lem but as movement. 

Two hours. One credit. 

20 Eurythmics II 

Built upon the foundation of Eurythmics I, this course demands 
greater skill, concentration, and a vivid imagination in order to 
creatively express and interpret the more complicated rhythms. Em- 
phasis is placed upon the development of balance, relaxation, grace, 
and poise. 
Two hours. One credit. 






THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 105 

21 Harmony III 

The study of chromatic harmony and chord species is included in 
Harmony III. This material is applied in various types of modu- 
lation. Original melody writing and modulation using the material 
are a part of the course. 

Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Hatz 

22 Harmony IV 

Knowledge of diatonic harmonies, non-chordal tones, easy chro- 
matic chords, and modulation, are applied to the keyboard. Included 
in the course are transposition, sequences, and creative work at the 
keyboard. 

Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Hatz 

23 Sight Reading III 

This course presupposes that the student has satisfactorily com- 
pleted Courses I and II. New material is constantly used, and speed 
and accuracy in reading from the G and F clefs are required. 

Three hours. Two credits. Miss Potteiger 

24 Methods and Materials I 

The work covered in the course includes music materials suitable 
for the elementary grades, textbooks, songs, and classroom music 
procedure. One hour per week will be devoted to "applied methods," 
including observation and preliminary practice teaching in the 
schools. 

Four hours. Three credits. Mrs. Giauque 

25 Dictation III 

Harmonic dictation is designed to develop ability to recognize and 
write chord progressions, making use of the various harmonies as 
they are required. 

Three hours. Two credits. Mr. Linebaugh 



26 Elements of Conducting 

Principles of conducting; study of methods of conductors; daily 
practice in adapting these methods to school purposes; score reading 
and program making are points receiving attention. Orchestral and 
choral conducting are a part of the student's experience. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Hatz 



106 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

27-28 Chorus Class 

A study of music applicable to high school groups, amateur 
choruses, and choirs. An acquaintance with choral music from Bach 
to the present. Discussion of choral music, voice testing, and ways of 
judging compositions. This course is open to college students. It is 
required of sophomores and juniors in the Music Education Course. 

Mrs. Giauque 

29 Methods and Materials II 

The work covered in the course includes music materials suitable 
for the intermediate grades, textbooks, songs, and classroom music 
procedure. One hour per week will be devoted to "applied methods," 
including observation and preliminary practice teaching in the 
schools. 
Four hours. Three credits. MRS. Giauque 

30 Methods and Materials III 

A study of music courses for junior and senior high schools. 
Among the problems considered are classification of voices, methods 
of dealing with the adolescent voice, assembly, music clubs, bands 
and orchestras, and routine work pertaining to these departments. 
Four hours. Three credits. Mrs. Giauque 

31 Harmony V 

This course includes a study of the motive, the phrase, period 
forms, two and three-part song forms, rondo forms, sonata form, etc. 
Detailed analysis is presented in connection with each lesson. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Sheldon 

32 Harmony VI 

Included in this course is creative application of material of all 
previous harmony courses. Composition in various vocal and instru- 
mental forms is presented and the best work is given performance 
before the music students. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Sheldon 

33 Advanced Instrumental Conducting 

Consideration of the methods and principles of conducting applied 
to the orchestra and band. Development of baton technique, score 
reading, orchestral playing and the psychology of rehearsing 
ensembles of various sizes and combinations. Orchestral literature 
adaptive to public school work is studied in this course. Opportunity 
is given the student to conduct compositions of different character. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Hatz 



THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 107 

34 Advanced Choral Conducting 

A more detailed study of the principles of conducting applied to 
choral groups. A discussion of points helpful in the organization 
and direction of church choirs, mixed choruses, a cappella choirs, and 
larger groups producing oratorios. The young conductor is given 
opportunity to appear before groups, acquiring power through such 
experience in this particular field, enabling him to be at ease when 
called on to serve in the capacity of a choral conductor. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Haskins 

35-36 Piano Sight Playing 

Students of the Junior Year who elect to major in Piano or 
Organ are given two periods each week in ensemble playing. Music 
of average difficulty is placed before them for sight reading. 
Two hours throughout the year. Two credits. Mr. Linebaugh 

37 Simple Counterpoint 

Melody against melody is written throughout the five species, be- 
ginning with two-part and continuing up to eight voices. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Linebaugh 

38 Double Counterpoint and Canon 

Counterpoint so written that it may be removed an octave, tenth, 
or twelfth above or below the cantus firmus. Canons (direct imita- 
tion) are written in all intervals and prepare the student for the more 
advanced contrapuntal work in instrumental and vocal fugue. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Sheldon 

39 Instrumental and Vocal Fugue 

Contrapuntal writing reaches its culmination in the Fugue. Two, 
three, four and five voiced fugues are written by the student. Analy- 
sis of fugues by Johann Sebastian Bach is included in this course. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Sheldon 

41 Music Appreciation I (P.S.M.) 

Methods — An outline course of study on procedure and appli- 
cable materials for the Elementary, Intermediate, and Junior High 
School. 
Two hours. One credit. MRS. GlAUQUE 

42 Music Appreciation II (General) 

The development of a critical judgment of music through an 
appreciation of various forms and modes, through recordings and 
renditions by faculty and visiting artists. General appreciation is 
particularly suitable for college students. 
Two hours. One credit. MRS. GlAUQUE 



108 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

43-44 Piano Sight Playing 

Students of the senior class who elect to major in piano or organ 
are given two periods per week in ensemble playing similar to that 
in the Junior year, but with music of greater difficulty. 

Two hours throughout the year. Two credits. Mr. Lineb\ugh 

45-46 Student Teaching and Conference 

The seniors in Music Education observe and do teaching in the 
public schools of Selinsgrove and Sunbury under the supervision of 
their methods instructor and members of the faculty mentioned under 
Practice Teaching. In addition to the student teaching they have 
critic classes and special conferences. 

Mrs. Giauque 

47 Orchestration 

This course is devoted to arranging music for the orchestra and 
implies an intimate knowledge of the range, qualities, and varied 
capabilites of all orchestral instruments. Attention is given to 
scoring accompaniments for high school choral literature. 

Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Hatz 

48 Orchestra and Band Technique 

Instrumental Teaching Techniques are outlined and these demon- 
strated with groups. Instrumental organization and administration 
including the study of curriculum for instrumental teachers, and 
consideration of the problems of the band and orchestra director are 
herein set forth. 

Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Hatz 

50 Instrumental Technique Class 

A laboratory class designed to give the student opportunity to 
inquire into, discuss, and experiment with the problems and tech- 
niques of teaching and performing which confront the music educa- 
tor on the flute, oboe, bassoon, and percussion. 
One hour. Mrs. Hatz 

52 Educational Measurements 

The measurement of specific capacities or abilities involved in 
the hearing, appreciation and performance of music, based on a 
scientific analysis of elements which function in all music. The 
techniques of administering aptitude tests for the discovering and 
developing of music interest are practised and applied. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Sheldon 



THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 109 

54 Music Interpretation 

An analysis of the subject of Interpretation as it pertains to a 
singer's repertory and the artist's playing of compositions on musical 
instruments. A discussion of the composer, the artist, and the audi- 
ence in their right relationship to the composition. Recorded music 
used in the classroom. 

Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Sheldon 



PIANOFORTE 

Sub-freshmen — First, Second and Third Grades — The New 
England Conservatory Graded Course for Piano, Books I, II, III 
and Pieces of corresponding difficulty. 

Freshman Year — Scales in parallel and contrary motion mem- 
orized and played. Arpeggios built on the three triad positions. 
Technique, touch, and phrasing. Etudes: Duvernoy, Op. 120; 
Czerny, Op. 636 ; Loeschhorn, Op. 52 ; Kohler, Op. 242. Sonatinas 
— Clementi, Op. 36 ; Gurlitt, Op. 54 — The Clavecin Book of Anna M. 
Bach. Pieces of corresponding difficulty. 

Sophomore Year — Scales in Thirds and Sixths memorized and 
played. Arpeggios built on the Diminished Seventh Chord. Technic, 
touch, phrasing, and memorizing. Etudes — Loeschhorn, Op. 66; 
Czerny, Op. 299. Schirmer Sonata Album, Vol. 239. (Haydn, 
Mozart, Beethoven.) J. S. Bach-Busoni — Two-part Inventions. 
Pieces of corresponding difficulty. 

Junior Year — Scales in Accents ; scales with two and three notes 
against one and two. Arpeggios built on the Dominant Seventh 
Chord. Technique touch, phrasing, memorizing, interpretation, and 
ensemble playing. Etudes— Cramer's Fifty Selected Studies ; Czerny, 
Op. 740 with metronome. Sonatas — Beethoven. J. S. Bach-Faelton 
— Three-part Studies. Pieces of corresponding difficulty. 

Junior Recital 

Senior Year — Technique, touch, phrasing, memorizing, interpre- 
tation, and ensemble playing. Etudes — dementi's Gradus ad Par- 
nassum, Chopin's Studies. Sonatas and Concertos by Beethoven, 
Schumann, Mendelssohn, etc. J. S. Bach — Preludes and Fugues. 
Pieces of corresponding difficulty. 

Senior Recital 



110 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

SINGING 

Introduction — To major in singing, the applicant must possess 
certain qualities and talents requisite to the accomplishments of a 
singer, including a healthy throat. 

Freshman Year — A study of the vocal instrument. Respiration 
and exercises for developing lung capacity. Correct posture and 
plastic exercises for developing freedom of bodily motion. Yowel 
sounds and consonants in definite form. Articulating organs. Hum- 
ming. Vocal Hygiene. Songs in medium compass of voice. Con- 
centration. Memory. Vocal technique based on the major scale. 
Sieber Vocalises. 

Sophomore Year — Routine drill on vocal technique. Major and 
minor scales. Italian diction. Vaccai Studies. Concentration. Song 

literature. Songs Schubert, Brahms, Mozart, Wolf, Handel, and 

Gluck. 

Junior Year — Routine drill on vocal technique. Chromatic 
scale. Phrasing. Embellishments. Panofka vocalises. Vocal style. 
Memory. Concentration, Interpretation. Mimicry. Poise. Songs 
in Italian, French, or German. Songs in English and Latin. 

Junior Recital 

Senior Year — Daily Vocal Drill. Advanced technique. A study 
of the Trill and Messa di Voce. Bordogni vocalises. Mimicry. Song 
literature — classic and modern. Oratorio. Opera. 

Senior Recital 



PIPE ORGAN 

The object of this department is to prepare practical organists for 
the church service as well as concert playing. 

To be admitted to this course the student must have attained a 
reasonable piano technique and fluency. 

Two lessons per week are required for the Sophomore, Junior, and 
Senior years. 

Freshman Year — General outline of the construction of the 
organ. "The Organ" by Stainer. Pedal Studies. Easy Trios by 
Schneider, and other organ composers. Playing of hymns. Easy 
organ pieces. 

Sophomore Year — Dudley Buck's 18 Studies in Pedal Phrasing. 
Organ Trios of moderate difficulty. Little Preludes and Fugues by 
J. S. Bach. A study of organ registration, and playing of hymns 
and easier anthems. Organ pieces of moderate difficulty. 






THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 111 

Junior Year — Technique, interpretation, registration. Truette — 
34 Pedal Studies from J. S. Bach's works. The easier movements 
from Sonatas for Organ by Mendelssohn, Guilmant, etc. Preludes 
and Fugues of moderate difficulty by J. S. Bach and Mendelssohn. 
Advanced anthems and service playing. Pieces of corresponding 
difficulty. 

Junior Recital 

Senior Year — Preludes, Toccatas and Fugues by Bach, Guil- 
mant and others. Sonatas and advanced concert pieces by Rhein- 
berger, Widor, Dethier, etc. 

Senior Recital 

VIOLIN 

Sub-freshman Year — S c a 1 e s and Technics — Blumenstengle 
Scales, Bk. 1. Methods — Bang, Pts. 1, and 2, or Hohmann, Bks. 1, 
and 2. Studies— Wohlfahrt, Op. 45, Bk. 1. Kayser, Op. 20, Bk. 1. 
Pieces — 1st position 

Freshman Year — Scales and Technics — Blumenstengle Scales, 
Bk. 2. Sevcik School of Bowing, Pt. 1 Studies— Wohlfahrt, Op. 
45, Bk. 2. Kayser, Op. 20, Bk. 2. Wohlfahrt, Op. 74, Bk. 2. 
Pieces — 1st and 3rd positions. 

Sophomore Year — Scales and Technics — Schradieck Scales. 
Sevcik, Op. 1, Bk. 3. Sevcik School of Bowing, Pts. 1 and 2. Studies 
—Kayser Op. 20, Bk. 3. Mazas, Op. 36, Bk. 1. Sitt, Op. 22, Bk. 3 
or Kayser, Op. 57. 
Solos — 1st and 5th positions. 

Junior Year — Scales and Technics — Schradieck Scales. Schra- 
dieck School of Violin Technics, Pt. 1. Sevcik, Op. 8 and 9. Studies 
—Mazas, Op. 36, Bk. 2. Dont, Op. 37. David, The Advanced Stu- 
dent, Pt. 2. Sonatas and Concertos by Viotti, Mardini, Bach, and 
Mozart. 

Junior Recital 

Senior Year — Scales and Technics — Schradieck Scales. Casorti 
Op. 50. Dancla, Op. 74. School of Velocity. Studies. Florillo, 36 
Caprices. Kreutzer, 42 Studies. Rode, 24 Caprices. Sonatas and 
Concertos by Mendelssohn, Bruch, Wieniawski, and Viotti. 

Senior Recital 

THE SECOND "SOLO SUBJECT" 

Candidates for graduation in piano shall have taken at least two 
years in voice, violin, or organ. For graduation in voice, violin, or 
organ, the student shall have completed the Sophomore requirements 
in piano. 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



The first Alumni Association at Susquehanna University was 
organized June 4, 1884. The Association now embraces 2,700 alumni 
and former students; 35% are teachers, 12% ministers, 8% business 
men, 3% physicians, 3% lawyers; and all of the leading professions 
are represented. Susquehanna alumni are located in thirty-six states 
and many foreign countries. There are eighteen district alumni 
clubs active in Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Dis- 
trict of Columbia, Maryland, and California. There are also eight 
state and sectional districts comprising all of the United States. 

The Susquehanna University Alumni Association is governed by 
the Association officers and Alumni Council. The Association pub- 
lishes a fine Alumni Quarterly, sponsors an annual Alumni Fund, and 
organizes alumni affairs in the districts and on the campus. 

Alumni Officers 

Honorary President, Dr. John I. "Woodruff, '88 Selinsgrove 

President, William A. Janson, '20 York 

First Vice-President, Addison E. Pohle, '27 Altoona 

Second Vice President, Harry M. Rice, '26 Bloomficld, N. J. 

Recording Secretary, Samuel R. Frost, '26 Selinsgrove 

Treasurer, Dr. George E. Fisher, '88 Selinsgrove 

Statistician, Edwin M. Brungart, '00 Selinsgrove 

Alumni Council Executive Committee 

William A. Janson, Chairman, '20 York 

George E. Fisher, '88 Selinsgrove 

Mary A. Phillips, '10 Selinsgrove 

W. Latimer Landes, '11 York 

Samuel R. Frost, '26 Selinsgrove 

Addison E. Pohle, '27 Altoona 

Alumni Fund Committee 

William A. Janson, Chairman, '20 York 

George E. Fisher, Treasurer, '88 Selinsgrove 

President G. Morris Smith Selinsgrove 

Marion 8. Schoch, '06 Selinsgrove 

112 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 113 

Samuel R. Frost, '26 Selinsgrove 

A. M. Stamets, '19 Harrisburg 

Dan Smith, Jr., '97 Williamsport 

Grace Geiselman, '09 Hanover 

Edith Frankenfield, '34 Philadelphia 

Reed Speer, '32 Pittsburgh 

H. Vernon Blough, '31 Arendtsville 



LADIES' AUXILIARY OF SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

On February 4, 1922, a group of ladies directly interested in the 
growth of Susquehanna University met in Seibert Hall and effected 
an organization known as the Ladies Auxiliary of Susquehanna 
University. 

The aim of the Auxiliary is to promote the interests of Susque- 
hanna University both spiritually and financially, and to support 
such undertakings as shall be authorized by the general body. 

Six sub-auxiliaries have been formed. Mount Carmel, April 10, 
1937, Lewistown, April 26, 1937, Johnstown, May 1, 1938, Williams- 
port, October 17, 1940, Hazleton, October 22, 1940, and Harrisburg, 
February 25, 1941. 

It is hoped that through the activities of these auxiliaries, aid may 
be given in more extensive advertising, in the improvement of condi- 
tions in the buildings and on the campus, and in general work for a 
greater Susquehanna. 



DEGREES CONFERRED AND 
LIST OF STUDENTS 

DEGREES CONFERRED IN 1945 

HONORARY DEGREES 

Doctor of Science 

George Gose Peery Salem, Va. 

Master of Business Administration 
Benjamin Apple Sunbury 

Doctor of Letters 
Frederic Brush White Plains, N". Y. 

DEGREES IN COURSE 
Bachelor of Arts 

Mary Elizabeth Basehoar Littlestown 

Frances Madalon Bittinger _-.../ Selin=grove 

Ruth Graybill Botdorf <1 Harrisburg 

Jean Cornwell Geiger £ Williamsport 

^John Joseph Kocsis S__~r_T South River, N. J. 

LaVerne Jane Kohn j__. Merchantville, 1ST. J. 

**Celo Vincent Leitzel __-_Qj4rJ_f_ Richfield 

Mary Elizabeth Mover __ .11 Middleburg 

'—"flarold Ray Snyder Selinsgrove 

Patricia Eleanor Snyder 111 Sunbury 

Almon Franklin "Wolfe Pottstown 

Bachelor of Science 

"William Anstead Hays Johnstown 

Corinno Lillian Kahn Bloomfiobl. \. J. 

Marian Arlene "Willard __11 Coatesville 

Bachelor of Science in Music Education 

Miriam Louise Garth "Williamsport 

Natalie Louise Kre>ge Ocean Grove, X. J. 

114 



LIST OF STUDENTS 115 

Howard Reese Payne Taylor 

Robert Wilbur Surplus . Gouldsboro 

Margaret Elizabeth "Walter Milton 

John Daniel Warner Schuylkill Haven 



Prize Awards for 1945 

The Charles E. Covert Memorial Prize 

Rine Graybill Winey Selinsgrove 

The Stine Mathematical Prize 
Adah Arlene Wolfe Mill Hall 

The Sigma Alpha Iota National Fraternity Music Prize 
Margaret Elizabeth Walter Milton 

Omega Delta Sigma Sorority Scholarship Prize 
Corinne Lillian Kahn Bloomfield, N". J. 

Kappa Delta Phi Sorority Scholarship Prize 
LaVerne Jane Kohn Merchantville, ~N. J. 



Senior Class 1945-46 

Barton, Marjorie Williamsport 

Beckwith, Carmen Marie Oakmont 

Botdorf, Emily Lou Harrisburg 

Clark, James Robert ._ Harrisburg 

Cochrane, Ruth Findlay Bloomfield, N. J. 

Gasparoli, Gloria Elvira Marlboro, N. Y. 

Gelnett, Arthur Junior Selinsgrove 

Hazen, Norma Jane Sunbury 

Herr, Betty Jane Hazleton 

Hoffman, June Louisa Hazleton 

Johns, Roswell James Honesdale 

Klick, Marie Agnes Wind Gap 

Lehman, Selena Helen Sunbury 

Malkames, Jane Rowe Hazleton 

Miller, Anna Catherine Sunbury 

Rohrbach, Janet Louise Sunbury 



U6 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Smith, Charlotte Morrisville 

Spicer, Hope Beatrice New Providence, N. J. 

Stapleton, Marjorie Joan Williamsport 

Sternat, Dorothy Louise Biglerville 

Strausser, Jean Louise Mt. Carmel 

Swiencki, Bernard Stanley Glen Lyon 

Wheat, Jean Nancy Cedar Grove, N. J. 

Winey, Rine Graybill Selinsgrove 



Junior Class 

Braveman, Jacqueline New York, N. Y. 

Clark, Gayle Virginia Drexel Hill 

Cryder, Leah Marguerite Woolrich 

Day, Naomi Elizabeth Red Lion 

Eby, Helen Ann Newport 

Garman, Lenore Kathleen Selinsgrove 

Gross, William David Selinsgrove 

Gundrum, Sara Jane Rockwood 

Huver, Jean Louise Allentown 

Johns, Margaret Helen Honesdale 

Kelly, Ella Jean Goshen, N. Y. 

Kemp, Edith Sunbury 

Lepley, Helen Virginia Winfield 

Lizzio, Mary Ann Conemaugh 

Miller, Elizabeth Anne Williamsport 

Myers, Nancy Elizabeth Elizabethtown 

Peyton, Joseph Paul, Jr. Red Bank, N. J. 

Rothenberg, William B. Sunbury 

Schlick, Louise Helen Kingston 

Talbot, Marie May Reading 

Taylor, Joseph Wildwood, N. J. 

Thompson, Elise Claire Lynbrook, N. Y. 

Troutman, Martha Jayne Elizabethville 

Wagner, Dorothy Aldan 

'Weller, Lawrence Aristes 

Williams, Ruth Elizabeth Bloomfield, N. J. 

Wolfe, Adah Arlene Mill Hall 



Sophomore Class 

Apple, Joan Sunbury 

Arseniu, Frosta Mary Lewistown 

Arthur, Cora Mae Hughesville 

Bathgate, Bessie Margaret State College 

Bilger, Aria Mae Kreamer 

Bomboy, David Edward Bloomsburg 

Boyer, Ronald Herbert Pillow 

Campo, Angela Victoria 1_ New York, N. Y. 

Dankman, Herbert Stephen Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Dauberman, Lois Christine Nemacolin 

Doss, Virginia Audrey Cranford, N. J. 

Ebert, Dawn June Shamokin Dam 

Eilhardt, Edith Dorothy Clarks Summit 



LIST OF STUDENTS 117 

■E p s t e in y-Myra-tfenre" : Lyndhurst, N. J. 

Frank, Betty Great Neck, N. Y. 

Gaetz, Roberta Moser Mt. Carmel 

Garard, Martha Evelyn Lewisburg 

-G ar - ma n,- Naomi Elaine Richfield 

Gibson, Ann Elizabeth Lewistown 

Glanzberg, Alvin Brooklyn, N. Y. 

-GehVMary Elizabeth Williamsport 

Gould, Harriet Ann Johnstown 

Graybill, Caroline Mae McAlisterville 

-ffackerr®TD" Elene Benton 

Harbeson, Carolyn Hope Milroy 

Heithoff, Adele Anne New York, N. Y. 

Herman, Carl Lindbergh Winfield 

Kain, Barbara Anne Harrisburg 

Klemons, S. Rhoda Forest Hills, N. Y. 

Koons, Bernadine Marie Mt. Carmel 

Kramer, Jeannette Sunbury 

Laks, Ruth Elaine Kingston 

Leisenring, Frances Marie Bear Gap 

MacNamara, Harriet Julia Sunbury 

McConnell, Edith Perkasie 

Malkames, Ann Ross Hazleton 

Markey, Hilda Mabel York 

Marks, Caroline Estelle Danville 

Mengel, Marjorie Elizabeth Freeburg 

Minier, Margaret Millersburg 

Mitchell, Charles Gray Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Moore, Jerry Donald Sunbury 

Mould, Raymond DeFour Bronxville, N. Y. 

Narayan, Ongkar British Guiana 

Peters, Helen Hope Reedsville 

Polanchyck, Nedia Frackville 

-Ramer, Betty Deloris _^ York 

Reichley, Gloria Irene Dover 

Reisch, Elizabeth Katz Ashland 

Roberts, Gertrude A. Monmouth, N. J. 

Sharwarko, Martha Dorothy Hazleton 

Sheetz, Anna Maria Nazareth 

Shook, Velma Grace Pen Argyl 

Smith, Betty Louise Woodsboro, Md. 

Smith, Sara Lee Scranton 

Steele, Eleanor Elizabeth Harrisburg 

Stout, Marie Eleanor Monmouth, N. J. 

Strouse, Florence Elizabeth Proctor 

Wagoner, Gaynelle Pylesville, Md. 

Walker, Virginia Marie Beavertown 

Walmer, Gloria Jane Harrisburg 

Weikel, Dexter Neil Espy 

Welliver, Harry William Beaver Meadows 

Wentzel, Jean Elizabeth Berwick 

Wood, Mary Ellen Farmingdale, N. Y. 



/ c 






^ 



118 I-, -:, SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 






I 

earl _ 



Feeshman Class 



-Adams, Donald Lervef MifBinburg 

Alleman, Geraldine Pearl _> ^ Abbottstown 

Avery, Miriam Jane JL Kingston 

lfYW\Bailey, Rosaline Mae -*V- -, Selinsgrove 

p-___«— Beck, Walter Clifford vf-.^. Irvington, N. J. 

C^ '■P ^ Beckwith, Richard Arthur^ti Oakmont 

fBergstresser, Rachel Snyder Selinsgrove 

Billow, Grace Ellen ..-. McAlisterville 

Bingaman, Paul Reariclr- Thompsontown 

Birtley, Alice Louise >Ci Clarks Green 

-"|T" Birtley, Audrey Louise _^ Bloomsburg 

"["Black, Constance Lou>?_ Millerstown 

Bortz, Irene Louise vC Philadelphia 

Bottorff, Joyce Elaine Lewistown 

i Bousom, Dorothy Carolyn Glenolden 

Briand, Lorraine Virginia Great Neck, N. Y. 

Brindel, Anna Margaret Lewistown 

Buffington, Ruth Mary Valley View 

Childress, Barbara Ellen --J York 

4y Cochrane, Virginia Wayne\^__ Bloomfield, N. J. 

Crissinger, Lena Florence r Rebuck 

Crowell, Frances KathryivjjBL 7 Northumberland 

Culp, Harry Conrad _/_ Sunbury 

""J" Dale, Mary Louise ^A Renovo 

Dall Vechia, Joseph Anfenonj^ Marlboro, N. Y. 

Decker, Doris Arlene \#1 J^L^->^ Millheim 

Derr, Aloysius Vincent Ashland 

Derr, Jean Eleanor Selinsgrove 

Dietz, Stanford John Harrisburg 

Espenshade, Mary Ruth Ephrata 

Etzrodt, Edna Mae Scranton 

Everett, Nancy Ann \£-/ Bayside, N. Y. 

Fischer, Janet Virginia^/. York 

p-Fleisher, Olive Virginia/^ Harrisburg 

Fosselman, Donald W. Millerstown 

Fry, Patricia Cornell — y Montclair, N. J. 

Gardner, Dorothy Eleanor Allentown 

Getsinger, Mary Ann yl Wildwood, N. J. 

Gray, Norman Louisvl, Highland Park, N. J. 

Gring, Jacqueline Fay\£ New Bloomfield 

■ Guss, Karl Edward -£ Mifflintown 

Haddon, John Cameron _„' Northumberland 

Heller, Marion Elizabeth Bloomsburg 

Herman, Marjorie AnnX Beaver Springs 

Jones, Maude Bessiej Shamokin 

^. Kaley, Alice Marie^S Williamsport 

Keller, JanetLouise Windber 

Keller, Juanita Belle Jefferson, Md. 

Kelton, Jean Constance Richmond Hill, N. Y. 

Kepner, Lillian Mae Baltimore, Md. 

Kilhefner, Geraldine Rose Ephrata 

Kiss, Isabel Marlboro, N. Y. 

KJinger, Ruth Elizabeth Sugarloaf 




LIST OF STUDENTS 119 



Kreps, Julia Arlene Lewistown 

Kretsinger, Louise Elizabeth Washington, D. C. 

Lady, Charles Luther /. Biglerville 

-Lau, Grace Elizabeth/- 7 Spring Grove 

,. Lee, Verdella MayyS. j- Clarks Summit 

Lehman, Curtis Paul » _/____,. Sunbury 

Lundahl, Martha Marie V Newville 

Lybarger, Nina Frances West Lampeter 

McHenry, Marjorie Ann A Stillwater 

Matthews, Jean Elizabeth*! Middletown, N. Y. 

Mattson, Dolores Mae^_ Coatesville 

Myers, Winifred Jana/-_ Muncy Valley 

Nitchman, Dorothy Mae York 

Phillips, Muriel Alkali A Old Greenwich, Conn. 

Reitz, Faye Mary *tl__^^_ Leek Kill 

^ Richard, Madeleine ReAd^.— r Staten Island, N. Y. 

^Riordan, Agnes Mae i€__l f ll-_i New York, N. Y. 

-Rishell, Esther Ann Renovo 

Robson, Marion Cornell 7 Marlboro, N. Y. 

Rush, Lucretia Elizabeth^ Cranford, N. J. 

Savidge, Frances A. -^/. Shamokin 

Schadt, Susan Harriett Lake Ariel 

Schreiner, Carol Kathleen Williamstown 

Schweighofer, Rita Fsl^ZJ. Honesdale 

Scott, Lorraine Ella ---/— Mt. Carmel 

Secrist, Wayne LeRoy-\/- ^. Millerstown 

Shaffer, Dorothy Isabel -^^^___ Sunbury 

Shannon, Mary Elizabeth Millheim 

Sharrow, Janet Louise i Muncy 

L Shroyer, Shirley Irene Sunbury 

Slicer, Sally E. Meyersdale 

'" Smith, Barbara Frances Sunbury 

Smith, Mary Helen Sunbury 

Southwick, Margaret Jane Millburn, N. J. 

E Speyer, Gabrielle Pamela New York, N. Y. 

Spire, Anne Marie Freeland 

Steigerwalt, Marian Constance Schuylkill Haven 

Sterrett, J. David i Ridley Park 

Strawbridge, Irma Rosanna Jl Lemoyne 

Swartz, Phyllis Irene Jl Lewistown 

Wagenseller, Pearl Florence-/ Selinsgrove 

Wanbaugh, Doris Elaine York 

Wiest, Carley Lorraine Pillow 

Williams, Sarah Elaine Bloomfield, N. J. 

Williams, Margaret Harriet Mt. Carmel 

Williams, Russell Henry _/ Sunbury 

Williard, Joseph R. +JL Lewistown 

Wolfe, Fancher Elbert _ v _ Kingston 

Wolfe, Vivian Catherine . Williamstown 

Wright, Anne B. Hazleton 

1 Yancho, William Phillip Morris Plains, N. J. 

^ Yarnell, Shirley June Lewistown 

Young, Lois Jane Lewistown 



120 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Special Students 

Cook, Fern M. (Mrs.) Selinsgrove 

Felton, Helen Grace Elizabeth, N. J. 

Fetterolf, George Pharus Sunbury 

Peterson, John Robert Port Trevorton 



Summer Session 1945 

Unless otherwise noted, these students attended both terms of the 
Summer Session. 

Apple, Joan* Sunbury 

Boyer, Ronald Herbert Pillow 

Brandt, Ethel Irene Mechanicsburg 

Cox, Mary Christine** Newport 

Craft, Martha Sechrist* Port Trevorton 

Crouse, Margaret I.* Berwick 

Cryder, Leah M.* Woolrich 

Dankman, Herbert Stephen Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Dietz, Stanford John Harrisburg 

Doig, Richard Rolland Honesdale 

Dotson, Ruth Garman Mt. Pleasant Mills 

Felton, Helen Grace Elizabeth, N. J. 

Garth, Miriam Louise* Williamsport 

Gass, Romane Adda* Sipesville 

Geiger, Jean Cornwell Williamsport 

Gelnett, Arthur Junior Selinsgrove 

Gibson, Ann Elizabeth Lewistown 

Glanzberg, Alvin Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Gohl, Mary Elizabeth Williamsport 

Hane, Anita Moyer* Selinsgrove 

Harer, Sherry Peard Williamsport 

Hartman, Sarah Elizabeth* Ickesburg 

Havice, Jessie Audrey Lewistown 

Hazen, Norma Jane Sunbury 

Herr, Betty Jayne Hazleton 

Hoke, June Hendricks* Selinsgrove 

Jamison, Olive K.** McAlisterville 

Johns, Margaret Helen Honesdale 

Johns, Roswell James Honesdale 

Kemp, Edith Sunbury 

Kinzer, Jean L.** Newport 

Lady, Charles Luther Biglerville 

Laks, Ruth Elaine Kingston 

Lehman, Selena Helen** Sunbury 

McConnell, Edith Somerton 

Machamer, Gloria Gilda* Wiconisco 

Miller, Anna Catherine Sunbury 

Mitchell, Charles Gray Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Moore, Jerry Donald** Sunbury 

Mould, Raymond DeFour Bronxville, N. Y. 

Narayan, Ongkar** British Guiana 

NefF, Anna Carpenter* Sunbury 

Nevin, Clark Gift* Sunbury 

Rohrbach, Janet Louise* Sunbury 



LIST OF STUDENTS 121 

Schreiner, Carol Kathleen Williamstown 

Sharwarko, Martha Dorothy Hazleton 

Shroyer, Shirley Irene Sunbury 

Smith, Sara Lee Scranton 

Snyder, Patricia Eleanor Sunbury 

Swiencki, Bernard Stanley Glen Lyon 

Troutman, Martha Jayne** Elizabethville 

Ulrich, Sara Ruth Selinsgrove 

Wallower, Doris Elaine* Harrisburg 

Warner, John Daniel* Schuylkill Haven 

Weller, Lawrence John Aristes 

Willard, Marian* Coatesville 

Wolfe, Almon Franklin Pottstown 

Wolfe, Vivian Catherine Williamstown 



•Attended first term only. 
•♦Attended second term only. 



GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF COLLEGE 

STUDENTS ENROLLED IN THE 

REGULAR SESSION 

1945-46 

British Guiana 1 

Connecticut 1 

District of Columbia 1 

Maryland 4 

New Jersey 21 

New York 23 

Pennsylvania 176 

227 



SUMMARY 

1945-46 

College of Liberal Arts 

M W T 

Senior 5 10 15 

Junior 4 16 20 

Sophomore 9 40 49 

Freshman 17 67 84 

Unclassified 2 2 4 

87 135 172 



122 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Conservatory of Music 

M W T 

Senior — 9 9 

Junior 16 7 

Sophomore 2 14 16 

Freshman 3 20 23 

Unclassified 17 43 60 

23 92 115 287 

Summer Terms 19 U5 

First Term 15 36 51 

Second Term 15 27 42 

Names Repeated 13 22 35 58 

Total 345 







r 










Abnormal Psychology and Mental Hygiene 92 

Academic Regulations 51 

Academic Year 55 

Accounting 38 

Administrative Officers and Staff 12 

Admission 51 

Advanced Accounting 65 

Advanced Calculus 87 

Advanced Instrumental Conducting 106 

Advisors, Vocational 36 

Aerodynamics 91 

Algebra and Geometry (Foundation of) 86 

Alumni Association 112 

American Government 83 

Ancient History 83 

American Literature 77 

Analytic Geometry and Calculus 86 

Anthropology 94 

Applied Psychology 92 

Appointment Bureau 37 

Art 60 

Athletics 22 

Attendance Regulations 55 

Auditing 65 

Awards for 1945 114 

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements 56 

Bachelor of Science Degree Requirements 57 

Bachelor of Science in Music Education 59, 101 

Bacteriology 38 

Bible and Religion 60 

Bills (Payment of) 33 

Biology 62 

Boarding Facilities 28 

Board of Directors 10 

Bond and Key 24 

Bookkeeping Teaching Methods 70 

Book Store 30 



123 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

PAGE 

Botany 62 

Buildings and Equipment 19 

Business Administration 64 

Business English 70 

Business Education 39, 50, 64, 68 

Business Mathematics 64 

Business Law . 64 

Business Principles 64 

Calendar 4 

Chemistry 66 

Choral Conducting, Advanced 107 

Chorus Class 106 

Childhood and Adolescence 93 

Classification of Students 54 

College Algebra 86 

College Calendar 7 

College Credits 98 

College Mathematics (Introduction) 86 

Commercial Curriculum (The) 71 

Commercial Education 68 

Committees of the Faculty 17 

Committee of the Board of Directors 10 

Comparative Anatomy 62 

Conservatory of Music 96 

College Credits 98 

Entrance Credits for Music 96 

Music Education 96 

Pianoforte 109 

Pipe Organ 110 

Rules and Regulations 97 

Singing 110 

Violin 111 

Conservatory Student Organization 96 

Consumer Economics 71 

Contemporary Drama 77 

Corporation Finance 72 

Cost Accounting 65 

Counterpoint 107 

Courses of Instruction 60, 102 

Course Requirements for Degrees 56, 100 

Credit Statements 54 

Day Students, Expenses 32 

Dean's Honor List 55 

Debating 76, 95 

Degrees Conferred in 1945 114 

Description of Courses 103 

Dictation I, II, and III 104, 105 



INDEX 125 

PAGE 

Discipline 24, 29 

Economic Geography 71 

Economic History of the U. S. 72 

Economics 71 

Education 73 

English 75 

English Drama 77 

English Novel 77 

English Poetry 78 

Enrollment Statistics 121 

Entrance Requirements 51 

Equipment 19 

Events, Special 31 

Exclusion from the University 30 

Expenses 32 

Faculty 13 

Faculty Committees 17 

Faculty of Conservatory of Music 15 

Fees, Special 33 

Finance 64 

Foreign Trade 73 

Fraternities 24 

French 78 

French Composition and Conversation 79 

General Science 79 

German 80 

German Composition and Conversation 80 

Government, Student 22 

Graduation Fee 32 

Graduation Requirements 53 

Greek 81 

Gregg Shorthand 69 

Guidance, Educational and Vocational 36 

Gustavus Adolphus Hall 19 

Handbook 22 

Hassinger Hall 19 

Health Service 27 

Heredity 63 

High School Teaching 41 

Histology 62, 63 

Historical 9 

History and Political Science 83 

History and Principles of Education 74 

Honor List 55 

Honors at Graduation 54 



126 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

PAGE 

Housing Facilities 28 

Introduction to Education 74 

Instrumental Courses 102 

Insurance 72 

Interests 21 

Introduction to Social Work 93 

Journalism 43 

Kappa Delta Phi 24 

Labor Problems 72 

Ladies' Auxiliary 113 

Lanthorn 22 

Latin 84 

Law 43 

Library 20 

Library Science 43 

Location 9 

Machine Accounting 65 

Major and Minor Requirements 53 

Marketing 73 

Marking System 52 

Mathematics 86 

Medical Aid and Nursing Techniques 69 

Medical Ethics 70 

Medical Secretarial 44 

Medical Shorthand 69 

Medical Terminology 69 

Ministry 45 

Money and Banking 72 

Music 88, 96 

Music and Art, Opportunities in 28 

Music Degrees Requirements 100 

Music Expenses 99 

National Honor Societies 23 

Navigation 87 

Office Practice 70 

Office Procedure 70 

Omega Delta Sigma 24 

Opportunities in Music and Art 28 

Organic Chemistry 67 

Payment of Bills 33 

Personal Attention 34 

Personal Hygiene 89 

Phi Kappa 23 

Phi Mu Delta 24 



INDEX 127 

PAGE 

Philosophy 88 

Physical Chemistry 68 

Physical Education 89 

Courses for Men 89 

Courses for Women 90 

Physical Therapy Technician 46 

Physics 91 

Pi Gamma Mu 23 

Pianoforte 109 

Pine Lawn 20 

Pipe Organ 110 

Practice Teaching 75 

Practice Teaching, Music 98 

Pre-Dentistry 47 

Pre-Medicine 47 

Pre-Nursing 48 

Pre-Theological Club 24 

Pre- Veterinary 49 

Preparation for a Career 38 

Accounting 38 

Bacteriology 38 

Business Administration 39 

Chemistry 40 

High School Teaching 41 

Law 43 

Library Science 43 

Medical Secretary 44 

Ministry 45 

Music 46 

Physical Therapy Technician 46 

Pre-Denistry 47 

Pre-Medicine 47 

Pre-Nursing 48 

Pre- Veterinary 49 

Psychology 49 

Secretarial 50 

Social Work 50 

Principles of Economics 72 

Prizes 25 

Psychology 92 

Abnormal Psychology 92 

Applied Psychology 92 

Childhood and Adolescence 93 

Educational Psychology 92 

General Psychology 92 

Psychological tests and personal techniques 93 

Social Psychology 93 

Public Finance 72 

Public Speaking 76 

Publications 22 



128 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

PAGE 

Purposes and Objectives 18 

Quality Points 52 

Recitals 97 

Recognition by Accrediting Agencies 18 

Recreation 21, 24 

Refunds 33 

Register, Student 114 

Registration _^ 52 

Regulations 51 

Religion, Courses in 60, 61 

Religious Life 21 

Reports on Grades 55 

Requirements for Admission 51 

Requirements for Graduation 53 

Requirements for Degrees 56 

Residence Requirements 54 

Resident Student Expenses 32 

Romance Languages: 

French 78, 79 

Latin 84, 85 

Spanish 94, 95 

Scholarship Grants 29 

Scholarships 25 

Scholastic Regulations 53 

Science, Bachelor of 57, 58 

Science, General 79 

Science, Library 43 

Secondary Education 42 

Secretarial Course 50 

Secretarial, Medical 44 

Semesters, Summary of 7, 8 

Shorthand 69 

Singing 110 

Social Life 21 

Social Work 50 

Sociology 93 

Sororities 24 

Spanish 94 

Special Events 31 

Special Fees 33 

Special Interest Clubs 23 

Speech 95 

Staff, Administrative Officers and 12 

Statistics on Enrollment 115 

Student Classification 54 



Susquehanna University 
Bulletin 




OFFICE OF THE DEAN 

SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

^ SEL1NSGROVE, PA, x" 



CATALOGUE ISSUE 1946-47 
ANNOUNCEMENTS 1947-1948 



SELINSGROVE 



PENNSYLVANIA 




SEIBERT HALL 



Susquehanna University 
Bulletin 



NO. I 

JANUARY-MARCH 

SERIES XLIV 

Catalogue Number 




ACADEMIC RECORD 1946-47 
ANNOUNCEMENTS 1947-48 



Published quarterly by Susquehanna University, Selinsgrove, Pennsyl- 
vania, and entered as second-class matter at Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania, 
January 1, 1923, under Act of Congress of August 24, 1912. 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 

1. College Calendar 5 

2. Historical 7 

3. Board of Directors 8 

4. Administrative Officers and Staff 10 

5. The Faculty 11 

6. Faculty Committees 15 

7. Purpose and Objectives 16 

8. Buildings and Equipment 17 

9. Student Interest 19 

10. Discipline 22 

11. Prizes 23 

12. Scholarships 24 

13. Health Service 26 

14. Housing and Boarding Facilities 27 

15. Working Positions and Scholarship Grants 28 

1(5. Special Events 29 

17. Expenses 30 

18. Personal Attention for the Individual Student 32 

19. Educational and Vocational Guidance 34 

20. Preparation for a Career 36 

21. Academic Regulations 49 

22. Course Requirements for Degrees 55 

23. Courses of Instruction 59 

Art 59 Greek 82 

Bible and Religion 60 History and Political Science _ 83 

Biology 61 Latin 85 

Business Administration 63 Mathematics 87 

Chemistry 67 Music 89 

Commercial Education 69 Philosophy 89 

Economics 71 Physical Education 90 

Education 73 Physics 92 

English 76 Psychology 93 

French 79 Sociology 94 

General Science 80 Spanish 95 

German 81 Speech 96 

24. The Conservatory of Music 97 

25. Description of Music Courses 104 

26. Susquehanna University Alumni Association 113 

27. Ladies' Auxiliary 114 

28. Degrees Conferred and List of Students 115 

29. Index 129 



CALENDAR 1947 


JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


S M T W T F 
12 3 
5 6 7 8 9 10 
12 13 14 15 16 17 
19 20 21 22 23 24 
26 27 28 29 30 31 


S 

4 

11 

18 

25 


S 

2 
9 

16 
23 


M T W T F 

3 4 5 6 7 
10 11 12 13 14 
17 18 19 20 21 
24 25 26 27 28 


S 
1 
8 

15 
22 


S 

2 
9 
16 
23 
30 


M T W T 

3 4 5 6 
10 11 12 13 
17 18 19 20 
24 25 26 27 
31 


F S 

1 
7 8 
14 15 
21 22 
28 29 


APRIL 


MAY 


JUNE 


12 3 4 

6 7 8 9 10 11 
13 14 15 16 17 18 
20 21 22 23 24 25 
27 28 29 30 


5 

12 
19 
26 


4 
11 
18 
25 


1 2 
5 6 7 8 9 
12 13 14 15 16 
19 20 21 22 23 
26 27 28 29 30 


3 

10 
17 
24 
31 


1 
8 
15 
22 
29 


2 3 4 5 
9 10 11 12 
16 17 18 19 
23 24 25 26 
30 


6 7 
13 14 
20 21 
27 28 


JULY 


AUGUST 


SEPTEMBER 


12 3 4 
6 7 8 9 10 11 
13 14 15 16 17 18 
20 21 22 23 24 25 
27 28 29 30 31 


5 

12 
19 
26 


3 

10 
17 
24 
31 


1 
4 5 6 7 8 

11 12 13 14 15 
18 19 20 21 22 
25 26 27 28 29 


2 
9 

16 
23 
30 


7 

14 
21 

28 


A 2 3 4 
8 9 10 11 
15 16 17 18 
22 23 24 25 
29 30 


5 6 

12 13 
19 20 

26 27 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


12 3 

5 6 7 8 9 10 
12 13 14 15 16 17 
19 20 21 22 23 24 
26 27 28 29 30 31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


2 

9 

16 
23 
30 


1 
3 4 5 6 7 8 
10 11 12 13 14 15 
17 18 1» 20 21 22 

24 25 a& m<m in 


•^23456 
7 % 9 10 11 12 13 , 
14 15 16 17 18 "t0 BM 

iii nr m iii tt no n 
™ fin nn »■■ 


CALENDAR 194-8 


JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


S M T W TFS 

4 ■» 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 2Mt 22 23*** 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


S 
1 
8 
15 
• 22 
29 


M T W T F 
2 3 4 5 6 
9 10 11 12 13 
16 17 18 19 20 
23 24 25 26 27 


S 
7 

14 
21 
28 


s 

7 

14 
21 
28 


M T W T 
12 3 4 
8 9 10 11 

15 16 17 18 

22 23 24 25 

29 30 $L 


F S 
5 6 
12 13 
19 20V 
B8 27 


APRIL 


MAY 


JUNE 


1 2 
4 5 6 7 8 9 
11 12 13 14 15 16 
18 19 20 21 22 23 
25 26 27 28 29 30 


3 

10 
17 
24 


2 3 4 5 6 7 
9 10 11 12 13 14 
16 17 18 19 20 21 
•23)24 25 26 27 28 
30 31 


1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


6 

13 
20 
27 


1 2 3 

7 8 9 10 
14 15 16 17 
21 22 23 24 
28 29 30 


4 5 
11 12 
18 19 
25 26 





/ 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 



SECOND SEMESTER 1946-47 

January 25 and 27, Saturday and 

Monday Mid- Year Vacation 

January 28, Tuesday, 8:00 a.m. Registration for Second 

Semester 
January 29, "Wednesday, 8 :00 a. m. — College Exercises Open on 

Regular Schedule 

March 3, Monday Academic Recognition Day 

April 2, Wednesday, noon Easter Recess Begins 

April 8, Tuesday, 1:00 p.m. College Exercises Resume 

May 10, Saturday Sub-Freshman Day and May 

Day 

May 24, Saturday Alumni Day 

May 25, Sunday Baccalaureate Service 

May 26, Monday Commencement Day 

SUMMER TERM 1947 

June 17, Tuesday Registration 

June 18, "Wednesday Classes Begin 

July 4, Friday Independence Day, Holiday 

August 9, Saturday Summer Term Ends 

FIRST SEMESTER 1947-48 

September 13, Saturday Freshman Orientation Pro- 
gram Begins 

September 16, Tuesday Freshman Registration 

September 17, "Wednesday Registration of Other Classes 

September 18, Thursday, 9 :00 a. m. -Matriculation Day Exercises 
September 18, Thursday, 10 :10 a. m. -College Exercises Open on 

Regular Schedule 
September 18, Thursday, 8 :00 p. m. -Faculty Reception to Students 

5 



6 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

October 18, Saturday Parents' Day 

October 25, Saturday Homecoming, Holiday 

November 26, Wednesday, noon Thanksgiving Recess Begins 

December 1, Monday, 1 :20 p. m. College Classes Resume 

December 18, Thursday, noon Christmas Recess Begins 

January 5, Monday, 1 :20 p, m. College Classes Resume 

January 23, Friday Semester Ends 

SECOND SEMESTER 1947-48 

January 24-26 inclusive (Saturday- 
Monday) Mid- Year Vacation 

January 27, Tuesday, 8 a. m. Registration for Second 

Semester 
January 28, "Wednesday, 8 a.m. College Classes Open on Reg- 
ular Schedule 

March 2, Tuesday Academic Recognition Day 

March 24, Wednesday, noon Easter Recess Begins 

March 30, Tuesday, 1:20 p.m. College Classes Resume 

May 8, Saturday Sub-Freshman Day and May 

Day 

May 22, Saturday Alumni Day 

May 23, Sunday Baccalaureate Service 

May 24, Monday Commencement Day 




PINE LAWN 



AERIAL VIEW OF SUSQUEHANNA CAMPUS 



THE LIBRARY 
CONSERVATORY OF 
MUSIC 



MEN'S ATHLETIC FIELD 

GUSTAVUS ADOLPHUS HALL 



HASSINGER HALL 

SELINSGROVE HALL 
SEiBERT HALL 



MENS TENNIS COURTS 

HEATING PLANT 
ALUMNI GYMNASIUM 
WOMEN'S ATHLETIC FIELD 
STEELE SCIENCE HALL 



Susquehanna University had its beginning as Missionary Institute, 
the corner-stone of which was laid on September 1, 1858. The 
founder was the Reverend Dr. Benjamin Kurtz, an eminent divine 
of the Lutheran Church of his day. The school was established to 
supply the need for more ministers. From this original motive it 
has broadened its scope to include the preparation of young men and 
young women for all honorable vocations in life, never ceasing to 
emphasize the necessity of the Christian ethic in all true education. 
In 1895, its corporate name was changed to Susquehanna Uni- 
versity. Born in faith, organized and promoted through prayer, it 
has grown steadily to its present strength. 

The following men have served as presidents : 

1858-1865 Benjamin Kurtz, D.D., LL.D. 

1865-1881 Henry Zeigler, D.D. 

1881-1893 Peter Born, D.D. 

1893-1895 Franklin P. Manhart, D.D., LL.D. 

1895-1899 J. E. Dimm, D.D., LL.D. 

1899-1901 C. W. Heisler, D.D. 

1901-1902 John I. Woodruff, Litt.D., LL.D., Acting 

President 

1902-1904 G. W. Enders, D.D. 

1904-1905 J. B. Focht, D.D. 

1905-1927 Charles T. Aikens, D.D. 

1928- G. Morris Smith, A.M., D.D., LL.D. 

LOCATION 

Susquehanna University is located at Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania, 
a town of three thousand inhabitants, five miles south of Sunbury 
and forty-five miles north of Harrisburg. The campus of sixty-two 
acres adjoins the borough limits. Selinsgrove is easily reached by 
bus connection from Sunbury, which is a main stop on the Williams- 
port division of the Pennsylvania Railroad. The Reading trains 
from Philadelphia and New York also stop at Sunbury, while 
Northumberland, seven miles from the campus, is the terminus of 
the Lackawanna Railroad from Scranton and the north. Those 
coming by motor may use Route 11, the Susquehanna Trail, or Route 
522 from Lewistown and the west. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



OFFICEKS OF THE BOARD 

William M. Rearick, A.M., D.D. President 

Rev. John F. Harkins, A.M., D.D. First Vice-President 

Claude G. Aikens, B.S. Second Vice-President 

Frank A. Eyer Secretary-Treasurer 

Hon. Charles Steele, A.M. Endowment Treasurer 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

G. Morris Smith, President 

Frank A. Eyer Dan Smith, Jr. 

Dan R. Erdman Hon. Charles Steele 

J. P. Carpenter, Esq. J. D. Bogar, Jr. 

Samuel J. Johnston W. M. Rearick 

MEMBERS 

Term Expires 1951 

Samuel J. Johnston Bloomsburg, Pa. 

I. A. Shaffer, Jr. Lock Haven, Pa. 

Rev. L. Stoy Spanqler Newport, Pa. 

Charles A. Nicely Watsontown, Pa. 

Rev. G. B. Harman Duncansville, Pa. 

F. E. Ehrenfeld, B.S. Philipsburg, Pa. 

Term Expires 1950 

Claude G. Aikens, B.S. State College, Pa. 

Frank A. Eyer Selinsgrove, Pa. 

G. Morris Smith, A.M., D.D., LL.D. Selinsgrove, Pa. 

Joiix Peters, 1320 E. Third Sr. WiUiamsport, Pa. 

John A. Apple Sunbury, Pa. 

Daw R. Erdman Sunbury, Pa. 

8 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 9 

Term Expires 19 k9 

M. P. Moller, Jr., B.S. Hagerstown, Md. 

"William M. Rearick, A.M., D.D. Mifflinburg, Pa. 

L. S. Landes, M.D., 454 W. Market St York, Pa. 

George B. Wolf, 38 W. Fourtli St. Williamsport, Pa. 

Hon. Charles Steele, A.M. Northumberland, Pa. 

Hon. John A. Hoober, LL.B., D.C.L. 124 E. Market St., York, Pa. 

Term Expires 1948 

Rev. Ross H. Stover, D.D., LL.D., 6409 N. Sixth St 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

J. Frank Thompson, E. Market and Kershaw Sts. York, Pa. 

Rev. H. Clay Bergstresser Hazleton, Pa. 

G. D. Krumrtne State College, Pa. 

P. M. Headings Lewistown, Pa. 

W. Alfred Streamer 6903 Chew St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Term Expires 19^7 

J. P. Carpenter, Esq., A.B., A.M. Sunbury, Pa. 

Rev. H. W. Miller, D.D., 1010 Elmira St. Williamsport, Pa. 

Rev. John F. Harkins, A.M., D.D. State College, Pa. 

Dan Smith, Jr., 225 E. Third St. Williamsport, Pa. 

J. D. Bogar, Jr. Harrisburg, Pa. 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 



1946-47 

G. Morris Smith, A.M., D.D., LL.D. President 

Russell Galt, Ph.D. Dean 

Mrs. Christine Wells, A.M. Dean of Women 

Isabel Nicely Secretary of Admissions 

Hilda G. Kolpin, B.S., B.S. in Lib. Sci. Librarian 

Ernest T. Yorty Business Manager 

E. Beatrice Herman, A.B. Bursar 

Edwin Monroe Brungart, A.M. Superintendent of Buildings 

and Grounds 

Mrs. Anna Miller Humphrey Dietitian 

Bertha M. Hein, R.N. Assistant to the Dean of Women 

Athalia T. Kline, A. M. Faculty Resident in the Cottage 

Mrs. Carol Kline, A.B. Preceptress in Hassinger Hall 

Marjorie Barton, B.S. Secretary to the President 

Ruth E. McCorkill, B.S. Business Secretary 

Arla M. Biloer Secretary to the Dean 

Sister Mary Jane Jessen Student Assistant in Hassinger Hall 



10 



THE FACULTY 



1946-1947 

G. Morris Smith President 

A.B., Roanoke College 1911; A.M., Princeton University 1912; 
Diploma, Lutheran Theological Seminary, Philadelphia 1919; D.D., 
Roanoke College 1928; Graduate study, Columbia University; 
LL.D., Bucknell 1940. 

Russell Galt Dean of the College 

A.B., Muskingum College 1919; A.M. 1920 and Ph.D. 1936, Colum- 
bia University; School of Oriental Studies, Cairo, Egypt, 1920-22. 

John Irwin Woodruff Professor Emeritus of Philosophy 

Diploma, Missionary Institute 1888; A.B. 1890 and A.M. 1893, 

Bucknell University; Litt.D., Wittenberg College 1903; LL.D., 
Waynesburg College 1921. 

George Elmer Fisher Professor Emeritus of Chemistry 

Diploma, Missionary Institute 1888; Ph.B., Bucknell University 
1891; Ph.D., Illinois Wesleyan University 1905. 

Theodore William Kretschmann Professor Emeritus of Bible 

and Religion 
A.B., 1888, A.M. and B.D., 1891, University of Pennsylvania; 
Diploma Lutheran Theological Seminary, Philadelphia 1891; Ph.D., 
University of Pennsylvania 1892. 

George Franklin Dunkelberger Professor Emeritus of Education 

and Psychology 

A.B., Susquehanna University 1908; A.M., University of Pitts- 
burgh 1919; Pd.D., Susquehanna University 1921; Ph.D., New 
York University 1927; Graduate study, Columbia University. 

Augustus William Ahl Professor of Greek 

Diploma, Gymnasium and Seminary, Breklum, Germany, 1908; 
A.M., Susquehanna University 1912; Ph.D., Vanderbilt Univer- 
sity 1920; Graduate study, Peabody College for Teachers, Nash- 
ville, Tenn. 

Arthur Herman Wilson Professor of English 

A.B. 1927, A.M. 1929, and Ph.D. 1931, University of Pennsylvania. 

William Adam Russ, Jr. Professor of History and Political Science 
A.B., Ohio Wesleyan 1924; A.M., University of Cincinnati 1926; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago 1933. 

11 



12 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Russell Wieder Gilbert Professor of German 

A.B., Muhlenberg College 1927; A.M. 1929 and Ph.D. 1943, Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania. 

Amos Alonzo Stagg, LL.D. Advisory Coach 

A.B., Yale University, 1888; Graduate of International Y. M. C. A. 
College, Springfield, Mass., 1891 ; M. P. E., International Y. M. C. A. 
College, 1912; A.M., Oberlin College, 1923; LL.D., College of 
Wooster, 1933; Graduate study, Yale University. 

Amos Alonzo Stagg, Jr. Professor of Physical Education 

Ph.B., 1923 and A.M., 1935, University of Chicago; A.M., Columbia 
University 1941; Graduate study, University of Chicago. 

Fisk William Stocking Scudder Professor of Biology 

A.B., Ohio Wesleyan University 1923; Ohio Wesleyan University 
1924-25; Ph.D., Cornell University 1938. 

John Jacob Houtz Associate Professor of Chemistry and Mathematics 

A.B., Susquehanna University 1908; M.S., Louisiana State Univer- 
sity 1912; Sc.D., Carthage College 1933. 

George Merritt Robison Associate Professor of Mathematics 

and Physics 

A.B. 1916, M. A. 1917, and Ph.D. 1919, Cornell University. 

Grover C. T. Graham Associate Professor of Econoynics and 

Business Administration 

A.B., William Jewell College 1909; A.M., Brown University 1910; 
Graduate study, Brown University. 

Kenneth B. Waterbury Assistant Professor of 

Education and Psychology 

B.S. 1930, M.Ed. 1933, and Ed.D. 1939, Pennsylvania State College. 

P'rederick Clement Stevens Assistant Professor in Sociology 

and History ■ 

A.B., University of Minnesota 1926; M.A., Columbia University 
1932; Graduate study, Columbia University. 

Waldemar Zagars Assistant Professor in Economics 

and Business Administration 
Dr. of Economics, University of Riga, Latvia, 1931. 

Christine Kautz Wells Dean of Women and Instructor 

in Education 

A.B., Friends University 1925; A.M., Colorado State College of 
Education 1935; Graduate study, Syracuse University. 



THE FACULTY 13 



Lenora Allison Instructor in Commercial Education 

A.B., Bowling Green College of Commerce 1930 ; M. Ed., University 
of Pittsburgh 1937. 

Athalia Tabitha Kline Instructor in French and Spanish 

A.B., Randolph Macon Woman's College 1922; A.M., Duke Uni- 
versity 1925. 

Robert Francis Whitton Meader Instructor in Latin and English 

A.B., Middlebury College 1929; M.A., University of Pennsylvania 
1931; Graduate study, Harvard University. 

Merle Vincent Hoover Instructor in Physics 

A.B., Susquehanna University 1941; A.M., George Washington Uni- 
versity 1946; Graduate study, The Pennsylvania State College, 
Georgetown University. 

Axel Reinhart Kleinsorg Instructor in English and Dramatics 

B.S., Temple University 1935; Graduate study, State University of 
Iowa, Temple University. 

Richard Dehne Strath meyer Instructor in Accounting and 

Business Administration 

B.S., Drexel Institute of Technology 1943; Graduate study, Drexel 
Institute of Technology. 

Ruth Maebelle Sparhawk Instructor in Physical Education 

B.S., Kent State University 1945. 

Bertha Mabel Hein Lecturer in Medical Secretarial Subjects 

Diploma, Allentown Hospital Training School for Nurses 1908; 
R.N., Pennsylvania State Board for Registration of Nurses 1909; 
Diploma, Baltimore Lutheran Deaconess Training School 1924. 

Hilda G. Kolpin Lecturer in Library Science 

B.S., New York State Teachers College 1927; B.S. in Lib. Sci., 
Syracuse University 1929; Graduate Study, University of Wiscon- 
sin, University of Illinois. 

John Edward Zubak Assistant Coach 

A.B., Susquehanna University 1943. 



14 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

E. Edwin Sheldon Director of Conservatory of Music, 

Professor of Pianoforte, Music Form, Canon-Fugue 

Graduate, New England Conservatory of Music 1900; Graduate, 

New York University 1921; Mus.M., Susquehanna University 1908; 

Mus.D., Susquehanna University 1939. 

Percy Mathias Linebaugh 

Professor of Pipe Organ, Pianoforte, Counterpoint 
Mus.B., Lebanon Valley College 1917; Graduate study, New York 
University, Peabody Conservatory of Music. 

Russell Condran Hatz Assistant Professor of Violin, Harmony, 

Band, Orchestra 
B.S. in Music Education, Lebanon Valley College 1937; Graduate 
study, Temple University, Juilliard Institute; A.M., Columbia 
University 1942. 

Ida Maneval Sheldon Instructor in History of Music 

Mus.B., Susquehanna University 1907; Graduate study, New York 
University. 

Mary KAthryn Potteiger Instructor in Pianoforte, Sight Singing 

Mus.B., Susquehanna University 1925; Graduate study, New York 
University. 

Alice Holmen Giauque Instructor in Public School Music Methods, 

Music Appreciation 
B.S. in Music Education 1937 and A.M. 1940, Columbia University. 

Elbert Dixon Haskins Instructor in Singing, Choral Conducting 

A.B., University of Michigan 1923; A.M., New York University 
1939; Graduate study with Bianca Randall, Paris, France, with 
Paul Althouse, New York City, and at Feagin School of Dramatic 
Art, New York City. 

Nancy Bowman Hatz Instructor in Harmony ,Band Instruments 

B.S. in Music Education, Lebanon Valley College 1936; A.M., 
Columbia University 1941. 

Diana R. Irvine Instructor in Singing 

Voice study with Perley Dunn Aldrich, Philadelphia, Pa.; with 
Douglas Stanley, New York City; Graduate study, University of 
Pennsylvania; Voice Major, School of Singing of Adele Borghi, 
Milano, Italy; Operatic Coaching with Linda Brambilla and Man- 
fredi Polverosi of Milano. 



FACULTY COMMITTEES 



1946-47 

Admission and Student Standing 
Galt, Gilbert, Graham, Nicely, Russ, Scudder, Sheldon, Wilson 

Catalogue and Curriculum 
Galt, Nicely 

Library 
Kolpin, Russ, Wilson 

Physical Education and Athletics 
Galt, Moyer,* Smith, Stagg, Witmer,* Yorty 

Public Events 
Allison, Gilbert, Linebaugh, Russ, Sheldon 

Publications 
Graham, "Wilson, Yorty 

Religious Life 
Ahl, Hein, Smith 

Social Affairs 
Galt, Gilbert, Hatz, Hein, Stagg, "Wells 

Teacher Education 
Allison, Galt, Russ, Sheldon, Waterbury, Wilson 



•Alumni representative. 

15 



PURPOSE AND OBJECTIVES 



The purpose of Susquehanna University is to provide for 
its students adequate educational facilities, and competent 
Christian scholars as teachers who shall create an environ- 
ment and an atmosphere conducive to the production of 
Christian character. The curricular objectives are the of- 
fering of liberal arts courses that shall issue in a deep, broad- 
based, well-rounded culture, and of opportunity for technical 
and vocational education in the fields of business, commerce, 
and music. Susquehanna University desires to see in its 
students true scholarship interpenetrated with a genuine 
Christian faith. 



RECOGNITION BY ACCREDITING AGENCIES 

Susquehanna University is recognized officially as a 
four-year liberal arts college by the following accredit- 
ing agencies : 

1. The Middle States Association of Colleges 
and Secondary Schools. 

2. The Pennsylvania State Department of 
Public Instruction and similar accrediting 
agencies of neighboring states. 

Susquehanna University is also a member of the As- 
sociation of American Colleges and the American 
Council of Education. 



16 



BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 



In its campus development and the addition of new buildings, Sus- 
quehanna University is following a carefully wrought-out plan. On 
the campus of more than sixty-two acres, there are at present sixteen 
brick buildings : 

Selinsgrove Hall was the first building on the campus. It was built 
in 1858 very largely through the generosity of the people of Selinsgrove 
and vicinity. During the days of Missionary Institute, from 1858 to 
1895, it was the only building on the campus, and contained a dormitory 
for men, classrooms, literary society halls, and a chapel. Selinsgrove 
Hall is a substantial three-story brick building. Today, the first floor 
accommodates the administrative offices, and the second and third floors 
serve as a dormitory for the men students. 

Seibert Memorial Hall is a commodious three-story brick building 
in the colonial style of architecture. It was erected in 1901-1902. On 
the first floor are located the reception hall, the social parlors, the chapel, 
and dining room. The second and third floors serve as the dormitory for 
the women students. In the basement are found the dispensary, the day 
students' room, the sorority rooms, and a large social room. The building 
was named in honor of Samuel Seibert, of Hagerstown, Maryland, by the 
provisions of whose will the University received $20,000. This munifi- 
cent gift from the Seibert Estate was made possible very largely through 
the efforts of Dr. S. W. Owen, of Hagerstown, Maryland, the President 
of the Board of Trustees at the time. The Moller three-manual pipe 
organ in the chapel was presented to the University by William A. 
Hassinger in memory of his wife, Mrs. Almeda M. Hassinger. 

Hassinger Memorial Hall is a modern brick fireproof dormitory. 
Dedicated June 13, 1921, it was erected substantially through the gifts 
of the family of Martin Luther Hassinger, a former director of the 
college. It has four floors, with a number of rooms arranged as suites. 
It is modern in its appointments. Hassinger Hall has been completely 
renovated and is being used as a residence for women. 

Gustavus Adolphus Hall is a large building of red brick, containing 
lecture rooms, and the offices, classrooms, and laboratories of the Depart- 
ment of Business. This is the oldest building now used for classroom 
purposes, having been completed and dedicated on February 15, 1895. 
It was originally built to house the theological seminary, not now in 
existence, and contained at one time the college administrative offices, 
student rooms, and chapel. In 1928 it was remodeled to accommodate 
the Department of Business, and the administrative offices were moved 
to the first floor of Selinsgrove Hall. 

Steele Science Hall was completed and dedicated on June 10, 1913. 
It was built largely through the gifts of the Hon. Charles Steele, other 
directors of the Board, and friends of the college. It contains the chem- 

17 



18 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

istry, physics, biology, and psychology laboratories, and a large amphi- 
theatre for laboratory demonstrations. This room contains a motion 
picture screen and projectors for both still and motion pictures. 

The Alumni Gymnasium. The present modern gymnasium was dedi- 
cated on June 3, 1935, and replaced an older building which had been 
destroyed by fire. The money for its construction was raised under the 
leadership of President G. Morris Smith through trustee, faculty, and 
alumni subscriptions, as well as from friends of the college. For full 
description of this building, see page 27. 

The Library, striking in its simplicity, was dedicated on June 8, 1928. 
It is the first unit of a larger library which is planned for the future. 

The Conservatory of Music. A three-story building, originally the 
home of Dr. Jonathan R. Dimm, a former president of the institution, 
was made over for conservatory use in 1921. Additions to it were built 
in 1925-26. It contains classrooms and individual practice rooms. 
Through the efforts of Mr. M. P. Moller, Sr., who was a member of the 
Board of Directors for twenty years, a Moller two-manual pipe organ 
was installed in the conservatory. 

The Cottage, located on the campus, serves as a girls' dormitory 
annex to Seibert Memorial Hall. 

Pine Lawn is the president's house. 

Four Duplex Faculty Residences. 

Central Heating Plant. 

Laundry. 

THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 

To supplement the instruction in the various courses, the univer- 
sity library, housed in a colonial, fire-proof building, erected in 1928, 
functions as a reference library of more than 24,316 volumes and 
nearly 3,000 volumes of bound magazines, to which additions are 
made constantly. The library is classified and arranged according 
to the Dewey decimal system, and contains both supplementary 
material and an adequate collection of the standard reference tools. 

The library is open from 8 :00 a. m. to 12 noon, 12 :30 to 5 p. m., 
and 7 to 10 p. m., Monday through Friday; Saturday from 8 :00 a. m. 
to 12 noon, and from 1 to 3 p. m. 

Books, except reference and those on the reserve shelves, may 
circulate for two-week periods. Reference books and magazines may 
not be taken from the library. Reserve books may be taken out from 
10 p. m. to 8 a. m. and at other periods when the building is closed. 

The library receives regularly about 150 periodicals, both for 
scholastic and recreational reading, three daily newspapers, one local 
weekly newspaper, the standard index services, and many other college 
publications. The library contains also the Wilt Music collection, a 
bequest of several thousand books of value to music students. It 
contains also about six hundred volumes of biography and about 
eleven hundred volumes of fiction. 

Freshmen are given ten hours of instruction in the basic tools 
of the library and the technique of using them through independent 
research. 










t\ 



v 




LIBRARY 



STUDENT INTEREST 



EELIGIOUS LIFE 

Education without religion is incomplete. Susquehanna stands for 
the steady and consistent cultivation of the religious life. Each 
student is required to take the credit courses in religion as provided 
in the curriculum, and to avail himself of the opportunities offered 
for spiritual development. He is expected to attend chapel and 
church regularly. Any student who persistently refuses to accom- 
modate himself to these opportunities for spiritual development may 
be asked to withdraw from the college. 

Open to all students, the Student Christian Association carries 
on a voluntary religious program throughout the year. By the 
example of their own lives, members seek to lead others to the full 
expression of their personalities and, through friendship, to acquaint 
new students with the ideals of college life. 

Mid-week devotional services and Sunday vespers are conducted 
under the auspices of the Student Christian Association. 

SOCIAL LIFE 

Susquehanna University, being a coeducational institution, seeks 
to supply a normal, natural development amid refined and cultural 
surroundings. The social life is under the control of a faculty com- 
mittee. All social events, with chaperons specifically named, must 
receive the approval of the faculty social committee before being 
carried out. A financial budget for each event must be submitted in 
advance for approval by the social committee before any contracts 
may be made. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND ACTIVITIES 

Student organizations may be formed by having their constitu- 
tions and by-laws approved in advance by the administration and 
faculty. All changes in the existing constitution and by-laws must 
also be approved. All college organizations (except those maintain- 
ing dormitories or dining halls) which collect dues or assessments or 
raise money otherwise for any purpose are required to keep their 
funds on deposit with the office of the bursar, thus securing a com- 
plete and accurate accounting for all funds received and spent. This 

19 



20 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

procedure is not designed to relieve the organization officers of any 
responsibility. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

Student government operates on the campus of Susquehanna 
University through five organizations: the Men's Student Council, 
the Women's Cooperative Council, the "Women's Athletic Association, 
the Intersorority Council and the Fraternity Senate. 

In all of these organizations efforts are made to initiate student 
representatives into the problems of democratic group control. There 
is vested in these organizations as much direction of campus affairs 
as students are normally able to carry successfully. These organiza- 
tions provide a practice ground for cooperation between the student 
body and the administration, which must carry the final legal respon- 
sibility for the policies of the institution. 

The form of student government followed in most of these organ- 
izations is that of a relatively large number of student representa- 
tives working with one faculty adviser. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

The Student Handbook serves as a guide and reference book 
to incoming students and especially to freshmen. It is published 
mainly through the Student Christian Association. 

The Susquehanna is the weekly, undergraduate newspaper and 
offers any student with the desire to see himself (herself) in print a 
good chance to take part in the various phases of journalism: head- 
line writing, newspaper make-up, straight news, features, sports, 
general reporting, and editing. Academic credit is optional. 

The Lanthorn is issued annually by members of the junior 
class. It contains a record of college life portrayed by pictures, 
prose, and poetry. 

ATHLETICS 

Amateur standards are maintained in football, field hockey, 
basketball, track, baseball, and tennis. In each of these activities, 
teams are maintained and a healthy spirit prevails. Team members 
and representatives command respect on every field for manliness, 
good sportsmanship, and athletic performance. Letters are awarded 
to members of varsity teams under rules of the athletic committee, 
and suitable letters or insignia of recognition are awarded to suc- 
cessful teams or competitors in minor and intra-mural sports and 
activities. The Varsity "S" Club is an organization of men who 
have won the "S" in athletics. 

The Women's Athletic Association has a9 its purpose the pro- 



STUDENT INTEREST 21 

motion of women's athletics, sports, and activities. It stimulates 
interest in physical efficiency and maintenance of ideals and good 
sportsmanship. 

NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETIES 

Tau Kappa Alpha is a national honorary forensic fraternity, 
founded for the purpose of giving recognition to those who have 
attained high honors in the field of public speaking and debating. 
The Susquehanna chapter, chartered in 1930, is one of more than a 
hundred chapters in the United States. 

Pi Gamma Mu is a national social science honor society consist- 
ing of 130 chapters with a membership of over 19,000, established to 
encourage and reward undergraduate interest in the social studies. 
The Pennsylvania Gamma Chapter was established in 1927 and has 
a membership of 185, including members of the faculty, alumni, and 
undergraduates. Members are selected on the following basis : 
evidence of special interest in social studies, at least twenty semester 
hours in the social studies, a "B" average in all social studies, a high 
scholastic standing, and good character. 

Sigma Alpha Iota Fraternity is a national music fraternity 
for women. The Susquehanna chapter, chartered in 1927, is one of 
the sixty-four chapters in the United States. Its purpose is to pro- 
mote high standards of professional scholarship, ethics, and culture, 
and to bring about a closer relationship among those pursuing some 
phase of music as a profession. 

Alpha Psi Omega is a national dramatic fraternity consisting 
of 198 chapters, organized for the purpose of providing an honor 
society for those doing a high standard of work in dramatics and 
incidentally, through the expansion of Alpha Psi Omega among the 
colleges of the United States and Canada, providing a wider fellow- 
ship for those in the college theatre. The Susquehanna chapter, 
Theta Phi, was chartered in 1941. 

SPECIAL INTEREST CLUBS 

Students with similar interests meet in organizations — usually 
once a month — and at such times programs, concerts, tours, or 
special occasions are arranged and approved. 

The Biemic Society is maintained to further the interests of 
students in biology, chemistry, and physics, and presents programs 
prepared by members or by visitors, qualified on scientific subjects. 

Phi Kappa is an organization of students who are interested in 
the cultivation of a proper appreciation of the Greek language and 
culture. At their meetings, papers prepared by the members are 
presented, and a social hour usually follows. 



22 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

The Pre-Theological Club is an organization of students who 
are preparing to enter the study of the Christian ministry. Its aim 
is to foster the spiritual life on the campus. Faculty members and 
ministers are frequently invited to speak to the group. 

The Business Society is an organization of students enrolled in 
the departments of business education and business administration. 
The Society endeavors to promote discussions of problems relating 
to education and business; to continue the building of a scholarship 
fund to aid worthy students; to inspire and encourage students to 
attain higher scholastic achievement; and to establish a closer fel- 
lowship among its members through social activities. 

The musical organizations are the University Chorus, Sym- 
phonic Society, and the Bands. Each of these organizations holds 
regular practice periods and rehearsals, and sponsors or gives public 
performances. Each group is encouraged and supported by the 
Conservatory of Music. 

SOCIAL FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES 

There are three social fraternities for men: Bond and Key, 
Theta Chi (Beta Omega chapter), and Phi Mu Delta (Mil Alpha 
chapter). Each has a home near the campus. 

There are two social sororities for women : Kappa Delta Phi and 
Omega Delta Sigma. 

These organizations have been granted certain privileges by the 
Board of Directors. Freshmen are discouraged from becoming 
pledged to a fraternity or sorority during the first semester rushing 
season if their mid-semester grades are below average. 

Freshmen pledges will be permitted to become active members of 
a fraternity or sorority in May of the freshman year provided their 
scholastic standing is satisfactory. 

A student who has completed one full year's work in another 
college and is of sophomore standing may join a fraternity or sorori- 
ty at the close of the first semester at Susquehanna University, pro- 
vided the student's conduct has been satisfactory and class standing 
has been maintained. 

DISCIPLINE 

It is assumed that all students have come to college voluntarily 
for serious study and that they will cheerfully adjust themselves to 
its ideals and regulations. The college reserves the righl to require 

the withdrawal of students whose scholarship is unsatisfactory, and 



STUDENT INTEREST 23 

of those who for any other reason are regarded as not in accord with 
the ideals and standards which the college seeks to maintain. 

A student suspended for misdemeanors loses all credit for work 
done during the semester. In any case of reinstatement, the student 
will he on probation for one semester. 

Intoxicating liquors shall not be allowed in students' rooms or 
fraternity houses. The detection of alcoholic liquors in any student's 
room, on his person or on his breath, will be held sufficient evidence to 
warrant his suspension from college. 

Drinking of intoxicating liquors, gambling, cheating, or similar 
breaches of discipline may be punished by suspension or dismissal 
from college. 

PEIZES 

1. The Stine Mathematical Prize — Through an endowment made 
by the Rev. H. M. Stine, Ph.D., D.D., of Harrisburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, there is annually provided a prize of fifteen dollars to be 
awarded to a member of the sophomore class who has the highest 
average in the study of mathematics during the freshman and 
sophomore years. The conditions under which the prizes will 
be conferred shall be subject to the regulations of the faculty. 

2. Sigma Alpha Iota National Fraternity Prize — A certificate 
is awarded by the Sigma Alpha Iota Fraternity to its senior girl 
having the highest average for four years in the music course. 

3. Omega Delta Sigma Sorority Prize — A cash prize is awarded 
by the Omega Delta Sigma Sorority to its senior girl having the 
highest academic average for her college career. 

4. Kappa Delta Phi Sorority Prize — A cash prize is awarded 
by the Kappa Delta Phi Sorority to its senior girl having the 
highest academic average for her college career. 

5. The Charles E. Covert Memorial Prize — By a bequest of 
$500.00 from the Alberta S. Covert estate, the Charles E. Covert 
memorial prize has been established to be awarded to a member 
of the junior class deemed to have exercised the most wholesome 
influence during his first three years. Elements of character, 
scholarship, attitude, and leadership will receive major consid- 
eration in awarding this prize. 

6. The Business Society Scholarship Trophy — A silver trophy 
cup, purchased by members of the class of 1950, is tobe awarded 
for one year to that member of the Freshman Class in the Busi- 
ness Education or Business Administration Department who has 
attained the highest scholastic standing during his freshman year. 



24 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

SCHOLAESHIPS 

1. The One-Half Scholarship, endowed by Mr. DeWitt Bodine, 
of Hughesville, Pennsylvania, in the amount of $500. The 
annual interest of this sum as a scholarship is under the direc- 
tion of the Council of the Lutheran Church at Hughesville, 
Pennsylvania. 

2. The Brownmiller Scholarship, of $1,000, established by Rever- 
end E. S. Brownmiller, D.D., and his son, Reverend M. Luther 
Brownmiller, A.B., of Reading, Pennsylvania. The annual 
interest of this sum is under the direction of the donors. 

3. The Bateman One-Half Scholarship, of $500, established by 
Reverend S. E. Bateman, M.D., ScD., of Atlantic City, New 
Jersey, for the benefit of the Susquehanna Synod. 

4. The Huyett Scholarship, established by Mr. E. M. Huyett, 
of Centre Hall, Pennsylvania, of $1000, to be given under the 
direction of the president of the university. 

5. The Bodine Scholarship, of $1000, established by Mrs. Emma 
B. Bodine, of Hughesville, Pennsylvania, widow of Mr. DeWitt 
Bodine, in memory of her husband, who was a director of the 
university. 

6. The Duck Scholarship, in the amount of $1000, established by 
Mr. Henry Duck, of Millheim, Pennsylvania, in memory of his 
wife. 

7. The Keiser Scholarship, in the amount of $1000, established 
by Mr. John A. Keiser, of "West Milton, Pennsylvania, in mem- 
ory of his wife. 

8. The Wieand Scholarship, in the amount of $1000, established 
by Reverend W. R. Wieand, D.D., of Altoona, Pennsylvania, in 
grateful remembrance of what Missionary Institute, now Sus- 
quehanna University, did for him in earlier years. 

9. The Mary L. Steele Scholarship, in the amount of $5000, 
established by the Honorable Charles Steele, of Northumberland, 
Pennsylvania. The income is to be used for the education of 
worthy students at Susquehanna University subject to nomina- 
tion by the donor's family. 

10. The Lena Brockmeyer Scholarship, in the amount of $1000, 
established by check received from Reverend Gh L. Rankin, then 
treasurer of Pittsburgh Synod, Wilkinaburg, Pennsylvania. 



STUDENT INTEREST 26 

11. The M. P. Moller Scholarship, in the amount of $5000, estab- 
lished by Mr. M. P. Moller, of Hagerstown, Maryland. 

12. Class Gift Scholarship — Class gifts from the graduating 
classes of 1914, 1930, 1931, and 1932 have made possible the 
establishment of a fund, the income from which makes available 
a scholarship annually for a person who has attained a high 
scholastic rank. 

13. Women's Auxiliary Scholarship, in the amount of $1000, es- 
tablished by the Women's Auxiliary of Susquehanna University. 

14. The William H. Miller Scholarship, established by William 
H. Miller, of Stoystown, Pennsylvania, in the amount of $900. 
The annual interest on this sum is a scholarship under the direc- 
tion of the administration of the University for the education of 
worthy young men preparing for the gospel ministry. 

15. The Misses Amanda and Elizabeth Smith Scholarship, en- 
dowed in the amount of $1000, the income to be available for 
worthy students for the ministry. 

16. The Lillian V. Johanson Smith Scholarship, established in 
1943 by her sister, Miss A. E. Johanson, her brother, Dr. A. M. 
Johanson, and her husband, Dr. G. Morris Smith. The amount 
of the endowment is $1,720, the interest from which is to be 
awarded from year to year to that needy student who, in the 
judgment of the scholarship committee, shows the marks of 
scholarly achievement coupled with dedication to the Christian 
spirit. 

17. The Abraham H. Heilman Scholarship, in the sum of $1000, 
established in 1945 by his son, William C. Heilman, Cambridge, 
Massachusetts. 

18. The Adeline Elizabeth Landes Scholarship, in the sum of 
$1000, established in 1945 by her son, Dr. Latimer S. Landes, 
York, Pennsylvania. 

19. The Sallie Burns Lenker Scholarship, in the sum of $5000, 
established in 1945 by Mrs. Sallie Burns Lenker, Dalmatia, Penn- 
sylvania, for students of the Lower Mahanoy Consolidated School, 
Dalmatia, Pennsylvania. It is understood that recipients of this 
scholarship shall, upon achieving earning capacity, make in 
gratitude an appropriate contribution to the Sallie Burns Lenker 
Scholarship Fund. 

20. The Della Gramly Ocker Scholarship, in the sum of $1628.45, 
established by the will of Mrs. Della G. Ocker, Harrisburg, Penn- 
sylvania, for worthy students of the ministry. 



26 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

21. The Business Scholarship, endowed in 1946 by the Business 
Society of Susquehanna University in the sum of $600 to aid 
worthy business students. 

22. The Thomas David Bittinger Scholarship in the sum of $500, 
established January 29, 1947 by his father, Charles E. Bittinger, 
in memory of his son, a former student at Susquehanna Univer- 
sity, who lost his life in World War II. 



HEALTH SEKVICE 

The success of a student in college and in later life depends 
largely upon physical fitness and reserve energy, both of which are 
fundamental to an active mind and capacity for hard and efficient 
work. The student is constantly reminded of the importance of good 
health and is urged to develop habits that lead to wise use of leisure 
time, both while in college and after graduation. 

Health activities, physical education, and intercollegiate and 
intra-mural sports are integrated into a health program which is 
required of all students. The health service embraces the following 
activities : physical examination of all students ; health supervision 
and inspection of dormitories, dining halls, kitchen, wash rooms, 
dressing rooms, and showers ; cooperation with the student's family 
physician; development of a scientific attitude toward the building 
of good health, including diet, physical exercises, control of the 
emotions, and mental hygiene. The student is taught to build a 
social and recreational program to develop qualities of cooperation, 
fair play, perseverance, self-control, and sportsmanship. The col- 
lege operates a dispensary under the supervision of a registered 
nurse, who is resident in Seibert Hall. Her services are available to 
all students in case of illness and for treatment of minor injuries. 
When the services of a physician are needed they may be obtained 
at a minimum cost. The health program is carried on largely in 
connection with the athletic fields, recreational facilities, and the 
gymnasium. 

The university field is made up of two gridirons, a soccer field, a 
baseball field, a nine-hole golf course, four tennis courts for men, and 
an excellent quarter-mile track with a 220-yard straightaway. On 
the opposite side of the gymnasium is the women's athletic field, 
including the hockey field, a socc«r field, an archery range, and five 
tennis courts. Parts of the fields are flooded during the winter 
months to provide for skating and ice hockey. 

The alumni gymnasium is 110 feet long and 65 feet wide. The 
first floor contains locker rooms, shower rooms, play rooms, and 



STUDENT INTEREST 27 

separate equipment facilities for men and women. The second floor, 
comprising the gymnasium proper, is large enough to permit two 
games of basketball to be played simultaneously. There are facilities 
for indoor baseball, volleyball, tennis, handball, badminton, and gym- 
nastic activities. At the north end of the building are separate 
offices for the directors of athletics. 

Numerous social functions and exhibitions are held in the gym- 
nasium, which has a seating capacity of more than six hundred. 

OPPORTUNITIES IN MUSIC 

Because of the presence on the campus of a Conservatory of Music 
the students of Susquehanna enjoy unusual opportunities in the field 
of music. The various musical organizations of the Conservatory 
constantly produce musical programs which are above the average. 
In addition, the college, through its Star Course, presents to the 
campus annually outstanding musical artists. 

"While the leadership in this field is naturally placed upon the 
faculty and students of the Conservatory, the various musical organi- 
zations are open to all the students of the college. 

HOUSING AND BOARDING FACILITIES 

All resident freshmen and sophomores are required to room in the 
college residences and board in the college dining hall. 

Any resident junior, senior or special student desiring to room in a 
fraternity house must first have written permission of the business 
manager. No students shall room or board at hotels, restaurants, or 
public boarding houses. Rooms are rented for the full college year 
and no change is permitted except through a written request to 
and approval of the business manager. 

No deductions will be made from the charges for board unless the 
student applying for the same has been unavoidably absent for a 
period of at least two weeks. The college reserves the right to close 
all residences as well as the dining room at stated times, especially 
during vacation periods. 

Rooms in the residences are furnished with beds, springs, mat- 
tresses, wardrobes, chairs and tables. Each student must come sup- 
plied with sheets, blankets, pillows, pillow cases, rugs, towels, pic- 
tures, and articles of decoration. It is suggested that each student 
bring a good electric study lamp. The choosing of room decorations 
such as curtains, especially where the student is rooming in a double 
or suite of rooms, should not be made until the roommate is consulted. 

Any student wilfully destroying or defacing college property will 
be required to fay the cost of replacement or repair and will be 
subject also to a fine or dismissal from the institution. 



28 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

It is assumed that all students contracting for room and board 
iu the college residences accept the responsibility of abiding by the 
rules and regulations. 

The college does not carry insurance on personal property of 
faculty members or students and is not responsible for any loss of 
property. 

Special electric appliances such as heaters, irons, high-powered 
lamps, etc., are not permitted except by arrangement with the bursar 
to cover cost of current consumed. An extra charge of $2.50 per 
semester is made for a radio in a student's room. 

Room assignments are made to returning students in April. The 
rooms are rented for the entire year, but the college reserves the 
right to change any room assignment if it deems it advisable. The 
college also reserves the right to inspect the rooms when it sees fit to 
do so. 

WORKING POSITIONS AND SCHOLARSHIP GRANTS 

Opportunities for working positions on the campus are open alike 
to men and women students. The number of positions open each 
year is variable. Opportunity for student employment is contingent 
upon the quality of the academic record maintained. Any student 
deserving such an opportunity should make application to the busi- 
ness manager before May 1. 

Scholarship grants are awarded on the basis of mental ability, 
academic achievement, general deportment, and financial need. They 
will not be renewed when the holder falls below an academic average 
of C for the school year. These grants will be reduced or withdrawn 
for unsatisfactory deportment or for an unsatisfactory academic 
record. 

BOOK STORE 

Text books and school supplies may be purchased at the Book 
Store. Students must pay directly to the store for all articles when 
purchased. Student mail is distributed from lock boxes at this store. 
The store is located at the south end of the first floor of Selinsgrove 
Hall. 

EXCLUSION FROM THE UNIVERSITY 

The Administration reserves the right to exclude at any time 
students whose conduct or academic standing it regards as undesir- 
able, and without assigning any further reason therefor; in such 
cases the fees due or which may have been paid in advance to the 
institution will not be remitted or refunded, in whole or in part, and 
neither the institution nor any of its officers shall be under any 
liability whatsoever for such exclusion. 



SPECIAL EVENTS 



To broaden and enrich the life at Susquehanna, special speakers, 
artists, and groups appear from time to time. Since the last catalogue 
was published, the following have been heard : 

1945 

October 30 Norman Cordon, bass-baritone, Metropolitan Opera As- 
sociation 

November 15 Louis Fischer, lecturer, journalist 

December 5 Judge James F. Henninger, president judge of the 
Court of Common Pleas of Lehigh County, Allen- 
town, Pennsylvania, and member of the Executive 
Board of the United Lutheran Church of America 

1946 

February 26 Ossy Renardy, violinist 

February 28 Sister Dorothy Goff, dean of the Lutheran Motherhouse, 
Baltimore, Maryland 

March 3 Dr. Charles Foelsch, president of the Lutheran Theo- 

logical Seminary, Maywood, Chicago, Illinois 

March 12 Dr. Harvey Andruss, president of the State Teachers 

College, Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania 

March 14 Mrs. Esther Van Wagoner Tufty, Washington corres- 

pondent 

April 23 Mrs. Marie Hester, U. S. Employment Office, Williams- 

port, Pennsylvania 

May 26 Dr. E. Maclay Gearhart, pastor of Luther Memorial 

Church, Erie, Pennsylvania, baccalaureate address 

May 27 Dr. Theodore A. Distler, president of Franklin and 

Marshall College, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, com- 
mencement address 

September 29 The Reverend Carl A. Honeycutt, pastor of Zion Luth- 
eran Church, Sunbury, Pennsylvania 

October 15 Andreas Schanke, Norway, member of the staff of the 
World Student Christian Federation 

October 16 Leonard Pennario, pianist 

November 9 "Hasty Heart" a play presented by the Theatre Guild 
of Susquehanna University 

November 12 Cambridge Collegium Musicum 

November 20 "Macbeth," presented by the National Classic Theatre 

December 3 Hector Bolitho, British historian and biographer 

December 10 Dr. C. V. Erdly, superintendent of schools, Lewistown, 
Pennsylvania 

December 12 "H. M. S. Pinafore," operatta presented by the students 
of the Conservatory of Music 



29 



EXPENSES 



RESIDENT STUDENTS 

The Tuition charge to resident students is $12.00 per semester hour. 
The total costs for the year, including tuition, board, room rent, and 
all other expenses except special fees, are approximately as follows, 
depending upon choice of room: 

Men PER YEAR 

Tuition ($12 per semester hour) 

Liberal Arts (32 hrs. for the year) $384.00 

Activities Fee 25.00 

Board 300.00 

Books (estimated) 35.00 

Average Room Rent for Men 90.00 

Approximate cost for year $834.00 



Women 
Tuition ($12 per semester hour) 

Liberal Arts (32 hrs. for the year) $384.00 

Activities Fee 25.00 

Board 300.00 

Books (estimated) 35.00 

Average Room Rent for Women 105.00 

Approximate cost for year $849.00 

The tuition general expenses for the Music Education Course is 
$450.00 a year. For further details see page 100. 



DAY STUDENTS 

The tuition charge to day students is $12.00 per semester hour. 
Special fees are extra. 

30 



EXPENSES 31 

SPECIAL FEES 

Alumni Association life membership, senior year, 

second semester $5.00 

Accounting, All Courses 5.00 per semester 

Botany, zoology, comparative anatomy, bacteriology 

embryology and histology 4.00 per semester 

Change of registration 1.00 per semester 

Chemistry, all courses 6.00 per semester 

Commercial education 15, 16, 25, 26, 5.00 per semester 

Experimental physics 6.00 per semester 

Health and dispensary service 2.50 per semester 

Surveying 3.00 per semester 

Graduation fee, senior year, second semester 8.00 

Observation and practice teaching, senior year 2.50 per credit 

Transcript of record (after first copy) 1.00 

The special fees for each semester must be paid in advance or at the 
time of registration. 

PAYMENT OF BILLS 

To facilitate matriculation it is requested that a check covering 
all fees due at the beginning of the session be sent to the Bursar in 
advance of the arrival of the student. Checks should be made pay- 
able to Susquehanna University. No student is registered until his 
bill has been settled in the Bursar's office. 



TRANSCRIPTS AND GRADUATION 

Satisfactory settlement of all bills and fees is required before 
semester grades or an honorable dismissal can be granted and trans- 
cript of grades released. No student will be graduated until all final 
obligations to the college, class publications, organizations and clubs 
are settled. This includes class assessments voted by a majority of 
a class in a regularly called meeting. 

REFUNDS 

No fee will be refunded unless serious illness or other cause 
entirely beyond the control of the student compels withdrawal from 
the college. Students dismissed for unsatisfactory work or for in- 
fringement of college rules are allowed no refunds. There will be 
no refunds for courses dropped two weeks after registration day. 



PERSONAL ATTENTION FOR THE 
INDIVIDUAL STUDENT 



Susquehanna lias always maintained a faculty large enough to give 
personal attention to each individual student. It has, therefore, been 
possible to provide close personal attention and counselling. 

The transition from high school to college is a difficult one. Col- 
lege work is heavier and more exacting. It requires more time for 
study than the average high school senior has previously found 
necessary. In addition, college freshmen are living away from home, 
and the problems of adjusting their lives to new surroundings and 
new people are difficult and perplexing. So great are the difficulties 
of this transition stage that the number of students who fail because 
of them during the first two years of college is exceedingly high. 
For many students, the warm, friendly, personal atmosphere of the 
Susquehanna campus has meant success in solving these problems. 

Susquehanna's policy is to provide personal attention for those 
who need it. Students who are capable of directing their own col- 
lege studies and affairs successfully are not required to have faculty 
members counsel and guide them. Students learn by doing, and for 
those who do well, nothing is so retarding as unnecessary supervision. 

This does not mean that students are left to do as they please. 
Personal supervision for all naturally results from an adequate 
faculty, small classes, and a self-contained campus located on the 
outskirts of a college town of 3,000 persons. But in addition to this 
naturally favorable situation, the following specific program is the 
heart of Susquehanna's personalized education for those who need it : 

(1) All freshmen are given placement tests on entering the college, 
the results of which, together with their high school records, guide the 
Administration in its immediate handling of the students. 

If their records show that they have done good work and are poten- 
tially capable of continuing to do good work, they are allowed to carry 
on their college programs with a minimum of guidance. This is supplied 
by those professors in the subject-matter fields of their choice, who 
assist them in making out their semester schedules of studies. They are 
also under the close supervision of their classroom instructors, the dean 
of women, and the dean of the college. 

If their records show that they are not strong students, they are 
assigned to a faculty adviser, who talks over their records with them, 
discusses study habits, and helps make out study schedules. 

82 



PERSONAL ATTENTION 



(2) If, at any marking period, students fail to make the minimum 
passing standard, they are assigned to a faculty adviser (if they do not 
already have one). 

(3) In addition to the above, the dean of women and the dean of 
the college give special attention to failing students by holding personal 
interviews with them and keeping their parents informed of the progress 
of each case. 

(4) At the end of each semester the complete records of failing 
students are reviewed by a faculty committee representing the main fields 
of study. At this review, reports from the faculty advisers are read 
and the strength and weakness of the students are evaluated. For those 
students who have possibilities of improvement, the committee prescribes 
programs of studies, regulates their extra-curricular activities, notifies 
the parents of the difficulties, and calls the attention of professors to 
these cases. 

By such specific actions does Susquehanna make failure in college a 
difficult thing and by such practical procedure does it make individualized 
education a reality. 



EDUCATIONAL AND VOCATIONAL 
GUIDANCE 



During the Orientation Program each new student is given a series 
of college aptitude and placement tests. An opportunity is given each 
student to confer with a member of the teaching staff to outline the 
work of the freshman year. 

The Dean maintains a central personnel file in which all the 
students' records from various sources are collected. These are used 
to aid the student in coming to an intelligent adjustment to college 
life. 

~Not later than the end of the sophomore year each candidate for 
the B.A. degree is required to select some field in which he expects 
to concentrate his work. This is expressed in a major and a sup- 
porting minor. When the selection of a major has been made, the 
professor at the head of that department becomes the student's 
adviser and replaces the general adviser of the freshman and sopho- 
more years. The major adviser in consultation with the student 
completes an outline of the student's program of study for the 
remainder of his college course. These major advisers work in con- 
junction with the professional advisers who are acquainted with the 
specific requirements of a particular profession. 

Vocational planning is furthered by : 

1. Encouraging the student to secure accurate information about the 

vocation in which he is interested and by building up a body of 
qualifications to be successful in the occupation. 

2. Giving of vocational interest tests to students who believe they 

possess special interests or abilities, or to those who are 
undecided. 

3. Maintaining a series of references in the library on a special shelf 

where students may get acquainted with the literature about the 
different professions. 

4. Informing students who plan to enter the professions or pursue 

further study, on such matters as schools, admissions, costs, 
scholarships, and courses. The following professional advisers 
have been designated for this purpose : 

34 



GUIDANCE 35 

Profession or Occupation Advisers 

Accounting Graham 

Business Graham 

Chemistry Houtz 

Commercial Education Allison 

Dentistry Scudder 

Diplomatic or Government Service Russ 

Teaching Waterbury 

Journalism Wilson 

Law Russ 

Library Service Kolpin 

Medical Professions Scudder 

Ministry and Religious Education President Smith 

Music Sheldon 

Nursing Hein 

Psychology Waterbury 

Physics Hoover 

Radio and Aviation Hoover 

Secretarial Allison 

Veterans' Education Galt 



THE APPOINTMENT BUREAU 

The College maintains an Appointment Bureau for the benefit of 
graduating seniors and alumni. This service is given free of charge. 
Positions are not definitely guaranteed, but a large percentage of 
students have been placed through Appointment Bureau contacts. 
In the past it has been primarily a placement agency for those 
entering the teaching profession, but recently, definite work has been 
done to widen the Bureau's scope, and to secure contacts with private 
firms, large corporations, and State and Federal Civil Service. 

Typical positions which it has been called upon to fill include 
radio research, aircraft engineering, research chemistry, high school 
principalships, Y. W. C. A. secretaryships, psychiatric nursing, credit 
investigation, medical secretaryships, and high school teaching in 
liberal arts, commercial, and music fields. 



A college education is intended to enrich the student's cultural 
life and to prepare him to earn his living in a worthy profession. 
In many professions a rich cultural foundation, or general education, 
is the basis for later professional specialization. Susquehanna'? 
curricula offer a wide variety of vocational choices. 

The following outlines of courses leading to vocations are sug- 
gestive. While some subjects are of necessity required for a par- 
ticular profession, the Administration permits as much flexibility 
as possible after basic requirements are met. 

ACCOUNTING 

A complete program in this field is offered at Susquehanna. The 
courses are listed under Business Administration. Students who are 
interested in becoming certified public accountants in Pennsylvania, 
New York, or other states, should consult the head of the Department 
of Business Administration concerning requirements for certificates 
as Certified Public Accountants. 

BACTERIOLOGY (Laboratory Technician) 

A new profession for women has opened up in the general field 
of bacteriology, in which specialized training leads to the career of 
laboratory technician in doctors' laboratories, hospitals and public 
health service. A laboratory technician is trained to perform the 
various chemical, microscopic and bacteriological tests used in the 
diagnosis and treatment of disease. The course consists of two 
parts: (1) a minimum of two years in college, followed by (2) a full 
year of practical work in an accredited hospital. The length of the 
college work varies, some hospitals demanding a full four-year col- 
lege course before permitting the student to enter for the year of 
practical work. Susquehanna has successfully prepared students 
for both the minimum and maximum requirements, and the course 
as outlined meets the pre-professional requirements of the Registry 
of Medical Technologists. The suggested four-year course of study 
is as follows: 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

History of Western Europe 3 3 

36 



PREPARATION FOR A CAREER 37 

First Second 

Freshman Year (Continued) Semester Semester 

*Foreign Language or an Elective 3 3 

General Chemistry 3 3 

Zoology 3 3 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 3 

*Foreign Language or Prin. of Sociology 3 3 

Bible 2 2 

Comparative Anatomy or Histology 3 3 

American History 3 3 

Quantitative Analysis 3 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

Junior Year 

General Psychology 3 

Applied Psychology 3 

Organic Chemistry 4 4 

Christian Philosophy 2 

Ethics 2 

Bacteriology 3 

Heredity 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

Electives 6 6 

Senior Year 

Embryology 3 

Physiology 3 

Qualitative Chemistry 3 3 

Introductory Physics 4 4 

Electives 6 6 



BUSINESS ADMINTSTKATION 

For many years Susquehanna has been offering specialized train- 
ing for those young men and women who desire to enter business as 
a vocation. There are opportunities for graduates of this course to 
become accountants, salesmen, bankers, advertising men, statisticians, 
real estate and insurance specialists, and business analysts. There 
are opportunities in government service for those with a major in 
economics or accounting. The course is well balanced with general 
education and the basic studies of the business world. 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Economic Geography 3 

Business Mathematics 3 

Elementary Accounting 3 3 

*Students planning to take the four-year course should elect a foreign language. 



38 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

First Second 

Freshman Year (Continued) Semester Semester 

Science Survey 3 3 

Business Law 3 3 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 ' 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 

Business English 3 

Bible 2 2 

General Psychology 3 

Economics 3 3 

American History or Sociology 3 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

Elective 3 6 

Junior and Senior Years 

Additional courses must be taken to complete the requirements 
for graduation as outlined on page (56). These include Ethics (2), 
Christian Philosophy (2), American Government (6), the required 
number of electives in general education, and the required number of 
hours in Business Administration and Economics selected from the 
following courses in consultation with the head of the department : 

Economic Geography 3 

Economic History 3 

Business English 3 

Mathematics of Finance 3 

Business Management 3 

Personnel Management 3 

Advanced Business Law 3 

Machine Accounting 3 

Intermediate Accounting 6 

Advanced Accounting 3 

Cost Accounting 3 

Auditing 3 

Federal Tax Accounting 3 

Statistical Methods 3 

Marketing 3 

Advertising 3 

Salesmanship 3 

Consumer Economics 3 

Investments 3 

Insurance 3 

Money and Banking 3 

Labor Problems 3 

Foreign Trade 3 

History of Economic Thought 3 

Comparative Economic Systems 3 

HIGH SCHOOL TEACHING 

Susquehanna has had an outstanding record in the training of 
successful high school teachers and administrators. Her graduates 
in large numbers are serving as District Superintendents, County 



PREPARATION FOR A CAREER 39 

Superintendents, and Principals. Training is offered in Secondary- 
Education, Commercial Education, and Music Education. 

Eighteen hours in the field of education are required for cer- 
tification in Pennsylvania.* These must include Introduction to 
Teaching, 3 hours; Educational Psychology, 3 hours; Practice 
Teaching, 6 hours ; and 6 hours of electives in education. Eor Liberal 
Arts candidates Susquehanna requires that one of these electives be 
a course in the Techniques of Teaching, 3 hours. In addition the 
Department of Public Instruction requires a basic course in American 
and Pennsylvania History. 

In Secondary Education, majors are offered in English, French, 
German, Latin, history, mathematics, chemistry, physics and biology. 
In addition to the eighteen prescribed hours of education, the State 
requires twenty-four hours in the first teaching field, and eighteen 
hours in each additional field, for certification. However, the State 
gives certification to teach the social studies, (namely, history, civics, 
Problems of Democracy, economics, and sociology) by taking 9 hours 
of history and 3 hours each of political science, economics, and soci- 
ology, totalling eighteen hours. Certification is also given to teach 
Science (namely, physics, chemistry, biology, and general science) 
by taking 9 hours of Physical Science, divided into 6 hours of chemis- 
try and 3 hours of physics (or vice versa), and 9 hours of Biological 
Science, divided into 6 hours of zoology, and 3 hours of botany (or 
vice versa). 

SECONDARY EDUCATION 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 3 

History of Western Europe 3 3 

Bible 2 2 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 3 

American History 3 3 

General Psychology 3 

Educational Psychology 3 

Christian Philosophy 2 

Ethics 2 

Physical Education 1 1 

The first two years for those who plan to specialize in mathe- 
matics or science will differ slightly from the above according to the 



*For New Jersey and New York requirements see pp. 73-74. 



40 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

specific major requirements found under course descriptions for each 
major field. 

The last two years in the liberal arts fields will be planned in 
conjunction with the faculty adviser in each field, in accordance with 
degree and major requirements. 

Public Speaking is a required course for all teaching candidates. 

COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 

For the specialized curriculum required by the Pennsylvania 
State Department of Public Instruction for teachers of the commer- 
cial subjects, see pages 57-58. 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

For the specialized curriculum required by the Pennsylvania 
State Department of Public Instruction for teachers of public school 
music, see pages 102-103. 

JOURNALISM 

The most adequate preparation for a career in journalism is a 
four-year liberal arts course with a major in English, and a broad 
cultural program in the social sciences, languages, and psychology. 
This should be followed by at least a year's study in a graduate school 
of journalism, although positions may be had on newspapers or 
magazines directly after leaving college. The outline for the first 
two years of the liberal arts course is found on page 55. Oppor- 
tunities are offered in college •for students to obtain experience in this 
field by working on the college newspaper, The Susquehanna. 

LAW 

Entrance to an accredited law school is usually preceded by a 
four-year college course in which emphasis is placed on such funda- 
mental subjects as history, English, foreign languages, psychology, 
science and social sciences. 

First Second 

Fresh/man Yewr Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science , 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 3 

History of Western Europe 3 3 

Bible 2 2 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 3 

Christian Philosophy 2 

Ethics 2 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

Science or Mathematics 3 3 



PREPARATION FOR A CAREER 41 

First Second 

Sophomore Year Semester Semester 

General Psychology 3 

Educational or Applied Psychology 3 

American History 3 3 

The junior and senior years should be planned with the faculty 
adviser to pre-legal students in accordance with the requirements of 
the law school for which the student is preparing. Electives in Busi- 
ness Administration and Economics are acceptable to some law 
schools. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 

A four-year course from an approved college is a prerequisite for 
entrance to schools of library science. Students should choose early 
the school at which they expect to do their graduate work in library 
science and plan their undergraduate work to meet its requirements. 
Such students should also apply for employment in the College 
Library as student assistants. 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 3 

History of Western Europe 3 3 

Bible 2 2 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 3 

Christian Philosophy 2 

Ethics 2 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

Science or Mathematics 3 3 

General Psychology 3 

Educational or Applied Psychology 3 

American History 3 3 

The student preparing for library school should plan to major in 
English and minor in history and political science, with supple- 
mentary courses in economics and sociology. A year of typing is 
included in this course in the junior year. 

MEDICAL SECRETARIAL 

An increasing demand for specially trained persons to act as 
secretaries for physicians, hospitals, and laboratories, has led Susque- 
hanna to incorporate such training into its Business Department. A 
suggested four year curriculum leading to the B.S. degree is as 
follows : 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 






First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Zoology or Chemistry 3 3 

Shorthand and Typing 5 5 

Bible 2 2 

Medical Terminology 1 

Home Nursing 1 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 3 

General Psychology 3 

Business Mathematics 3 

Biology 21 «~ Chemistry 11 3 3 

Sociology : 2 3 3 

Typewriting 2 2 

Shorthand . 3 3 

Physical Educate. 1 1 

Junior Year 

American History < 3 3 

Biology 31 or Chemistry 21 _•._. 3 3 

Medical Ethics 2 

Medical Office Practice 2 

Business English 3 

General Office Practice 3 

Applied Psychology 3 

Elementary Accounting 3 

Christian Philosophy 2 

Ethics 2 

Physical Education 1 1 

First Second 

Senior Year Semester Semester 

Medical Shorthand 3 3 

Biology or Chemistry 3 3 

Advanced Sociology 3 

Family 

Abnormal Psychology 3 3 

Electives 6 6 



MINISTRY 

Theological seminaries generally require a four-year college 
course for entrance. The American Association of Theological 
Schools has stated that the college work of pre-theological students 
should result in acquaintance with the world of today, in the ability 
to use certain tools of the educated man, and in a sense of achieve- 
ment. The ministry needs men of broad culture. To this end, the 
student preparing to enter the Seminary should lay emphasis on the 
liberal arts program in college rather than the elements commonly 
known as pre-professional. 



PREPARATION FOR A CAREER 43 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 3 

History of Western Europe 3 3 

Bible 2 2 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 3 

American History 3 3 

General Psychology 3 

Applied Psychology 3 

Christian Philosophy 2 

Ethics 2 

Physical Education 1 1 

In the junior and senior years, pre-theological students ordinarily 
choose a major from the classical languages, English, history, or 
sociology. 

Public Speaking is a required course for all pre-theological 
students. 

The following are recommended as electives : 

Introduction to Philosophy 3 

History of Philosophy 3 

Modern Philosophers 3 

Principles of Sociology 6 

Principles of Economics 6 

Modern Social Problems 3 

The Family 3 

Abnormal Psychology 6 

Typing 4 

Techniques of Teaching 3 

American Literature 4 

Shakespeare 4 

American Government 3 

MUSIC 

Susquehanna has for many years emphasized the importance of 
music by maintaining a fully staffed Conservatory of Music. For 
full details of the specialized curriculum offered for the training of 
public school music teachers, see pages 102-103. 

PHYSICAL THEKAPY TECHNICIAN 

There is an increasing demand for physio-therapists. They will 
be needed for many years after the war. 

The physical therapy technician treats disorders, such as frac- 
tures, sprains, nervous diseases, and heart trouble according to a 



44 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

patient's needs or as prescribed by a physician, rendering treatments 
encompassing all of the physical therapeutic arts; gives exercises to 
patients designed to correct muscle ailments and deficiencies; admin- 
isters massages and performs other body manipulations; administers 
artificial sunray treatments, ultraviolet, or infrared ray treatments, 
therapeutic baths, and other water treatments. 

Requirements for registration as a physical therapy technician 
include 60 college semester hours, with courses in biology arid chem- 
istry, and a year of physical therapy in a school approved by the 
Council of Medical Education and Hospitals of the American Medi- 
cal Association. 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Zoology 3 3 

Principles of Sociology 3 3 

General Chemistry 3 3 

Bible 2 2 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 3 

Comparative Anatomy 3 3 

Physics or Chemistry 4 4 

General Psychology 3 

Applied Psychology 3 

American History 3 3 

Physical Education 1 1 



PRE-DENTISTRY 

The American Council on Dental Education has prescribed a 
minimum of two full years of college as a requirement for entrance 
to dental schools. The requirement is difficult to accomplish in two 
years and many students take more time. The trend in dentistry, 
as in the other professions, is toward a full four-year college course 
before entering dental school. 

Pre-dental students should choose a dental college at their earliest 
possible opportunity and after securing a catalogue of that institu- 
tion, should arrange their courses at Susquehanna so that they will 
meet the specific entrance requirements of the chosen dental college. 
This should be done with the faculty advisor. The following is sug- 
gested as a tentative program for the first two years : 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Bible 2 2 

History of Western Europe 3 3 



PREPARATION FOR A CAREER 45 

First Second 
Freshman Year (Continued) Semester Semester 

General Chemistry 3 3 

Zoology 3 3 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 3 

Comparative Anatomy 3 3 

Organic Chemistry 4 4 

Introductory Physics 4 4 

General Psychology 3 

Applied Psychology 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

Students who continue in the pre-dental course will arrange their 
schedules with their faculty adviser. 

PKE-MEDICINE 

Medicine is one of the most difficult professions, and a student 

should not seek to enter the pre-medical course unless he has stood in 
the upper half of his high school graduating class. 

Pre-medical students at Susquehanna are given close personal 

supervision by an adequate group of science professors experienced 

in preparing students for the difficult study of medicine. The course 

listed below is merely suggestive since the requirements for admission 
to medical schools vary. 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

German or French 3 3 

History of Western Europe 3 3 

General Chemistry 3 3 

College Algebra and Trigonometry 3 3 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 3 

German or French 3 3 

Bible 2 2 

General Psychology 3 

Qualitative Chemistry 3 3 

Zoology 3 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

Junior Year 

Christian Philosophy 2 

Ethics 2 

Organic Chemistry 4 4 

Physics 4 4 



46 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

First Second 

Junior Year (Continued) Semester Semester 

Comparative Anatomy 3 3 

Histology or Embryology and Physiology 3 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

Senior Year 

Social Science 3 3 

Quantitative or Physical Chemistry 3 3 

Histology or Embryology and Physiology 3 3 

Electives 6 6 

PKE-NURSE^G 

The ordinary hospital will accept high school graduates as candi- 
dates for nurses' training. Those who desire to enter the larger 
hospitals will do well to take at least one year of college work before 
beginning the strenuous life of nurses' training. 

Those who desire administrative and supervisory careers in 
nursing should plan for a combined five years' course (two years in 
college and three years in nurses' training). Some hospitals, such as 
the Medical Center of Columbia University in New York City, pro- 
vide for the Bachelor of Science degree as well as the nurse's certifi- 
cation at the completion of such a five-year course. 

A suggested two-year pre-nursing course is as follows : 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Zoology 3 3 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Electives: Foreign Language 3: 9 9 

: Principles of Sociology 3: 

: General Chemistry 3: 

: History of Western Europe 3: 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 3 

Comparative Anatomy 3 3 

Bible 2 2 

General Psychology 3 

Applied Psychology 3 

Electives: Foreign Language 3: _ 6 6 

: American History 3 

: General Chemistry* 3 

: Principles of Sociology* 3 
Physical Education 1 1 

•These courses should be elected if not taken in Freshman Year. 

PRE-VETERINARY 

Susquehanna offers the two years of college work required for 
entrance into schools of veterinary medicine. The course is as 
follows : 



PREPARATION FOR A CAREER 47 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Bible 3 3 

History of Western Europe 3 3 

General Chemistry I 3 3 

Botany 3 3 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 3 

Organic Chemistry 4 4 

Zoology 3 3 

General Psychology 3 

Elective 3 

Introductory Physics 4 4 

Physical Education 1 1 



PSYCHOLOGY 

Those who are interested in this field will find opportunities as 
clinical psychologists in child guidance clinics, school systems, hospi- 
tals, and law courts. Positions are also open as industrial psycholo- 
gists with employment offices, in government, industry, or in research. 
Graduate study is necessary for these positions after completing the 
requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in 
psychology. Those interested in clinical psychology should take 
additional work in chemistry and biology, and those interested in 
industrial psychology should take supplementary work in sociology 
and economics. 






SECRETARIAL 



Two, three, and four-year courses for secretaries are available. 
Those who take the four-year course, and prepare for executive and 
other secretarial positions open in the business world to college grad- 
uates, will receive the degree of Bachelor of Science. A suggested 
schedule for the first two years is as follows : 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Economic Geography 3 

Business Mathematics 3 

Elementary Accounting 3 3 

Shorthand and Typing 5 5 

Personal Hygiene 1 

Bible 2 

Physical Education 1 1 



48 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 

Business English 3 

General Psychology 3 

Machine Accounting 3 

Office Practice 3 

Salesmanship 3 

Business Law 3 3 

Typing and Shorthand 5 5 

Physical Education 1 1 

SOCIAL WORK 

Those who are planning to be social workers should take a four 
year liberal arts course with a major in sociology, and additional 
courses in psychology, economics, and similar subjects to provide a 
broad cultural background. Upon graduation from college the 
student who wishes to be a professional social worker should go to a 
specialized graduate school of social work for one or two years. Po- 
sitions as visitors in the Pennsylvania Department of Welfare and 
Public Assistance require graduation from college. 



ADMISSION 

Susquehanna's policy is one of individualized attention for all stu- 
dents. In line with this policy, provision is made to accept for 
entrance any student with fifteen units from an accredited secondary 
school who shows promise of succeeding in college, regardless of the 
distribution of the high school units. In determining an applicant's 
eligibility for admission, the Committee on Admissions examines evi- 
dence relating to the whole personality of the applicant. This evi- 
dence relates to his scholarship, to his character and ideals, to the 
general character or pattern of his study in high school, to his pur- 
pose in attending college, to his health, and to other points of strength 
or weakness in his school preparation, personality, and general cul- 
tural background. 

A candidate must present evidence of good moral character as 
well as of proficiency in those studies which are prerequisites for 
the curriculum desired. A satisfactory certificate from the high 
school or preparatory school will be accepted as evidence that the 
scholastic requirements for entrance have been met. 

A student entering Susquehanna University is required to have a 
medical examination before his registration is completed. Blanks 
for this purpose will be furnished by the Secretary of Admissions 
shortly before registration. 

All new students are required to take scholastic aptitude tests. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

A minimum of fifteen units is required if the student enters from 
a four-year, fully accredited high school or secondary school, or 
twelve units if he enters from a three-year fully accredited senior 
high school or secondary school. The units should be distributed as 
follows : 

Foe the Bachelor of Arts Degree 

The following pattern of subjects is recommended for entrance, 
but those students who desire to pursue this course, and lack one or 
more of these requirements, will be given a chance to correct the 
deficiency during the freshman year.* 



•Students planning to take Pre-Medical, Pre-Dental, Pre- Veterinary or other pre- 
professional courses must satisfy the state requirements for secondary work in these 
professions. In general, these requirements follow the pattern recommended for 
entrance to course leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree. 

49 



50 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

English, 3 units; Foreign Language, 2 units of one language; 
Mathematics (including Algebra and Plane Geometry), 2 units; His- 
tory, 1 unit; Science, 1 unit; and electives to make fifteen units. 

For the Bachelor of Science Degree i 

English, 3 units; History, 1 unit; Science, 1 unit, and electives to 
make fifteen units. 

For the Bachelor of Science in Music Education Degree 
Candidates for this degree must present fifteen units of secondary 
school work, and show evidence of aptitude in music. 



ADMISSION WITH ADVANCED STANDING 

Special blanks for admission with advanced standing will be 
provided upon request. The candidate must list all institutions he 
has previously attended even though advanced standing credit is not 
desired from all of them. The following credentials are necessary: 
(1) Certificate from the high or preparatory school attended or 
equivalent, (2) Official transcript and statement of honorable dis- 
missal from each institution attended, (3) Marked catalogue from 
each institution attended showing courses completed. 

In the absence of equivalent college work, advanced standing by 
examination may be arranged in consultation with the Dean of the 
College. 

Semester credit hours will not be granted in excess of quality 
points earned. 



EEGISTRATION 

At the beginning of the college year each student will be given 
instructions about enrollment in classes and the payment of bills. 

For registration after the day announced, a charge of five dollars 
will be made. No students will be permitted to register later than 
two weeks after registration day. No course may be changed one 
week after registration day. If a change of registration is made 
after the one week period, a charge of one dollar will be made. A 
course dropped without the permission of the dean and the instructor 
will be recorded as a failure. 



MAEKING SYSTEM AND QUALITY POINTS 

A (90-100) Excellent 3 quality points for each credit hour 

B (80-89) Good 2 quality points for each credit hour 

C (70-79) Average 1 quality point for each credit hour 

D (60-69) Passing quality point for each credit hour 

F (Below 60) Failure No credit unless repeated 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 51 

No D grade will be counted towards a major. If a student fails 
to earn a satisfactory grade in a course in his major, the course must 
be repeated at Susquehanna if credit toward his major is desired. 
Summer school work elsewhere will not meet requirements for the 
major. 

SCHOLASTIC REGULATIONS 

A student who fails to earn at least fourteen semester hours credit 
with an equal number of quality points per semester shall be on 
scholastic probation. Two successive semesters of failure, resulting 
in scholastic probation, will automatically cause a student to be 
dropped from the college. 

Work left incomplete because of illness or other unavoidable cir- 
cumstances must be completed within the next semester in attendance. 

The normal schedule of a student is sixteen or seventeen credits 
each semester, depending on his total coutse requirements. To carry 
more than this number, a student must have an average mark of B 
during the preceding semester, and must secure permission from the 
dean. 

The minimum load of a regular student is fourteen credits and 
the maximum is twenty credits. A special student carrying fewer 
than fourteen hours a week will pay twelve dollars per semester hour 
and special fees. 

There will be no refund for courses dropped two weeks after 
registration day. A transcript and a certificate of honorable dis- 
missal will be issued only after full payment of all fees. 

MAJORS AOT) MINORS 

The courses of study are known as general required courses, 
major courses, minor courses, and elective courses. 

As early as possible, and not later than the end of the sophomore 
year, each candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Arts should 
choose one major field in which he intends to concentrate, and 
one minor field. A major field is one pursued for at least twenty- 
four semester hours, and a minor is one pursued for at least eighteen 
semester hours. The program of major and minor fields shall be 
arranged by the student in consultation with the registrar of the 
college and the professor in the field chosen as a major. A major 
may be chosen from the following: 

Biological Sciences Mathematics 

Classical Languages Modern Languages 

Economics Philosophy 

English Literature* Physical Sciences 

History and Political Psychology 

Science Sociology 

*A minor in English Composition is offered. For details see page 76. 



52 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

No major may be changed except by the consent of the dean and 
the department concerned. 

Majors and minors are of concern only to students in the Liberal 
Arts Course. Those in Business Administration, Commercial Edu- 
cation and Public School Music will follow the detailed programs 
outlined for these curricula elsewhere in this catalogue and disregard 
majors and minors. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

Susquehanna University offers one curriculum consisting of four 
years of college work leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree. This 
curriculum provides a broad, liberal culture which serves as the 
proper foundation for any of the learned professions or for speciali- 
zation in graduate study, and provides a broad basis of general 
knowledge. The Bachelor of Arts degree is conferred only after a 
student has satisfactorily completed 132 semester hours with at least 
132 quality points. 

The Bachelor of Science degree is given in Business Administra- 
tion and in Commercial Education upon the completion of 132 semes- 
ter hours with at least 132 quality points. It is also given to those 
students who complete the Soloist Course in the Conservatory of 
Music. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Music Education is awarded 
to those students who complete the public school music courses pre- 
scribed for this degree in the Conservatory of Music. 

Credits accepted toward graduation shall be subject to certain 
limitations. Not more than a total of 27 credits may be acquired by 
extension, correspondence, and examination, as follows : 

a. Credits by extension are limited to six. 

b. Credits by correspondence are limited to six. 

c. Credits by examination are limited to fifteen. 

Each student will be responsible for keeping his own yearly record 
of the fulfillment of his graduation requirements, so that he may 
know at all times where he stands. Although the office will keep the 
record also and advise the student concerning it, ultimate failure to 
meet any graduation requirement will be the student's responsibility. 

HONORS AT GRADUATION 

Seniors having an average of 2.75 to 3.00 quality points per 
semester hour during their college careers are graduated summa cum 
laude. Those with an average of 2.50 to 2.74 quality points per 
semester hour are graduated magna cum laude. Those with an aver- 
age of 2.25 to 2.49 quality points per semester hour are graduated 
cum laude. Honors are announced at the commencement exercises. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 53 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

Freshmen will be given sophomore ranking upon the completion 
of thirty semester hours with as many quality points. Sophomores 
will become juniors upon the completion of sixty-four semester hours, 
with sixty-four quality points. Juniors will become seniors upon 
the completion of ninety-eight semester hours with ninety-eight 
quality points. 

STATEMENT OF CREDITS 

Upon graduation or upon withdrawal before graduation, a stu- 
dent is entitled to one certified statement of his college credits. A 
fee of one dollar is charged for each additional certificate. 

MINIMUM RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS 

To be eligible for graduation, a student must complete the mini- 
mum residence requirements: 

(1) Not less than two semesters immediately preceding gradua- 
tion and covering a minimum of 30 credits, or 

(2) Not less than 30 weeks of full-time residence in summer ses- 
sions covering a minimum of 30 credits. The 30 weeks and 30 
credits, constituting the last year of work in residence immediately 
preceding graduation, must be completed within a period of seven 
years beginning with the date of enrollment in the first summer 
session in question. 

REPORTS 

Reports of students doing unsatisfactory or failing work are made 
to the office at intervals during the semester. Whenever a student 
does unsatisfactory or failing work in two or more subjects, he will 
be asked to confer with the dean or adviser and a notice will be sent 
to the parent or guardian. Final reports of the work of each student 
are sent to the parent or guardian at the end of each semester. 

ATTENDANCE REGULATIONS 

Students are expected to attend all classes for which they have 
registered and all chapel services. Absences are counted from the 
first recitation in each course. Ten absences from classes during a 
semester are allowed a student. Absence from a class period twenty- 
four hours before or after a vacation or a holiday will count double. 
An unavoidable absence should be covered by an acceptable excuse 
which must be filed in the office not later than one week after the end 
of the period of absence. 

For each unexcused absence in excess of ten, one-fifth of a semes- 
ter hour of credit shall be deducted from the student's total number 



64 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERS1TI 

of semester hours of credit for that semester. A student who has 
incurred three times as many absences in a course as there are sem- 
ester hours of credit for that course may, at the option of the in- 
structor in consultation with the dean of the college, be dropped from 
that course. 

For every three unexcused chapel absences, one-fifth of a semes- 
ter hour shall be deducted from the student's total number of semester 
hours for that semester. 

DEAN'S HONOK LIST 

Following each semester examination period, the names of stu- 
dents who have made very high averages for that period will be 
announced by the Dean of the College. Students on the Dean's 
Honor List will be excused from the ordinary attendance regulations 
governing class recitations. They will not be excused from chapel, 
private lesson appointments, and announced recitations or tests. 

THE ACADEMIC YEAK 

As long as returning veterans need to be accommodated, the col- 
lege year will be divided into two long terms of sixteen weeks each 
and one summer term of eight weeks. For the opening and closing 
dates of these terms see the college calendar on pages 5 and <i. Non- 
veterans will be accepted in the summer term. 




COURSE REC^UIREMENTS'^]^ 



BACHELOK OF ARTS 

Susquehanna is primarily a liberal arts college. As such, it seeks 
to give a rich cultural training to its liberal arts students. During 
the first two years of college the student should lay broad foundations 
in the general cultural courses so that in his junior and senior years 
he may work on the more specialized programs required for the 
various professions. 

The course requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree in semes- 
ter hours are as follows : English, 12 hrs. ; Foreign Language, 12 
hrs. ; Science (Science Survey, Chemistry, Physics, Biology) or 
Mathematics, 12 hrs. ; History of Western Europe, 6 hrs. ; American 
History, 6 hrs. ; Bible and Religion, 8 hrs. ; Psychology, 6 hrs. ; 
Personal Hygiene and Physical Education, 8 hrs. These required 
courses total 70 semester hours. In addition, the student will choose 
elective courses in his major and minor fields to bring the grand 
total required for graduation up to 132 semester hours. 

A suggested program of work for the first two years of the liberal 
arts course is as follows : 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 

English Comp. & Library Sc. _ 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 

History of Western Europe — 3 

Bible 2 

Personal Hygiene 1 

Physical Education 1 



16 



Second Semester 

English Composition 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 

History of Western Europe — 3 

Bible 2 

Personal Hygiene 1 

Physical Education 1 



16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



English Literature — 3 

Christian Philosophy 2 

Foreign Language 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 

General Psychology 3 

American History 3 

Physical Education 1 



18 



English Literature 3 

Ethics 2 

Foreign Language 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 

Educational or Applied 

Psychology 3 

American History 3 

Physical Education 1 



18 



55 



56 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

In the junior and senior years the student will complete any gen- 
eral course requirements still outstanding and specialize in the major 
and minor fields of his own choosing. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
(Business Administration) 

The Bachelor of Science degree is awarded to those who finish the 
four-year course in Business Administration. 

The general course requirements in Business Administration in 
terms of semester hours are English, 9 hrs. ; American Government, 
6 hrs. ; American History or Sociology, 6 hrs. ; Bible and Religion, 
8 hrs. ; General Psychology, 3 hrs. ; Science or Mathematics, 6 hrs. ; 
Personal Hygiene and Physical Education, 8 hrs. 

The required general courses total 46 semester hours. In addi- 
tion to this, 20 semester hours must be elected in the field of general 
education, and 66 semester hours are required in the field of business 
and economics. This makes a total of 132 semester hours, the num- 
ber required for graduation. 

The 66 hours which are required in Business Administration and 
Economics must include the following : Principles of Economics, 6 
hrs.; Economic Geography, 3 hrs.; Business Mathematics, 3 hrs.; 
Business English, 3 hrs. ; Statistics, 3 hrs. ; Accounting, 6 hrs. ; Busi- 
ness Law, 6 hrs. ; Investments, 3 hrs. ; Business Management, 3 hrs. ; 
and 30 additional hours elected from courses in Business Administra- 
tion and Economics. 

Students planning to enter the fields of accounting, salesmanship, 
personnel guidance, Federal Civil Service, or other specialized fields 
of business, should arrange their electives in consultation with the 
head of the department. 

The program for the first two years of the Business Administra- 
tion Course is as follows: 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First Semester Second Semester 

English Comp. & Library Sc. _ 3 English Composition 3 

Business Mathematics 3 Economic Geography 3 

Elementary Accounting 3 Elementary Accounting 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 Science or Mathematics 3 

Business Law 3 Business Law 3 

Personal Hygiene 1 Personal Hygiene 1 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

H .17 




STEELE SCIENCE HALL 



COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 67 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First Semester Second Semester 

English Literature 3 Business English 3 

Bible 2 Bible 2 

American History or Sociology 3 American History or Sociology 3 

Economics 21 3 Economics 22 3 

General Psychology 3 Elective* 6 

Elective* 3 Physical Education 1 

Physical Education 1 — 

— 13 
18 

In the junior and senior years, the student will complete any 
general course requirements still outstanding and will specialize in 
Business Administration courses and allied fields. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
(Commercial Education) 

The Bachelor of Science degree is awarded to those who finish 
the four-year course in Commercial Education. This curriculum 
permits its graduates to secure a College Provisional Certificate 
licensing them to teach the commercial subjects in Pennsylvania 
high schools.** 

The general course requirements for this degree in terms of 
semester hours are English, 12 hrs. ; Bible and Religion, 8 hrs. ; 
Science or Mathematics, 6 hrs. ; General Psychology, 3 hrs. ; Ameri- 
can History, 6 hrs. ; Principles of Economics, 6 hrs. ; American Gov- 
ernment, 6 hrs. ; Personal Hygiene and Physical Education, 8 hrs. 

These required courses total 55 semester hours. In addition the 
student will follow courses in Commercial Education to bring the 
grand total to 132 semester hours, required for graduation. 

The program for the Commercial Education course is as follows : 

FRESHMAN YEAR 
First Semester Second Semester 

English Comp. & Library Sc. _ 3 English Composition 3 

Economic Geography 11 3 Business Mathematics 3 

Business Law 3 Business Law 3 

Elementary Shorthand*** 3 Intermediate Shorthand 3 

Elementary Typing*** 2 Intermediate Typing 2 

Personal Hygiene 1 Personal Hygiene 1 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

16 16 



♦Intermediate Accounting is recommended as an elective. 
•♦Courses may be elected to help meet the requirements of other states, but because 
of the great differences between Pennsylvania requirements in Commercial Education and 
those of nearby states it is not possible to meet all of the out-of-state requirements in a 
four-year curriculum designed for Pennsylvania. 

***Studenta who have completed the equivalent of these elementary courses in the 
high school will not register for typing and shorthand until the second semester, and 
will then be privileged to graduate with a minimum of 6 hrs. of typing, and 9 hrs. of 
shorthand. 



58 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



First Semester 



Second Semester 



English Literature 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 

General Psychology 3 

Elementary Accounting 3 

Intermediate Shorthand 3 

Intermediate Typing 2 

Physical Education 1 



English Literature 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 

Economic Geography 22 3 

Elementary Accounting 3 

Advanced Shorthand 3 

Advanced Typing 2 

Physical Education 1 



18 

JUNIOR YEAR 



18 



First Semester 

American History 3 

Principles of Economics 3 

Intermediate Accounting 3 

Introduction to Education 3 

Shorthand and Typing Methods 2 

Bible 2 

Physical Education 1 



17 



Second Semester 

American History 3 

Principles of Economics 3 

Intermediate Accounting* 3 

Educational Psychology 3 

Business English 3 

Bible ___'_ 2 

Physical Education 1 



18 



SENIOR YEAR 



First Semester 



Second Semester 



American Government 3 

Christian Philosophy 2 

Office Practice 3 

Business Curriculum 3"" 

Public Speaking » 3 

Elective** 2 



16 



American Government 3 

Ethics 2 

Bookkeeping Teaching Methods 2 

Practice Teaching 6 



13 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MUSIC EDUCATION 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Music Education is awarded 
to those students who complete 133 semester hours in the Conservatory 
of Music in the curriculum which has been approved by the State 
Council on Education for the preparation of supervisors and teachers 
of public school music in Pennsylvania. See pages 102-103 for details. 



♦Machine Accounting may be substituted. 
"Two or three hours may be elected. Salesmanship should be elected if the student 
wishes this subject included on his Pennsylvania teaching certificate. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



The courses with odd numbers are given during the first semester, 
and those with even numbers are given during the second semester. 
Courses open primarily to freshmen are numbered eleven to twenty 
inclusive; to sophomores, twenty-one to thirty inclusive; to juniors, 
thirty-one to forty inclusive; and to seniors upwarct from forty-one. 



AKT 

Mr. Meader 

32 Introduction to Art 

An introductory survey course in the forms and history of art as 
an expression of man's cultural development. Art as an ethnic 
phenomenon is studied, together with the basic principles governing 
its creative processes. Required of Public School Music students. 
Three hours. Three credits. 

33 Art Appreciation — Ancient and Medieval 

A general survey of sculpture, painting and architecture in 
Ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Asia Minor, Greece, Italy, and North- 
ern Europe. The most important factors that have influenced the 
arts (religious beliefs; social, economic, and political factors; geog- 
raphy and climate) will be studied. The purpose of this course is to 
supply an elementary equipment for critical appreciation and the 
development of artistiq taste. 
Two hours. Two credits. 

34 Art Appreciation — Renaissance Through Modern Times 

A survey course designed to introduce the student to the history 
of painting, sculpture, and allied arts from the Renaissance to the 
present. The various schools of painting in Italy are studied, to- 
gether with the works of the master artists of Holland, Belgium, 
Spain, France, Germany, England, and America down to the art of 
today. This course is designed to develop fundamental principles of 
critical judgment. 
Two hours. Two credits. 

59 



60 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

BIBLE AND KELIGION 

Mr. Ahl 

Distinctive features of the church college are the development of 
Christian character and the training of its students to be leaders in 
the church and community. The specific objects of this department 
are, therefore, to help the student to appreciate the place of the Bible 
in education ; to give satisfying motivation for living, and power to 
face the problems of life. 



21 Old Testament 

This course acquaints the student with the records, history, cus- 
toms, laws and literature of the Hebrew people. Constant work with 
sources and collateral readings are required. 
Two hours. Two credits. 



22 New Testament 

The life and teaching of Christ are the natural center of this 
course. An intensive study is made of the Gospels and the Acts of 
the Apostles, with their religious and ethical implications, as well as 
their historical and biographical content. 
Two hours. Two credits. 



31 Christian Philosophy 

A study of the origin, purposiveness of the universe and of man 
in the light of Christian truth, together with an interpretation of 
religious phenomena. Intended to help the student to a constructive 
solution of the ultimate problems of religious belief. 

Two hours. Two credits. 



32 Christian Ethics 

A study of the beginnings and growth of morality, the theories of 
moral life, its relation to religion, and the application of these theories 
in the modern world of moral action. This course covers the moral 
responsibilities in a democratic society as they apply in individual 
and group relations, emphasizing the stabilizing effect of loyalty to 
Jesus in all relationships of life. 
Two hours. Two credits. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 61 

33 Apostolic Period 

In this study, Apostolic Christianity is presented as it is set forth 
in the Acts of the Apostles and in the Epistles of the New Testament, 
in such a manner as to give a clear view of the historic situation in 
the Roman and Jewish world of the first century in which Christi- 
anity had to gain a foothold. 

Two hours. Two credits 



35 Social Teachings of Jesus 

In search for a solution of the modern problems of society in 
political, institutional, civic and domestic spheres, the attention of 
the student is directed to the Master-Teacher, and to His chosen 
disciples who gave expression in their writings to His principles of 
social behaviour. 

Two hours. Two credits 



36 Comparative Religion 

The various religions are studied to discover the elements that are 
fundamental in all religious thinking and which point to a divine 
origin of religion itself. The Christian religion is presented as the 
absolute religion which satisfies the whole man in all his needs and 
which reveals these fundamentals in such a way as to be adapted to 
all races of mankind. 
Two hours. Two credits. 



BIOLOGY 

Mr. Scudder 

Premedical requirements 

Premedical students will satisfy the regular college requirements 
for the major and minor from the fields of biology and chemistry. 
Organic chemistry and at least one year of physics and one year of 
mathematics must be included. 

Biology majors and minors 

The major consists of courses 21-22, 31-32 and electives to make 
24 semester hours, together with one year each of two of the follow- 
ing: chemistry, physics and mathematics, as supporting courses. 
One of these fields should be chosen for the minor. 

The minor consists of courses 21-22 and electives to make 18 
semester hours, together with at least one year's work from the 
following: chemistry, physics, mathematics. 



62 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

11-12 Botany 

A study of structure and physiology in higher plants with a con- 
sideration of typical life histories of flowering plants, conifers, ferns, 
mosses, fungi and algae. 

Two recitations and one three-hour laboratory period throughout the 
year. Six credits. 



21-22 Zoology 

A survey of the principal groups of animals from the standpoint 
of structure, physiology, the life cycle and biological theory. 

Two recitations and one three-hour laboratory period throughout the 
year. Six credits. 



31-32 Comparative Anatomy 

Both phylogeny and ontogeny are considered in interpreting the 
adult structure of vertebrates. The dogfish, Necturus, and the cat 
are dissected in the laboratory. Prerequisite, Course 21-22. 

Two recitations and one three-hour laboratory period throughout the 
year. Six credits. 



33 Bacteriology 

The classification, structure and physiology of microorganisms 
and their importance in nature and in disease are discussed. Bacteri- 
ological methods are emphasized in the laboratory. Prerequisite. 
Course 11-12 or 21-22. 
Two recitations and one three-hour laboratory period. Three credits. 



35 Heredity 

A study of the manner in which characteristics are transmitted 
from one generation to the next, with a discussion of the application 
of hereditary principles to the improvement of the human race. 
Prerequisite, Course 11-12 or 21-22. 
Three recitations. Three credits. 



41-42 Histology 

A study of the microscopic anatomy of the tissues and organs of 
mammals with a consideration of methods of preparing animal tis- 
sues for microscopic study. Prerequisites, Courses 21-22 and 31-32, 
but may accompany 31-32. Alternates with 43 and 46. 
One recitation and six hours of laboratory. Six credits. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 63 

43 Embryology 

The development of chordates is studied by a brief review of con- 
ditions in Amphioxus and the frog, followed by a fuller consideration 
of young chick embryos. A textbook, whole mounts and serial sec- 
tions are used. Prerequisites, Courses 21-22 and 31-32, but may 
accompany 31-32. Alternates with 41-42. 

One recitation and six hours of laboratory. Three credits. 



46 Physiology 

A study of the manner in which the tissues and organs of the body 
perform their functions. Prerequisites, Courses 21-22 and 31-32, 
but may accompany 31-32. Alternates with 41-42. 

Three recitations. Three credits. 

48 Seminar 

An informal course primarily for majors. A variety of biological 
topics will be discussed or assigned for special reports. Special in- 
terests of individual students will be considered. Given as required. 

One or two recitations. One credit. 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION* 

10 Business Mathematics 

A study of the mathematics of business with special attention to 
short methods of computation. The course includes a review of frac- 
tions, decimals, percentage, profit and loss problems, aliquot parts, 
aK$«l bills. A mastery of interest, bank discount, insurance, taxes and 
)ther allied problems is required of the students. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Strathmeyer 

11-12 Elementary Accounting 

An introductory course emphasizing basic accounting principles 
and their applications. Original entries, the technique and classi- 
fication of accounts, adjusting and closing entries, and work sheets; 
controlling accounts, departmental trading accounts, depreciation and 
reserve accounts; and related subjects. In the second semester, 
special attention is given to elementary accounting as applied to 
partnerships and corporations, and as applied to manufacturing ac- 



*Also see courses listed under Commercial Education and Economics. 



64 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

counting and to the construction, analysis and interpretation of 

simple financial statements. 

Three hours recitation and two hours laboratory. Six credits. 

Mr. Strath meyer 

13-14 Business Law 

A study of the law as it relates to property and business, which 
considers the following : essential elements of a contract, agency, em- 
ployer and employee, negotiable instruments, suretyship, insurance, 
bailments, carriers, sales, partnerships, corporations, deeds of con- 
veyance, mortgages, landlord and tenant, wills, guardians, and rights 
in property which result from domestic relations. Some attention is 
given to torts, business crimes, and legal procedure. 
Three hours throughout the year. Three credits. Mr. Graham 

20 Machine Accounting 

A course in the basic operating techniques of office machines and 
their application to accounting procedures. Particular attention is 
given to adding, calculating, and posting machines, class exercises 
and laboratory work. 
One hour lecture, two hours laboratory. Three credits. 

Mr. Strath meyer 

21 Intermediate Accounting 

Advanced corporation accounting, with emphasis on procedures 
in manufacturing accounting; computation of annuities; accounting 
principles relating to cash, receivables, and inventories. Laboratory 
problems. 
Three hours recitation and two hours laboratory. Three credits. 

Mr. Strath meyer 

22 Intermediate Accounting 

Accounting principles relating to the classification and valuation 
of tangible and intangible assets, and liabilities; accounting for in- 
vestments; funds and reserves; and comparative statements. In- 
troduction to C. P. A. problems. 
Three hours recitation and two hours laboratory. Three credits. 

Mr. Strath meyer 

24 Business English 

A course in writing correct and effective business letters, reports, 
articles, and other forms of business communications. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Kleinsorg 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 65 

25 Mathematics of Finance 

The mathematical theory underlying interest, annuities, deprecia- 
tion, mortality, insurance, and investments. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Robison 

30 Advertising 

A study of the functions, principles, and applications of adver- 
tising. It includes copy writing, layouts, and other factors in the 
preparation of advertisements; advertising media; advertising re- 
search; the economic significance of advertising; and related topics. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Graham 

31 Salesmanship 

Principles and problems of salesmanship. A study is made of 
such subjects as the selling process, character and personality as 
related to salesmanship, and principles, methods, and concrete prob- 
lems of salesmanship. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Graham 

32 Personnel Management 

The course includes a study of the following: the development of 
personnel management, instruments of personnel control, education 
and training of the workers and the supervisory force, employee in- 
centives, industrial democracy and social controls, and special prob- 
lems in industrial relations. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Graham 

34 Advanced Business Law 

A course in business law intended for those who plan to enter the 
field of accounting, with a general review of principles of contracts, 
sales, and agency, and an intensive study of the law in special fields, 
such as negotiable instruments, partnerships, corporations, bankrupt- 
cy, and real property. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Graham 

35 Advanced Accounting 

Accounting theory and problems in relationship to such subjects 
as estates and trust funds, receiverships, bankruptcy, corporation 
consolidations, and advanced forms of financial statements and their 
interpretation. C. P. A. problems. 
Three recitation hours, two laboratory hours. Three credits 

Mr. Strath meyer 



66 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

37 Cost Accounting 

Accumulation and analysis of cost data and their uses; control 
of materials, labor, and manufacturing expense; standard costs, 
budgetary controls, and related problems. 
Three recitation hours, two laboratory hoiirs. Three credits. 

Mr. Strath meyer 

39 Statistical Methods 

Methods of analyzing and presenting numerical data, with refer- 
ence to probability, averages, and measures of correlation. 
Three hdairs. Three credits. Mr. RobiSON 

40 Business Management 

A study of scientific business management. It includes a consid- 
eration of problems of organization, the plant and its location, factory 
efficiency, labor efficiency, cost analysis, coordination of factory oper- 
ations, and related topics. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Graham 

41 Auditing 

Duties and responsibilities of an auditor; kinds of audits; audit 
practice, procedure, and reports. Audit practice cases. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Graham 

42 Federal Tax Accounting 

A study of the Federal Income Tax Law and Regulations cover- 
ing taxable income of individuals, partnerships, estates, trusts, and 
corporations. A brief study is also made of social security taxes, 
and estate and gift taxes. Practical problems and preparation of 
returns. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. GRAHAM 



\ 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 67 

CHEMISTRY 

The requirements for a major in chemistry are 24 hours of 
chemistry supported by 12 hours of mathematics, 8 hours of intro- 
ductory physics, and 6 hours of biology! Courses 11, 12, and other 
courses to make 18 semester hours are required for a minor, sup- 
ported by 12 hours of math ematics. 

Mr. Houtz 

11 General Chemistbt 

A study of the occurrence, preparation, properties and uses of 
nonmetallic elements and their chief compounds. The fundamentals 
of chemistry are stressed. Students who have not submitted entrance 
credits in chemistry will comprise the first section. Section two is 
designed for those who have submitted satisfactory entrance credits 
in this subject. 
Two recitation hours, two to three laboratory hours. Three credits. 

12 General Chemistry 

The chemistry of the atmosphere and nitrogen and some of their 
most important relations are considered. The occurrence, metallurgy, 
properties and uses of the metallic elements are studied ; a brief 
introduction to the chemistry of the carbon compounds is included. 
Two recitation hours, two to three laboratory hours. Three credits. 

21 Qualitative Analysis 

The principles of analysis are studied by considering the reactions 
of known metals. The writing of chemical equations, using ionic 
equations is emphasized. The determination of metals in alloys and 
compounds is required. 
Two recitation hours, two to six laboratory hours. Three or four credits. 

22 Qualitative Analysis 

After a knowledge of the principles and methods of analysis of 
compound substances and mixtures has been obtained, students are 
required to determine at least twenty-five unknown mixtures of 
natural and manufactured products. 

Two recitation hours, three to six laboratory hours. Three or four 
credits. 

31 Organic Chemistry 

The alipathic compounds, comprising the saturated and the un- 
saturated carbon compounds, are considered. The reactions involved 



68 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

in their preparation, including the writing of chemical equations, are 
stressed. Detailed methods are used, and reactions involved in all 
laboratory work are required. Prerequisites, 11 and 12. 

Two recitation hours, four to six laboratory hours. Four credits. 

32 Organic Chemistry 

The cyclic compounds, comprising the alicyclic and aromatic com- 
pounds, are considered. Special attention is given to their prepara- 
tion, characteristics and uses. Critical reports of all laboratory work 
are required. Prerequisites, 11, 12 and 31. 
Two recitation hours, four to six laboratory hours. Four credits. 

41 Quantitative Analysis 

Standard solutions are prepared. Determinations by neutrali- 
zations in alkalimetry and acidimetry, oxidation and reduction are 
made. Typical known substances are used to acquire knowledge of 
principles of analysis. This is followed by the analysis of compounds 
including iron ores, water, limestones, and alloys. 

Two recitation hours, three to six laboratory hours. Three or four 
credits. 

42 Quantitative Analysis 

Principles and methods of gravimetric analysis are studied. 
Determinations of copper, barium, sulphate, calcium, silver, chlorine, 
aluminum, potassium, magnesium, phosphates, carbonates, and car- 
bon dioxide are made. Copper, silver, and alloys are determined by 
electroanalysis. 

Two recitation hours, three to six laboratory hours. Three or four 
credits. 



43-44 Physical Chemistry 

The object of the course is to give a theoretical reason for the 
statements underlying previous studies in chemistry. With this as a 
background, there are then given the gas laws, elementary thermo- 
dynamics, radio-activity, atomic structure, X-rays, solutions, colloids, 
heterogeneous and homogeneous reactions. A laboratory course par- 
allels the lectures and recitations. Prerequisites, 11, 12, 21, 22. 

Two recitation hours, and two to four laboratory hours throughout the 
year. Six to eight credits. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 69 

COMMERCIAL EDUCATION* 

15-16 Typewriting 

Instruction and mastery of the keyboard. The mechanical fea- 
tures of the typewriter. Letter writing, tabulation, and the prepara- 
tion of business papers. 

Five hours first semester, four hours second semester. Four credits. 

Miss Allison 

17-18 Gregg Shorthand 

Instruction in the principles of shorthand. Emphasis on both 
reading and writing. Dictation and transcription of practiced 
letters. 

Five hours first semester, three hours second semester. Six credits. 

Miss Allison 

19 Medical Aid and Simple Nursing Techniques 

This course includes the Standard Red Cross Eirst Aid and Home 
Nursing techniques. It is designed to aid the medical secretary in 
dealing with emergencies, and to provide a background of knowledge 
in sickroom procedure, mental and physical hygiene, and sanitation. 
Two hours. One credit. Miss Hein 

20 Medical Terminology 

A study of the prefixes, suffixes, abbreviations, and definitions of 
medical terms is the basis of this course. The student learns the 
vocabulary of medical, anatomical, pathological and scientific terms, 
and studies the derivation and correct spelling and pronunciation of 
these terms. 
Two hours. One credit. Miss Hein 

24 Business English 

A course in writing correct and effective business letters, reports, 
articles, and other forms of business communications. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Kleinsorg 

25-26 Typewriting 

Prerequisite : Commercial Education 16. Perfecting and making 
permanent the skill established in the first year. Speed and ac- 
curacy emphasized. Practice in the writing of manuscripts, legal 
papers, stenciling, business letters, and papers. 
Four hours throughout the year. Four credits. Miss Allison 



*A1so see courses in Business Administration and Economics. 



70 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

27-28 Gkegg Shorthand 

Prerequisite: Commercial Education 16 and 18. Advanced 
work in shorthand. Dictation and transcription of business letters, 
technical matter, and radio addresses. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. Miss Allison 

29-30 Medical Shorthand 

Prerequisite: Commercial Education 26 and 28. A study of 
technical medical terminology; prefixes and suffixes, phrases, and 
special outlines. Dictation and transcription of technical material. 
Not offered in 1947-48. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits Miss Allison 

33 Medical Ethics and Office Procedure 

This course is given for medical secretarial students. The aim is 
to provide an understanding of office and hospital ethics, the relation 
of the doctor and the patient, the various specialties in the field of 
medicine, and the business side of a doctor's office dealing with such 
aspects as records, fees, accounts, the doctor and the law, and liability 
and insurance. 
Two hours. Two credits. Miss Hein 

37 Shorthand and Typewriting Methods 

Prerequisite : Commercial Education 26 and 28. A critical 
study of objectives, psychological laws underlying skills, organiza- 
tion of materials, tests, and standards of achievement. Special 
attention is given to the different methods of teaching shorthand and 
typewriting. The student is given practice in drawing up lesson 
plans and teaching. 
Two hours. Two credits. Miss Allison 

39 Office Practice 

Prerequisite: Commercial Education 26 and 28. A general over- 
view of the function of the office in modern business. A systematic 
coverage of office routines. The uses and operating principles of 
various office machines. 
Three hours. Three credits. Miss Allison 

41 Medical Office Practice 

The practical aspect of the demands on a medical secretary, the 
use of office equipment, sterilization, care and preparation of instru- 
ments. The student learns the use of the clinical thermomi 
sphygmomanometer; and other simple techniques, such ;i- chemical 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 71 

urine analysis, and preparation for examination and minor opera- 
tions. This course includes some practical experience in this work. 

Two hours. Two credits. Miss Hein 

42 Bookkeeping Teaching Methods 

Objectives and methods in the teaching of bookkeeping and re- 
lated subjects in the high school. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Graham 

43 The Commercial Curriculum 

A comprehensive treatment of the commercial curriculum of the 
secondary school. Such topics as the origin and development of the 
commercial curriculum, constructive criticisms of existing curricula, 
cardinal principles of commercial education, the curriculum and 
local conditions, construction of curricula, and the curricula of today 
will be studied. Lectures, reference assignments, and reports. 

Three hours. Three credits Miss Allison 

45-46 Practice Teaching (See Education) 



ECONOMICS 

Courses 21, 22, 32, 35, 37, Business Administration 39, and six 
hours selected from other approved Economics courses are required 
for a major. Courses 21, 22, 35, 37, and six hours selected from 
approved Economics courses are required for a minor. 

11 Economic Geography 

A study of the regional distribution of the world's industries, 
resources, and population with emphasis on points of special value 
to students of Business Administration. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Zagars 

21-22 Principles of Economics 

A study of the existing economic order and basic economic prin- 
ciples and problems. With reference to goods and services, it deals 
with production, value and price, exchange, distribution, consumption 
and saving, and income and expenditures of government. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. Mr. 




72 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

23 Economic Geography of North America 

Industries and resources of North America, their regional dis- 
tribution, their effect upon the standards of living in the United 
States, and their importance to the rest of the world. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Zagars 

27 Labor Problems 

This is a study of labor problems from the viewpoint of the 
laborer, the employer, and the public. Recent laws will be considered 
relating to social insurance, pensions, wages, and child and woman 
labor. Special consideration will be given to labor organizations 
and their activities. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Zagars 

28 Insurance 

This course deals with the economic and social values, the impor- 
tant principles and practices, and the principal legal phases, of each 
of the common forms of insurance. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Zagars 

32 Economic History of the United States 

A study of the history of manufacturing, agriculture, transporta- 
tion, communication, banking, internal and foreign commerce and 
related topics, within the United States. (Same as History 41.) 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Russ 

35 Money and Banking 

A study of the nature, functions, principles, and problems of 
money, credit, and banking. Special attention will be given to price 
levels, industrial depressions, international exchange, and government 
regulation of money and banking. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Zagars 

37 Investments 

A study of stocks, bonds, real estate, mortgages, and annuities. 
As related to investments, it includes a consideration of objectives, 
institutions, sources of information, media, analysis of risks and 
returns, and other subjects. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Graham 

38 Marketing 

A study of the principles and practices involved in moving goods 
from the various producers to the consumers. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Strath meyer 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION ' 73 

44 Consumer Economics 

A study of economic principles from the point of view of the 
consumer. The main objective is to point the way toward wiser 
practices for the consumer. The course includes such topics as stand- 
ards of living, intelligent buying, savings and investments, and laws 
in behalf of the consumer. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Graham 

46 Foreign Trade 

A study of the theoretical and practical problems involved in the 
sale of goods across national and economic boundaries. A survey 
will be made of world trade resources, markets and exchange prob- 
lems. (Prerequisite: Money and Banking). 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Zagars 

47 History of Economic Thought 

Development of economic concepts and schools of economic 
thought from earliest times. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Zagars 

48 Comparative Economic Systems 

A comparative study of present economic, political, and social 
doctrines of the free enterprise system, socialism, communism, and 
fascism, with particular attention to the Soviet Union and the 
United States. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Zagars 



EDUCATION 

The requirements for certification to teach in the high schools are 
as follows : v 

Pennsylvania: I. Completion of an approved four-year college degree. 
II. Eighteen semester hours in approved professional education distri- 
buted as follows: Introduction to Education (3), Educational Psycholo- 
gy (3), Practice Teaching (6), and 6 hours elective from History of 
Education, Techniques of High School Teaching, Secondary Education, 
Special Methods, and Visual Education. General Psychology is a pre- 
requisite to Educational Psychology. The Special Methods course must 
be in the field of either the major or minor. III. The academic subjects 
require a major of twenty-four semester hours and a minor of eighteen 
semester hours. For the special requirements in Commercial Education 
and Public School Music see pages 57 and 102 respectively. 

New Jersey: I. Basic for all certificates are (a) for academic sub- 
jects, English, 12 semester hours; social sciences, 12; science, 6; (b) 
for commercial education or music, a total of 30 credits in English, social 



74 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

studies, and science. II. Approved professional education distributed as 
follows: health education, 3 semester hours; educational psychology, 3; 
aims and organization of secondary education (principles), 3; principles 
and techniques (general methods), 3; curricula and courses of study 
(special methods), 3; elective, 3; practice teaching and observation, 150 
clock hours. III. Special courses and experience required in the techni- 
cal fields; in academic subjects, 30 credits in the major field, 18 hours in 
a minor, or 12 in each of two or more minors. 

New York: I. Completion of an approved four-year curriculum lead- 
ing to the baccalaureate degree. Thirty credits of advanced work be- 
yond the baccalaureate required for the license to teach academic sub- 
jects. This additional work is not required for a license to teach tech- 
nical subjects. II. Professional requirements are elastic, as follows: 
general and special methods, 4 to 8 semester hours; educational psychol- 
ogy, 2 to 6 hours; history, principles, problems, philosophy of education, 
2 to 6 hours; practice teaching academic subjects, 2 to 6 hours. A mini- 
mum total of 18 semester hours is required. III. A minimum of 18 
semester hours is required in each special academic field to be taught. 
Thirty-six semester hours are required in each of the technical fields. 

Those who are planning to teach must declare their intention at the 
end of the sophomore year and meet the qualifications of the Committee 
on Teacher Education. 

The college is set up to meet the requirements for teaching in the State 
of Pennsylvania. Basically these are also acceptable in other states, 
especially for those preparing to teach the academic subjects in high 
schools. However, in Commercial Education and Public School Music 
such highly specialized requirements prevail in some other states that it 
has been found impossible to meet all of these requirements in a four-year 
curriculum designed primarily for Pennsylvania. 

23 Introduction to Education 

An orientation course for all who have signified their intentions 
to become teachers. The evolution of our educational system, teach- 
ing problems, the learning process, the curriculum, changing concep- 
tions of education. School visitation, with written report of observa- 
tions, required of each student. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mb. Galt 

24 Educational Psychology 

A study of the laws, characteristics, and economy of the learning 
process with applications to school subjects. General psychology is 
a prerequisite. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Waterbury 

31 History and Principlks <>i Kuucation 

A study of the historical developments of education from the early 
beginnings to the present day. Special emphasis on the origin and 
development of American educational institutions. A study o\' pres- 
ent day tendencies and practices. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Waterbury 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 76 

32 Techniques of High School Teaching 

The principles underlying the selection and organization of sub- 
ject matter, and the development of skills, habits, ideals and attitudes 
in connection with the various school subjects. Principles that should 
guide the teacher in controlling conduct and building character. 
Each student will be required to teach a demonstration lesson in the 
presence of the instructor and the members of the class. 
Three hours. Three credits. Required of all liberal arts juniors en- 
tering teaching. Mr. Galt 

33 Secondary Education 

A study of the nature of the growth and development of the physi- 
cal, mental, emotional, moral, and religious life of the pupils begin- 
ning with childhood and extending through adolescence with the 
necessary educational implications. The place of the school in the 
life of the pupil. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Waterbury 

44 Visual Education 

Study of audio-visual and other sensory aids in education. Lab- 
oratory work in the use of objects, specimens, graphs, charts, maps, 
pictures, the stereograph, the opaque projector, the film slide, and 
silent and sound motion picture projectors. Offered only in summer 
term. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Galt 

45-46 Practice Teaching 

Observation and practice teaching in the public high schools. Ob- 
servation, conferences, reports, lesson plans, and teaching. A 
laboratory fee is charged. 

Six credits. Mrs. Giauque 

Mr. Waterbury 



47-48 Methods in Specific Subjects 

Courses in teaching methods are offered by the various depart- 
ments as required by the curricula of the students. In the Liberal 
Arts course these are elective, but in the Commercial Education and 
Public School Music courses they are required. 

f&ftiMEtsz 

50 Philosophy and Techniques of P er s onal Work 

A course designed to outline the broad scope of personnel work 
with emphasis given to the functions of the counselor, techniques 
employed, and other aspects of the work for the purpose of orienting 
the counselor to the many ramifications of personnel work. Special 



76 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

emphasis will be given to the work of the counselor and teacher- 
counselor as related to student personnel work in the secondary school. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mrs. Wells 



ENGLISH 

Courses 21, 22, 31, 32, 41, 42, and additional hours chosen from 
Courses 33, 34, 35, 36, 43, and 44 to total twenty-four hours are 
required for a major in English literature. Courses 21, 22, 31, 32, 
41, 42, and additional hours chosen from Courses 33, 34, 35, 36, 43, 
and 44 to total eighteen hours are required for a minor in English 
literature. Courses 1, 2 (or 11, 12) and 21, 22 are required for the 
necessary twelve hours of English. 

A minor in English composition (as distinguished from English 
literature) may be obtained by taking courses 11, 12, 46 and addi- 
tional hours from Courses 23, 24, 25, 26, 28, and 38 to total eighteen 
hours. 

1-2 Fundamentals of English Grammar 

Freshmen whose basic knowledge of English is deficient, as shown 
by the testing program at matriculation, will be assigned to this 
course in the fundamentals of grammar. If the student makes suf- 
ficient progress in the first semester, he will be transferred to English 
12 for the second semester. May not be counted toward a major or a 
minor. 
Three recitation hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

Mr. Kleinsorg 

11-12 Composition 

A year course in the three forms of discourse : narration, descrip- 
tion, and exposition. The instruction aims to aid the student to 
express himself clearly and grammatically, and to correct any habit 
of slipshod, inaccurate thinking. 

Library Science is also a required part of Composition 1-2 or 
11-12 and is designed to acquaint the student with the basic library 
tools, through independent research. It consists of one hour a week 
for ten weeks during one semester, and for that semester it will count 
as one-fourth of the final grade in Composition or Fundamentals. 

May not be counted toward a major or a minor. 
Three recitation hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

Mr. Kleinsorg, Miss Kolpin, Mr. Meader, and Mr. Wilson 

21 Survey of English Literature and Language 

From the beginning to 1800. An historical study of the develop- 
ment of English literature in its various forms and movements, com- 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 77 

bined with a study of the English language, its origin, structure, 

relation to other languages, development, borrowings, and general 

history. 

Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Meader, Mr. Wilson 

22 Survey of English Literature and Language 

From 1800 to the present day. In manner and method, a con- 
tinuation of English 21. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Meader, Mr. Wilson 

23-24 Journalism 

An introduction to the business of conducting a newspaper, with 
specific practice in reporting, editorial writing, feature article writing, 
make-up, and other activities connected with the weekly appear- 
ance of the college newspaper. The Susquehanna. Open to freshmen, 
but credit given only in the three upper classes. 
One recitation hour throughout the year. Two credits. Mr. Wilson 

25-26 Debating 

The principles of public speaking. The activities of this course 
include organized intercollegiate debates at home and on other cam- 
puses. Open to freshmen, but credit given only in the three upper 
classes. (See Speech.) 
One recitation hour throughout the year. Two credits. Mr. Gilbert 

28 Public Speaking 

Emphasis on the practice of speaking in public, together with the 
content and composition of a speech. (See Speech.) 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Gilbert 



31 American Literature 

Erom the beginning to Henry James. An historical study of the 
various forms and movements of our native writing. Alternates with 
41. Given 1947-48. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Wilson 

32 American Literature 

Erom Henry James to the present day. A continuation of Eng- 
lish 31. Alternates with 42. Given 1947-48. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Wilson 



78 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

33 English Drama 

An historical survey of dramatic literature in England, not in- 
cluding the works of Shakespeare, with attention to European and 
American drama. Alternates with 35. Given 1947-48. 

Two hours. Two credits. MR. Wilson 



34 Contemporary Drama 

British, Continental, and American drama from Tbsen to the 
present day. Alternates with 36. Given 1947-48. 

Two hours. Two credits. MR. Wilson 

35 English Novel 

An historical development of the novel from its beginnings to 
the close of the nineteenth century, with particular emphasis on its 
development in England. Alternates with 33. Given 1946-47. 

Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Meader 

36 English Novel 

A study of a group of novels representative of phases of develop- 
ment in the contemporary British novel from Henry James to Vir- 
ginia Woolf. Alternates with 34. Given 1946-47. 

Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Meader 

38 Business English 

A course in writing correct and effective business letters, reports, 
articles, and other forms of business communications. 

Three hoxirs. Three credits. Mr. Kleinsorg 

41 Shakespeare 

Plays before 1600. Particular study of the comedies and his- 
tories, with a careful consideration of Shakespeare's workmanship. 
Alternates with 31. Given 1946-47. 

Two hours. Two credits. MR. WlLSON 

42 Shakespeare 

Plays after 1600. Particular study of the tragedies, through 
Shakespeare's manner and method of composition. Alternates with 
32. Given 1946-47. 

Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Wilson 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 79 

43 English Poetby 

From 1500 to 1798. An historical survey of poetry in England 
from the early Renaissance to the Romantic Movement. Given 
1946-47. 
Two hours. Two credits. mr. Wilson 

44 English Poetry 

Erom 1798 to the present day. A continuation of 43. Given 
1946-47. 

Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Wilson 

45 Methods 

A study concerned with the problems of teaching literature and 
composition in junior and senior high school. Required, in New 
York and New Jersey, for the certification of English teachers. 
Alternates with 43. Given 1947-48. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Wilson 

46 Advanced Composition 

The theory and practice of various forms of literary composition : 
feature articles, verse, drama, fiction, et altera. The course requires 
the student to compose original material of considerable length, in 
weekly assignments. Alternates with 44. Given 1947-48. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Wilson 



FRENCH 

Miss Kline 

Courses 45 and 46 and electives in advance of 11-12 to make a 
total of 24 hours are required for a major. 

Courses totaling 18 hours in advance of 11-12 are required for 
a minor. Students planning to teach should include courses 45 and 
46 in the 18 hours. 

Students choosing a French major are urged to elect a minor in 
another foreign language. It is also recommended that they elect 
related courses in history, art, philosophy, and other languages and 
literature. 

11-12 Elementary French 

A course in pronunciation, in the elements of grammar with oral 
and written exercises to illustrate their application, and in reading, 
writing and speaking simple French. For students who have had 
one year of French or no French in high School. May not be counted 
toward a major. 
Four hours throughout the year. Six credits. 



80 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

21-22 Intermediate French 

A careful review of grammar. Practice in speaking and writing 
French. Special emphasis on the reading of the short story and the 
drama. Prerequisite, French 11-12 or two years of high school 
French. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

31-32 French Literature of the 17th Century 

A study of the origin and development of French classicism with 
particular attention to comedy and tragedy. Lectures in French, 
collateral reading and discussion. Prerequisite: French 21-22. 
Alternates with French 43-44. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

41-42 French Literature of the 19th Century 

A study of Komanticism and Realism with special emphasis on 
the works of Lamartine, DeYigny, DeMusset, Hugo, Sand, Balzac, 
Flaubert, Zola, Daudet, Loti and Anatole France. Lectures in 
French, collateral reading and discussion. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

43-44 Survey of French Literature 

A study and comparison of the main currents of French literature 
from its inception to the present day. This course is designed chiefly 
for seniors majoring in French who wish to organize and synthesize 
their knowledge of French literature as a whole. Alternates with 
French 31-32. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

45-46 Advanced Composition and Conversation 

A course to enable the student to write and speak French as fluent- 
ly as possible. Includes a study of phonetic symbols, practice in 
pronunciation and drill in the use of common idioms. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 



GENERAL SCIENCE 

11-12 Science Survey 

The first semester's work includes a survey of the physical sciences 
with applications to modern life. The second semester's work in- 
cludes a survey of the biological sciences as aids in man's cultural 
development. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

Messrs. Hoover, Houtz, Scudder 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 81 

GERMAN 

Mr. Gilbert 

Courses 21, 22, 41, 42 and electives in advance of 11-12 to com- 
plete a total of 24 hours are required for a major. 

Courses 21, 22, 41, 42 and electives in advance of 11-12 to make 
a total of 18 hours are required for a minor. 

11-12 Beginning German 

A course in the minimum essentials of grammar to make possible 
a good reading knowledge of the language, including practice in 
simple conversation. Reading of simple stories with attention to 
their folklore, history, and characteristic atmosphere. May not be 
counted toward a major or minor. 
Three or four hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

21-22 Intermediate German 

Modern Novellen, poetry, and other works of medium difficulty 
will be read. Every effort will be made to increase the student's 
active vocabulary by means of composition and conversation. The 
reading of works outside the classroom aids in increasing the under- 
standing of printed German. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

31-32 German Drama of the 19th Century 

Emphasis will be placed upon romanticism, realism, and natural- 
ism, the characteristic literary attitudes of the period. The drama 
will be interpreted also as the outgrowth of the personality of such 
writers as Kleist, Grillparzer, Hebbel, "Wagner and Hauptmann. 
Alternates with 33-34. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

33-34 The German Novelle of the 19th Century 

The development of this form will be traced by the reading of 
important ISTovellen of each literary trend of the 19th century. 
Alternates with 31-32. Not given 1947-48. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

41-42 German Composition and Conversation 

A course to give the student an excellent working knowledge of 
German grammar, and to increase his ability to use the spoken and 
the written word. The work will be based largely on texts dealing 
with German life, history and art. 
Two hours throughout the year. Four credits. 



82 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

43-44 German Literature of the 18th Century 

Representative works of the period will be read to reveal the per- 
sonality of such writers as Lessing, Goethe and Schiller, and to show 
the development of sentimentalism, storm and stress, classicism and 
romanticism. Alternates with 45-46. 
Two hours throughout the year. Four credits. 

45-46 History of the German Language and Literature 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the develop- 
ment of the German language and literature. Middle High German 
will be studied and read to make the student conscious of linguistic 
changes. Through contact with works not read previously, the 
student gains a more comprehensive knowledge of German literature. 
Recommended only for majors. Alternates with 43-44. Not given 
1947-48. 
Two hours throughout the year. Four credits. 



GREEK Mr. Ahl 

Courses 11, 12, 21, 22, and any two from 31-32, 33, 34, 35-36, 
43-44, are required for a major. Courses 11, 12, 21, 22, and elec- 
tives in advance of 21, 22 to make a total of 18 hours are required 
for a minor. 

11-12 Elementary Greek 

Emphasis will be laid on the acquisition of a knowledge of the 
fundamental principles of Greek grammar and syntax. Easy selec- 
tions from Greek literature, illustrating the grammar and syntax 
studied, will be read. 
Four hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

21 Epic Poetry 

Selections from Homer's Iliad with special attention to develop- 
ing facility in reading and in the mastery of syntax. The Greek epos 
is considered as an expression of the thought and general conditions 
of early Greek life. 
Three hours. Three credits. 

22 Prose Literature 

A study of Plato's Apology and Criio or similar writings. Special 
consideration is given to the study of the character of Greek thought 
and the men who taught Greek youth the meaning of "reasoned 
truth." 
Three hours. Three credits. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 88 

31-32 Greek Deama 

Aristophanes, the Clouds: Sophocles, Oedipus Tyrannus and An- 
tigone; Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound; Euripides, Alcestis. As many 
as possible of these selections will be studied with special attention to 
metre and scenic antiquities. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

33 Greek Literature in English 

A survey of Greek literature with an intensive study in English 
translation of literary masterpieces. Text book, recitations, lectures, 
assigned library work, selected from the ancient writers and other 
relevant books. Of interest especially to students of English, the 
classics and history. 
Two hours. Two credits. 

34 Greek Life and Thought 

A survey of the religious and social life of the ancient Greeks. 
Mythology, its influence on English literature, and on art in general, 
the social life as expressed in the national games, customs, education, 
public life of the citizen, including law and government will be 
studied. Special emphasis will be placed on Greek contributions to 
modern civilization. No knowledge of the Greek language is required 
for this course. 
Two hours. Two credits. 

35-36 New Testament Greek 

A rapid reading course, designated primarily for candidates for 
the ministry and religious workers; a linguistic and historical inter- 
pretation of the New Testament. Selections from the historical and 
didactic literature. Prerequisite, Greek 21, 22, or equivalent. Alter- 
nates with 31 and 32. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

43-44 New Testament Greek 

A continuation of courses 35-36 with different selections. Alter- 
nates with 35-36. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 



HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

The courses which may be taken for a major (24 hrs.) are 11-12, 
21-22, 31-32, and 41-42. The required supplementary courses to 
the major are principles of Economics (6 hrs.), Principles of So- 
ciology (6 hrs.) The required courses for a minor (18 hrs.) are 



84 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

21-22, 31-32 and 41-42, taken in that order if possible. The required 
supplementary course to the minor is Principles of Economics (6 
hrs.). Majors who feel they may go on to graduate school are urged 
to take Course 44. 

11-12 History of Western Europe 

A survey of the history of Western Europe and the expansion of 
European civilization around the globe. The period covered is from 
the fall of the West Roman Empire to the present. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. MR. Russ 

21-22 History of the United States and of Pennsylvania 

A narrative history which begins with the discovery of America 
and carries the story to the present. This course fulfills the require- 
ment as laid down by the Pennsylvania State Council of Education. 
It must be taken by all prospective teachers. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. Mr. Stevens 

23 History of Civilization 

A brief basic survey of the whole field of history. Special 
emphasis is placed on man's cultural achievements in the political, 
social, religious, intellectual, artistic and economic fields. Human 
ideals and institutions are studied in their general outline, and an 
attempt is made to trace the continuity of culture through the cen- 
turies. Required of Public School Music students. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Meader 

31-32 American Government 

A study of Federal government during the first semester; state 
and local during the second. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. Mr. Russ 

33-34 Ancient History 

A brief survey of the ancient world, covering the history of the 
monarchies of the Near East, the rise of democracy in Greece, and 
the story of Rome down to the Barbarian invasions. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. Mr. Ahl 

41 Economic History of the United States 

A study of the history of manufacturing, agriculture, transporta- 
tion, communication, banking, internal and foreign commerce and 
related topics, within the United States. (Same as Economics 32.) 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Russ 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 85 

42 World Problems 

An analysis of the problems facing the nations in the search for 
international peace. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Russ 

43 Pennsylvania History 

A survey of Pennsylvania as colony and state. Alternates with 
No. 44. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Russ 

44 Seminar 

A course in historiography and the methods of research. The 
purpose is to teach the student, who intends to go to graduate school, 
the mechanics of historical writing. Alternates with No. 43. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Russ 

45 Methods in Teaching the Social Studies 

This course is offered when needed by those out-of-state majors 
who intend to teach the social studies. Given 1948-49. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Russ 



LATIN 

Mr. Meader 

Courses 13-14, 21-22, 31-32, 36 and two courses selected from 
33, 34, 35 are required for a major. Supporting course : 3 hours 
of Ancient History or History of Civilization. Courses 13, 14, 21, 
22, 31, 32 are required for a minor. Students majoring or minoring 
in Latin are urged to elect at least one year's work in Greek, and 
those planning to do graduate work should also have a reading 
knowledge of German. 

The composition course is required for those who plan to do grad- 
uate work or teach. 

11-12 Beginning Latin 

A study of pronunciation, essential forms, and the principles of 
syntax. The aim of this course is to develop as quickly as possible 
an ability to read Latin in simple texts. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

13-14 Intermediate Latin 

Selected orations of Cicero with supplementary reading in Eng- 
lish, Vergil's Aeneid, including a study of the poem as a whole, its 



86 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

sources, poetical diction and its mythological background. Prereq- 
uisite, two years of high school Latin. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

21-22 Ovid and Catullus 

Selections from Ovid's Metamorphoses. Shorter poems of Catul- 
lus. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

31-32 Horace 

Selections from Horace's Odes, Epodes, Satires, and Epistles. A 
study of Horace as a satirist, philosopher, lyric poet, and literary 
critic by a representative study of his words. Prerequisite, Latin 13 
and 14, or four years of high school Latin. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

33 Roman Drama 

Selected plays of Plautus and Terence. Collateral reading on the 
origin, development and technique of Roman comedy. Alternates 
with 35. 
Three hours. Three credits. 

34 Roman Historic Writers 

Passages from Livy's Ab Urbe Condita dealing with the mythical 
age of Roman kings. Selections from Suetonius and Tacitus will be 
studied in the light of their contribution to Roman imperial history. 
Alternates with 36. 
Three hours. Three credits. 

35 Martial 

Martial's Epigrams ; a study of the epigram as a literary form ; 
its source and influence. Alternates with 33. 
Three hours. Three credits. 

36 Latin Language and Prose Composition 

A review of forms and of principles of syntax, drill in reading 
and writing Latin, and a study of Latin style and idiom. Alternates 
with 34. 
Three hours. Three credits. 

38 Latin Literature in English 

This is a survey of Latin literature with an intensive study of 
illustrative authors in English translation. The course is designed 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 87 

to give the student an opportunity of becoming acquainted with the 

treasures of literature. No knowledge of the Latin language is 

required. 

Two hours. Tup credits. 



MATHEMATICS 

Courses 13, 14, 21, 22, 23 and six additional hours are required 
for a major. Courses 13, 14, 21, 22, 23 are required for a minor. 
Students majoring in mathematics should carry a minor in physics. 

11-12 Introduction to College Mathematics 

An introduction to the study of the elementary mathematical 
functions. This course is designed for those whose high school 
mathematics have not been sufficient. 
Two hours throughout the year. No college credit. 

13 College Algebra 

An introduction to the study of elementary algebraic functions 
and the solution of equations. Also progressions, permutation com- 
binations, probabilities and determinants. 
Five hours. Three credits. Mr. Robison 

14 Trigonometry 

The study of the trigonometric functions and logarithms with 
application to triangles. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Robison 

21 Analytic Geometry 

A study is made of systems of coordinates and the relation between 
equations and loci. Prerequisite, Courses 13 and 14. 
Four hours. Four credits. Mr. Robison 

22-23 Calculus 

The concepts and fundamental formulae of differentiation and 
integration are studied and applied to problems involving maxima 
and minima, lengths, areas and volumes. Prerequisite, Course 21. 
Four hours throughout the year. Eight credits. Mr. Robison 

25 Mathematics of Finance 

The mathematical theory underlying interest, annuities, depre- 
ciation, mortality, insurance, and investments. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Robison 



88 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

31 The Foundation of Algebra and Geometry 

A critical analysis of the fundamental concepts and methods of 
reasoning in mathematics. 

Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Robison 



32 The Teaching of Mathematics 

A course in the methods of teaching mathematics in the secondary 
schools. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Robison 

33 Advanced Calculus 

A study of the theoretical aspects of calculus, with particular 
emphasis on infinite processes and the concepts of limit and continu- 
ity. Prerequisite, Courses 21, 23, and 24. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Robison 

34 Advanced Calculus 

A continuation of Course 33. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Robison 

35 Differential Equations 

The formation and geometrical meaning of differential equations 
and the standard methods of solution. Prerequisite, Courses 21, 23, 
and 24. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Robison 



37 Navigation 

A descriptive study of the problems of air navigation as outlined 
by the Civil Aeronautics Administration. The course includes a 
detailed study of meteorology insofar as it affects the handling of 
aircraft. Prerequisite, Mathematics 13-14. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Houtz 



38 Surveying 

Classroom work and field practice in the care and use of surveying 
instruments, running lines and levels, establishing grades, plotting 
and computing areas, running profiles and cross sections. Stress is 
put on the use of the plane table and stadia. Prerequisite, Mathe- 
matics 13-14. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Houtz 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 89 

40 Statistical Methods 

Methods of analyzing and presenting numerical data, with refer- 
ence to probability, averages, and measures of correlation. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Robison 



MUSIC 

21-22 History of Music 

A survey of the development of music from its beginning to the 
present. Current events related to the subject matter of the course 
are brought to the attention of the class. 

Course same as Music 17-18. 
Three hours throughout the yecur. Six credits. Mrs. Sheldon 

30 Music Appreciation 

A course to develop an intelligent appreciation of music. For 
description, see Music 42. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mrs. Giauque 

The above courses are for Liberal Arts students. For complete 
description of courses offered in the Conservatory of Music, see p. 101. 



PHILOSOPHY 

31 Logic 

The guiding principles and conditions of correct thinking, the 
nature of the deductive and the inductive processes, and the basis of 
the scientific method. 
Three hours. Three credits. 

32 Introduction to Philosophy 

An attempt to get a clear understanding of metaphysical reality 
and to present the fundamental facts and principles in relation to 
the categories of thought. 
Three hours. Three credits. 

33 Ancient and Mediaeval Philosophy 

The history of the progress of philosophical thinking from the 
early Greek philosophers to the Kenaissance. 
Three hours. Three credits. 

34 Modern Philosophy 

The history of the progress of philosophical thinking from the 
Renaissance to the present time. 
Three hours. Three credits. 



90 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

42 Modern Philosophers 

The philosophies of .Tames, Royce, Bergson, Dewey, and San- 
tayana. 
Three hours. Three credits. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Courses for Men Mr. Stago 

The war has caused a marked change in the program of required 
classes in Physical Education. The purpose to develop the physical 
well being of the student remains the same, but greater emphasis is 
placed on rugged health, endurance, strength and agility, as goals to 
attain. In addition, qualities of character such as courage, daring, 
poise under emotional strain, confidence in one's self and fair play 
are. fostered. 

11-12M Physical Education 

Required in all college curricula. Covering the period from the 
opening of college to the Thanksgiving recess, the activities include 
calisthenics, football, soccer, touch football, combative games, track, 
golf and tennis. From the Thanksgiving recess to the spring recess, 
the classes meet in the gymnasium and the work consists of calis- 
thenics, informal gymnastics, basketball, volley ball, indoor baseball, 
handball and boxing. From the spring recess to commencement, the 
activities include calisthenics, soft ball, track, baseball, combative 
games, tennis, hiking and golf. Classroom instruction is assigned. 
Three hours throughout the year. Two credits. 

21-22M Physical Education 

Required in all college curricula. The plan and nature of the 
work is similar to Course 11-12. Classroom instruction as assigned. 
Three hours throughout the year. Two credits. 

31-32M Physical Education 

Required in all college curricula. A continuation of course 21-22 
with the privilege of a wider range of sports, and recreational activi- 
ties upon an elective basis. Classroom instruction as assigned. 
Three hours throughout the year. Two credits. 

15-1 6M Physical Education — Restricted Activities 

These courses are planned in consultation with the student's physi- 
cian to meet the needs of individual students who are unable to pur- 
sue the regular courses. Classroom instruction as assigned. 
Two hours throughout the year. Two credits. 

13-14M Personal Hygiene 

This course presents a wide range of materials concerning health- 
ful living. 
One hour throughout the year. Two credits. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 91 

Courses foe Women 

Miss Sparhawk 
11-12W Physical Education 

A foundation course which aims to build a vital interest in team 
games. Hockey, soccer, volley ball, and basketball are played. 
Round Robin Tournament in each activity. Badminton and tennis 
in the second semester. Classroom instruction as assigned. 
Two hours throughout the year. Two credits. 

13-14W Personal Hygiene 

This course presents a wide range of scientific and educational 
materials. Information is presented through lectures, guided dis- 
cussions, surveys, group health projects, and term papers. 
One hour throughout the year. Two credits. 

15-16W Physical Education 

These courses are planned in consultation with the student's phy- 
sician to meet the needs of individual students who are unable to 
pursue the regular courses. Classroom instruction as assigned. 
Two hours throughout the year. Two credits. 

19-20W EURYTHMICS AND FOLK DANCING 

Designed especially to meet the needs of students in the Public 
School Music Course. Course same as Music 19, 20. 
Two hours throughout the year. Two credits in Music Curricula. 

21-22W Physical Education 

A course designed to improve fundamental skills and technique 
throughout the team games. A wide range of folk dance material is 
presented in the second semester. Instruction in tennis. 
Two hours throughout the year. Two credits. 

31-32W Physical Education 

A course similar in nature to 21-22W. Classroom instruction as 
assigned. Badminton and Archery in the second semester. Tourna- 
ments and meets will be planned by students. 
Two hours throughout the year. Two credits. 

41-42 Physical Education 

A course which emphasizes leadership in team games. The 
students plan and manage the intramural program. Instruction in 
coaching and officiating. Tap dancing and golf instruction will be 
given in the second semester. 
Two hours throughout the year. Two credits. 



92 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

PHYSICS 



* 






Mr. Hoover 



Courses 11-12 and 16 semester hours of advanced physics are 
required for a major. Students planning to major in physics should 
plan their schedules to include at least a minor in mathematics. 
Courses 11-12 and 10 semester hours of advanced physics are re- 
quired for a minor. 

11 Introductory Physics 

A course in mechanics, heat and sound. Prerequisites: High 
School credits in algebra and trigonometry. 
Three lectures, one double laboratory period per week. Four credits. 

12 Introductory Physics 

A continuation of Physics 11, studying electricity, magnetism 
and light. 
Three lectures, one double laboratory period per week. Four credits. 

21 Sound 

Production, propagation, and detection of sound waves ; vibrations 
of sounding bodies; Theory of acoustical measurements and instru- 
mentation. Prerequisite : Physics 11-12. 
Three lectures. Three credits. 

22 Electronics 

The phenomena of electron emission from solids; the physical 
properties of electron tubes, and the principles underlying their basic 
applications. Prerequisite : Physics 11-12. 
Two lectures, one double laboratory period per week. Three credits. 

31 Light 

Geometrical optics; elementary theory of wave motion; interfer- 
ence, diffraction, polarization, and dispersion of light; introduction 
to spectroscopy. Prerequisite : Physics 11-12. 
Two lectures, one double laboratory period per week. Three credits. 

32 Atomic Physics 

Constituent particles of matter and kinetic theory; spectra and 
the structure of atoms and molecules; nuclear energy. Prerequisites: 
Physics 11, 12, 31; Mathematics 21, 22, 23. 
Three lectures. Three credits. 

41 Mechanics 

Statics, elasticity, dynamics of solids and gravitation. Prerequi- 
sites: Physics 11-12; Mathematics 21, 22, 23. 
Three lectures. Three credits. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 93 

42 Heat * 

Thermometry, calorimetry, heat conduction, the laws of thermo- 
dynamics with their application to physical systems. Prerequisites: 
Physics 11-12; Mathematics: 21, 22, 23. 
Three lectures. Three credits. 



43-44 Electricity & Magnetism 

Fundamental phenomena of electricity and magnetism; circuit 
theory, including alternating-current circuits; electromagnetic radia- 
tion theory; theory of electrical measurements and introduction to 
practice of electrical measurements. Prerequisites: Physics 11, 12, 
22 ; Mathematics 21, 22, 23. 

Two lectures throughout the year. One double laboratory per week. 
Three credits. 



PSYCHOLOGY 

21 General Psychology 

An introductory course covering the entire field, designed to 
develop a scientific attitude toward psychological problems. A 
description of the receiving, connecting, and re-acting mechanisms. 
A survey of the emotions, sense-perception, imagery, attention, rea- 
soning, learning. Behavior is considered as environmental adjust- 
ment. This course is prerequisite for other courses in psychology. 
Three hours, one hour laboratory per week. Three credits. 

Mr. Waterbury 



22 Educational Psychology 

A study of the laws, characteristics, and the economy of the 
learning process with application to school subjects. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Waterbury 



24 Applied Psychology 

The principles of psychology applied to the vocations, business 
and industry. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Waterbury 



33 Mental Hygiene 

A study of the relationship of personal and environmental factors 
in the production of wholesome and unwholesome life adjustments. 
The sources of emotional conflict are considered, together with the 
formation of attitudes and reaction systems affecting personality 
coordination. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Waterbury 



94 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

34 Abnormal Psychology 

A survey <>f the principal forms of mental derangement and 
diseases, with emphasis upon their causes, symptoms, course of treat- 
ment. Trips to mental institutions are made whenever possible. 
College students may elect the course if they desire. Choruses and 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Waterbury 

41 Social Psychology 

A study of the interaction of individuals in their several group 
relations, the contacts of harmony, and conflict within groups as well 
as between groups, group controls, and the phenomena of imitation 
and suggestion. Course same as Sociology 41. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. WATERBURY 

43 Educational Tests and Measurements in the Secondary 
School 

Historical background of testing; construction and use of tests; 
interpretation of results with emphasis on diagnosis of difficulties 
and remedial measures. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Waterbury 

44 Psychology of Adolescence 

A study of the growth and development of the physical, mental, 
emotional, moral, and religious life of adolescence with the necessary 
educational implications. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mrs. Wells 



SOCIOLOGY 

Mr. Stevens 
21-22 Principles of Sociology 

A systematic study of the fundamentals of human society such as 
the social processes, factors, functions, products, and underlying 
principles. Prerequisite : Sophomore standing. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

23 Anthropology 

As a background for the studies of sociology and philosophy, a 
course of three hours is offered in anthropology with special emphasis 
on its cultural aspect. 
Three hours. Three credits. 

31-32 Modern Social Problems 

The aim of the course will be to locate the significant problems of 
present-day society and to evaluate the current approaches to them. 
Among these problems are those of population, race, labor, delin- 
quency, poverty and dependence, and problems peculiar to rural and 
urban life. Prerequisite: Sociology 21-22. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 95 

44 Social Psychology 

A study of the interaction of individuals in their several group 
relations, the contacts of harmony, and conflict within groups as well 
as between groups, group leadership and group controls, the phenom- 
ena of imitation and suggestion. Course same as Psychology 41. 
Prerequisites: Sociology 21-22; Psychology 21. 
Three hours. Three credits. 

45 Introduction to Social Work 

An introductory course covering the scope and function of the 
different fields of social work. The work of the classroom is supple- 
mented by special lectures and seminars by officials of the various 
social agencies. 
Three hours. Three credits. 

46 The Family as a Social Institution 

The origin and development of the family, function, and rela- 
tion to other primary and secondary groups ; the problems of family 
life and how to meet them. Prerequisite: Sociology 21. 
Three hours. Three credits. 



SPANISH 

Miss Kline 

Courses 45 and 46 and electives in advance of 11-12 to make a 
total of 24 hours are required for a major. 

Courses totaling 18 hours in advance of 11-12 are required for a 
minor. Students planning to teach should include courses 45-46 in 
the 18 hours. 

Students choosing a Spanish major are urged to elect a minor in 
another foreign language. It is also recommended that they elect 
related courses in history, art, philosophy, and other languages and 
literature. 

11-12 Elementary Spanish 

A course in pronunciation, elements of grammar and in reading, 
writing and speaking simple Spanish. Some time is devoted to the 
introduction to Spanish civilization and culture. May not be count- 
ed toward a major or minor. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

21-22 Intermediate Spanish 

A course in grammar, conversation and reading of Spanish and 
Spanish-American prose. Prerequisite: Spanish 11-12 or two years 
of high school Spanish. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 



96 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

31-32 Survey of Spanish Literature 

Lecture and reading course. Study of representative authors 
with special emphasis on the Golden Age and its achievement. Col- 
lateral reading, reports and discussion. Prerequisite: Spanish 21-22. 
Alternates with Spanish 43-44. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

33-34 Modern Drama 

A study of the drama from the romanticists to the present. Read- 
ings with reports and discussion of representative works of Hartzen- 
busch, Echegaray, Galdos, Benavente, los Quinteros and other authors. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

41-42 Modern Novel 

A critical study of literary movements since 1850, as exemplified 
in the works of such novelists as Pardo Bazan, Galdos, Valdes, Pio 
Baroja and Valle Inclan. Collateral reading, reports and discussion. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

43-44 Spanish American Literature 

A study of the development of Spanish American literature from 
its beginnings. Collateral reading, reports and discussion. Alter- 
nates with Spanish 31-32. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

45-46 Advanced Composition and Conversation 

Intensive study of grammar. Oral and written themes, letters, 
etc. ; class conversation and ear-training. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 



SPEECH 

25-26 Debating Mr. Gilbert 

The principles of discussion and debate. The activities of this 
course include organized intercollegiate debates. Open to freshmen, 
but credit given only in the three upper classes. 
One recitation hour throughout the year. Two credits. 

28 Public Speaking 

Emphasis on the practice of speaking in public, together with the 
content and composition of a speech. This course, offered each 
semester, will be required of all pre-ministerial students and prospec- 
tive teachers. 
Three hours. Three credits. 



THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



The Conservatory of Music of Susquehanna University offers 
complete courses of instruction in Pianoforte, Singing, Violin, Organ, 
and Public School Music. The courses are planned with a view to 
developing a high degree of musicianship in students, giving them, 
besides the technique of their special study, that comprehensive insight 
into the nature and structure of music which can be obtained only 
from a practical study of Harmony, Form, and other theoretical 
subjects. 

ENTRANCE CREDITS 

Candidates for the degrees in Music must present entrance credits 
equivalent to a four-year high school course and show evidence of 
aptitude in music. 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

Susquehanna University Conservatory of Music is approved by 
the State Department of Public Instruction for the education of 
supervisors and teachers in Public School Music. 



ORGANIZATIONS 

CONSERVATORY STUDENT ORGANIZATION 

All students taking work in the Conservatory of Music are mem- 
bers of the organization. Officers are elected from among the stu- 
dents, and preside at the meetings of the Recital Class as well as 
other student sessions. All matters pertaining to the welfare of the 
Conservatory of Music are considered through this organization. 

UNIVERSITY BANDS 

The marching band offers opportunity for the schooling of the 
individual marching bandsman in the routine of intricate maneuver 
and drill formation. 

In the concert band standard overtures, suites, and symphonic 
movements of the great masters are studied. Adequate technical 
facility, ability to read music readily, and a feeling for genuine in- 
terpretive skill are emphasized. College credit. 

97 



98 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY ORCHESTRA 

Symphonic orchestral experience is gained in the study of stan- 
dard literature. Instruction is given in orchestral technique and 
methods of rehearsing. Adequate technical facility, ability to read 
music readily, and musicianship are necessary for entrance to this 
orchestra. College credit. 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY CHORUS 

This choral group of mixed voices meets two periods per week, 
being a required course for all sophomores and juniors in music. 
College students may elect the course if they desire. Choruses and 
cantatas are studied, and appearances are made in various recitals 
during the year. College credit. 



RULES AND REGULATIONS 

No reduction is made for absence during the first two weeks of 
the semester, nor for subsequent individual absences. 

All sheet music must be paid for when given out. 

Special holidays declared by the faculty will be observed. Les- 
sons missed because of such action will not be made up by any teacher 
without the consent of the director. 

Students must consult the director before arranging to take part 
in any public musical exercise outside of the regular work. Too 
often students bring unjust criticism on the teacher by appearing 
before an audience without having had sufficient preparation. 

Absence from class or private lessons requires that satisfactory 
excuses shall be offered. Failure in the matter lowers class standing. 

Reports showing attendance, scholarship, deportment, etc., are 
issued at the close of each semester. 

For further information concerning courses, tuition, etc., address 
— Director of the Conservatory of Music, Susquehanna University. 
Selinsgrove, Pa. 

RECITALS 

Students' Evening Recitals — Each semester, recitals are given 
in which students who have been prepared under the supervision of 
the instructors take part. These recitals furnish incentives to study 
and experience in public performance. 

Students' Recital Class — Students who are not sufficiently 
advanced to participate in the Evening Recitals are given experience 
in public performance in the Recital Classes which meet once each 



THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 99 

month. Rules governing stage deportment are brought to the atten- 
tion of the pupils, and topics of general interest to music students 
are discussed. These classes are not open to the public but an excep- 
tion is made in the case of near relatives. 

Artist Recitals — Important to the student of music is the hear- 
ing of compositions of the great masters as interpreted by artists of 
recognized ability. It is the purpose of the management to provide 
such recitals at the University at a nominal cost to the students, as 
well as to assist in making it possible to hear similar recitals in 
nearby cities. All students registered in the Conservatory of Music 
will be charged for this course, unless excused by the Director for 
good reasons. 

PRACTICE TEACHING 

The Senior Class in Music Education teaches and observes in the 
Public Schools of Sunbury, Selinsgrove, and Middleburg. This work 
is done under the direction of Mrs. Alice H Giauque, B.S., A.M., 
Instructor in Methods, Susquehanna University; E. Edwin Sheldon, 
Mus.D., Director of the Conservatory of Music, Susquehanna Univer- 
sity; Eatherine Reed, Mus.B., Supervisor of Music, Sunbury Public 
Schools; Mrs. June Hendricks Hoke, Supervisor of Music, Selins- 
grove Public Schools. 

COLLEGE CREDIT 

College students may elect any of the theoretical subjects and 
have them count as "college electives." 



100 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

EXPENSES 

For the best results in piano, singing, organ, violin, etc., in which 
individual instruction is given, students should take two periods of 
instruction each week. This is in accordance with the general practice 
of conservatories of music. The university year is divided into two 
semesters of equal length. 

The total charge to boarding students for the year, including tuition, 
board, room rent, and all other fees ranges from $810.00 to $830.00 for 
men, and $810.00 to $850.00 for women. 

The total annual charge to day students, registered for the degree 
ranges from $450.00 up depending on the schedule taken. 

Two hours of daily practice on a piano are included in the above rates. 
Organ practice is an additional expense. Its cost is listed under mis- 
cellaneous expenses. 

The following tuition rates per semester are quoted for students not 
registered for a degree course: 

PIANO, SINGING, PIPE ORGAN, VIOLIN, etc. 

Freshman and Sophomore Years 

One semester — 2 one-half hour lessons per week $60.00 

One semester — 1 one-half hour lesson per week 30.00 

Junior and Senior Years 

One semester — 2 one-half hour lessons per week $80.00 

One semester — 1 one-half hour lesson per week 40.00 

Sub-Freshman Year 
PIANO, VIOLIN, CLARINET, TRUMPET, TROMBONE, etc. 

One semester — 2 one-half hour lessons per week $32.00 

One semester — 1 one-half hour lesson per week 16.00 

MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES 

Rent of three-manual organ — one semester, 5 hours per week $25.00 

Rent of three-manual organ — one semester, 2 hours per week 10.00 

Rent of two-manual organ — one semester, 3 hours per week 12.00 

Rent of piano — one semester, 1 hour each day 5.00 

Rent of piano — each additional hour, one semester 2.00 

Private lessons in all theoretical subjects, each 1.00 

Sight Playing library fee — one semester 1.00 

Rent of any orchestral instrument, one semester 5.00 

Music theory subjects not taken for credit toward a degree shall be 
charged at the rate of $12.00 per semester hour. 



THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



101 



COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

Soloist Course 



Freshman Year 



First Semester 

Hrs. Cr. 
Piano, Singing, Organ or 
Orchestral Instruments _ 1 

Second Solo Subject % 

Harmony I 3 

History of Music I 3 

Sight Reading I 3 

Music Dictation I 3 

English 11 & Library Sci. _ 4 

Physical Education 2 

Personal Hygiene 1 



Second Semester 

Hrs. 
Piano, Singing, Organ or 
Orchestral Instruments _ 1 

Second Solo Subject V2 

Harmony II 3 

History of Music II 3 

Sight Reading II 3 

Music Dictation II 3 

English 12 3 

Physical Education 2 

Personal Hygiene 1 



Cr. 

2 
1 
3 
3 
2 
2 
3 
1 
1 



20% 18 



19% 18 



Piano, Singing, Organ or 
Orchestral Instruments _ 

Second Solo Subject 

Harmony III 

Sight Reading III 

Music Dictation III 

Eurythmics I 

English 21 (Survey) 

General Psychology 

Chorus 



Sophomore Year 

Piano, Singing, Organ or 

1 2 Orchestral Instruments _ 1 2 
% 1 Second Solo Subject % 1 

2 2 Harmony IV (Keyboard) _ 2 2 

3 2 Elements of Conducting __ 2 2 
3 2 Educational Measurements 2 2 

2 1 Eurythmics II 2 1 

3 3 English 22 (Survey) 3 3 

3 3 Public Speaking 3 3 

2 1 Chorus 2 1 



19 y 2 17 



17% 17 



Junior 

Piano, Singing, Organ or 

Orchestral Instruments _ 1 2 

Second Solo Subject % 1 

Harmony V (Form &Anal.) 2 2 

Adv. Instrum. Conducting _ 3 3 

An Elective 3 3 

French or German 3 3 

Sight Playing (Piano) 2 1 

Chorus 2 1 

Junior Recital Preparation _ 2 

16% 18 



Year 

Piano, Singing, Organ or 

Orchestral Instruments _ 1 

Second Solo Subject % 

Harmony VI (Composition) 2 

Adv. Choral Conducting 3 

Art Appreciation, 22 3 

French or German 3 

Sight Playing (Piano) ___ 2 

Chorus 2 

Junior Recital - 



16% 19 



102 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 



Senior 

Hrs. Cr. 
Piano, Singing, Organ or 

Orchestral Instruments _ 1 2 

Simple Counterpoint 2 2 

Sight Playing (Piano) 2 1 

French or German 3 3 

Bible I 2 2 

Music Appreciation (PSM) 2 1 

An Elective 3 3 

Senior Recital Preparation _ 3 

15 17 



Year 

Hrs. Cr. 
Piano, Singing, Organ or 

Orchestral Instruments _ 1 2 

Dbl. Counterpoint — Canon _ 3 3 

Sight Playing (Piano) ___ 2 1 

American History 3 3 

Bible II 2 2 

Music Appreciation (Gen.) 2 1 

Senior Recital _ 5 



13 17 



BACHELOE OF SCIENCE IN MUSIC EDUCATION 

This course has been approved by the State Council of Education 
for the preparation of Supervisors and Teachers of Public School 
Music. 



Freshman Year 



First Semester 



Hrs. Cr. 

Harmony I 3 3 

History of Music I 3 3 

Sight Reading I 3 2 

Music Dictation I 3 2 

English 11 & Library Sc. __ 4 3 

Physical Education I 2 1 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, 
Chorus, Band, and Or- 
chestral Instruments 9 3 



Second Semester 



Hrs. Cr. 



Harmony II 3 

History of Music II 3 

Sight Reading II 3 

Music Dictation II 3 

English 12 3 

Physical Education II 2 

Personal Hygiene 1 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, 
Chorus, Band, and Or- 
chestral Instruments 9 



28 18 



27 18 



Sophomore Year 



Harmony III 2 2 

Sight Reading III 3 2 

Music Dictation III 3 2 

Eurythmics I 2 1 

General Psychology 3 3 

History of Civilization 3 3 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, 
Chorus, Band, and Or- 
chestral Instruments 9 3 



Harmony IV (Keyboard) _ 2 

Methods and Materials I __ 4 

Elements of Conducting __ 2 

Eurythmics II 2 

Public Speaking 3 

Survey of English Litera- 
ture (English 22) 3 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, 
Chorus, Band, and Or- 
chestral Instruments 9 



25 16 



25 17 



THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



103 



Junior Year 
Hrs. Cr. 



Harmony V (Form) 2 

Methods and Materials II 4 
Instrumental Conducting _ 3 

Principles of Sociology 3 

Introduction to Education 3 
Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, 
Chorus, Band, and Or- 
chestral Instruments 9 



Hrs. Cr. 

2 Harmony VI (Composition) 2 2 

3 Methods and Materials III _ 4 3 
3 Adv. Choral Conducting __ 3 3 

3 Appreciation of Art 22 3 3 

3 Educational Psychology __ 3 3 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, 
Chorus, Band, and Or- 

3 chestral Instruments 6 2 



24 17 21 16 



Music Appreciation (PSM) 
Bible I 

Science Survey 

Student Teaching and Con- 
ference 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, 
Chorus, Band, and Or- 
chestral Instruments 

Orchestration 



Senior Year 

2 1 Music Appreciation (Gen.) 2 1 

2 2 Bible II 2 2 

3 3 Educational Measurements 2 2 
Student Teaching and Con- 

8 6 ference 7 6 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, 
Chorus, Band, and Or- 

6 2 chestral Instruments 6 2 

2 2 American History 3 3 

23 16 22 16 



INSTRUMENTAL COURSES 

Elementary Class Instruction in Band and Orchestral Instruments 

Students are taught the principles underlying the playing of band 
and orchestral instruments. Problems of class procedure in the pub- 
lic schools are discussed. Ensemble playing is a part of the work 
done. 

String Group — Two hours per week through two semesters. 

Woodwind Group — Two hours per week for two semesters. 

Brass Group — Two hours per week through two semesters. 

Percussion — One hour per week. One semester. 



Advanced Class Instruction in Band and Orchestral Instruments 

Further study may be pursued in Band and Orchestral Instru- 
ments as follows : 

String Choir (Viola, Violoncello, and Bass Viol) 
"Woodwind Choir (Flute, Oboe, and Bassoon) 



104 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Brass Choir (All brass instruments not studied in the elemen- 
tary classes.) 

Junior Band — One hour per week. 

Junior Orchestra — One hour per week. 

Students of the elementary and advanced instrumental classes are 
given an opportunity to play instruments in the Junior Band and 
the Junior Orchestra, an experience of great value. 

Orchestra and Band Technique will be offered as an elective 
when sufficient demand is made for such course. 
Smaller Ensembles 

String Trio 

String Quartet 

String Quintet 

Violin Choir 

Brass Ensemble 

Woodwind Ensemble 



DESCRIPTION OF COUESES 

Professor Sheldon (Director), Professor Linebaugh, Professor 

Hatz, Mrs. Giauque, Mrs. Sheldon, Mrs. Hatz, 

Miss Potteiger, Mr. Haskins 

11 Harmony I 

A study of first essentials in music ; scales, intervals, note and rest 
values, musical terms, etc., thereby laying a foundation for further 
harmonic writing and musical development. 
Three hours. Three credits. MRS. Hatz 

12 Harmony II 

The supertonic, submediant, and mediant harmonies, with their 
sevenths and their inversions as well as simple chromatic alterations 
are studied. Melody writing and melodic invention using these 
simpler harmonies are a part of this semester's work. 

Three hours. Three credits. Mrs. Hatz 

13 Sight Reading I 

Students read at sight music of moderate difficulty, using the 
sol-fa syllables as well as words. Tone and rhythm are stressed. 
Three hours. Two credits. Miss Potteiger 



THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 105 

14 Sight Reading II 

The work of the first semester is continued introducing chromatics 
and more difficult intervals and rhythms. Two and three-part songs 
with words add to the interest of this course. 

Three hours. Two credits. Miss Potteiger 

15 Dictation I 

A study of tone and rhythm enabling the student to sing and write 
melodic phrases which have first been visualized. 

Three hours. Two credits. Mr. Linebaugh 

16 Dictation II 

Melodic dictation is continued throughout this semester, stressing 
the development of memory in writing longer phrases with melodic 
and rhythmic accuracy. 

Three hours. Two credits. Mr. Linebaugh 

17 History of Music I 

The development of music from its beginnings to the period of the 
classical composers is covered in this semester. Current events are 
brought to the attention of the class each week and students are 
encouraged to do such reading in the library. 

Three hours. Three credits. Mrs. Sheldon 

18 History of Music II 

Music and musicians from the classical period to the present, to- 
gether with current events, are given serious consideration. 

Three hours. Three credits. Mrs. Sheldon 

19 EuRYTHMICS I 

This course aims to enrich and develop the individual's musical 
ability by stimulating his bodily responses. The student learns to 
interpret meter, rhythm, and phrasing not as a mathematical prob- 
lem but as movement. 
Two hours. One credit. 

20 EURYTHMICS II 

Built upon the foundation of Eurythmics I, this course demands 
greater skill, concentration, and a vivid imagination in order to 
creatively express and interpret the more complicated rhythms. Em- 
phasis is placed upon the development of balance, relaxation, grace, 
and poise. 
Two hours. One credit. 



106 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

21 Harmony III 

The study of chromatic harmony and chord species is included in 
Harmony III. This material is applied in various types of modu- 
lation. Original melody writing and modulation using the material 
are a part of the course. 

Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Hatz 

22 Harmony IV 

Knowledge of diatonic harmonies, non-chordal tones, easy chro- 
matic chords, and modulation, are applied to the keyboard. Included 
in the course are transposition, sequences, and creative work at the 
keyboard. 

Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Hatz 

23 Sight Reading III 

This course presupposes that the student has satisfactorily com- 
pleted Courses I and II. ]NTew material is constantly used, and speed 
and accuracy in reading from the G and F clefs are required. 

Three hours. Two credits. Miss Potteiger 

24 Methods and Materials I 

The work covered in the course includes music materials suitable 
for the elementary grades, textbooks, songs, and classroom music 
procedure. One hour per week will be devoted to "applied methods," 
including observation and preliminary practice teaching in the 
schools. 

Four hours. Three credits. Mrs. Giauque 

25 Dictation III 

Harmonic dictation is designed to develop ability to recognize and 
write chord progressions, making use of the various harmonies as 
they are required. 
Three hours. Two credits. Mr. Linebaugh 



26 Elements of Conducting 

Principles of conducting; study of methods of conductors; daily 
practice in adapting these methods to school purposes; score reading 
and program making are points receiving attention. Orchestra] and 
choral conducting are a part of the student's experience. 

Two hows. Two credits. Mr. Hatz 



THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 107 

27-28 Chorus Class 

A study of music applicable to high school groups, amateur 
choruses, and choirs. An acquaintance with choral music from Bach 
to the present. Discussion of choral music, voice testing, and ways of 
judging compositions. This course is open to college students. It is 
required of sophomores and juniors in the Music Education Course. 

Mrs. Giauque 

29 Methods and Materials II 

The work covered in the course includes music materials suitable 
for the intermediate grades, textbooks, songs, and classroom music 
procedure. One hour per week will be devoted to "applied methods," 
including observation and preliminary practice teaching in the 
schools. 
Four hours. Three credits. Mrs. Giauque 

30 Methods and Materials III 

A study of music courses for junior and senior high schools. 
Among the problems considered are classification of voices, methods 
of dealing with the adolescent voice, assembly, music clubs, bands 
and orchestras, and routine work pertaining to these departments. 
Four hours. Three credits. Mrs. Giauque 

31 Harmony V 

This course includes a study of the motive, the phrase, period 
forms, two and three-part song forms, rondo forms, sonata form, etc. 
Detailed analysis is presented in connection with each lesson. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Sheldon 

32 Harmony VI 

Included in this course is creative application of materia^ of all 
previous harmony courses. Composition in various vocal and instru- 
mental forms is presented and the best work is given performance 
before the music students. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Sheldon 

33 Advanced Instrumental Conducting 

Consideration of the methods and principles of conducting applied 
to the orchestra and band. Development of baton technique, score 
reading, orchestral playing and the psychology of rehearsing 
ensembles of various sizes and combinations. Orchestral literature 
adaptive to public school work is studied in this course. Opportunity 
is given the student to conduct compositions of different character. 
Three hours. Three credits. MR. Hatz 



108 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

34 Advanced Choral Conducting 

A more detailed study of the principles of conducting applied to 
choral groups. A discussion of points helpful in the organization 
and direction of church choirs, mixed choruses, a cappella choirs, and 
larger groups producing oratorios. The young conductor is given 
opportunity to appear before groups, acquiring power through such 
experience in this particular field, enabling him to be at ease when 
called on to serve in the capacity of a choral conductor. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Haskins 

35-36 Piano Sight Playing 

Students of the Junior Year who elect to major in Piano or 
Organ are given two periods each week in ensemble playing. Music 
of average difficulty is placed before them for sight reading. 
Two hours throughout the year. Two credits. Mr. Linebaugh 

37 Simple Counterpoint 

Melody against melody is written throughout the five species, be- 
ginning with two-part and continuing up to eight voices. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Linebaugh 

38 Double Counterpoint and Canon 

Counterpoint so written that it may be removed an octave, tenth, 
or twelfth above or below the cantus firmus. Canons (direct imita- 
tion) are written in all intervals and prepare the student for the more 
advanced contrapuntal work in instrumental and vocal fugue. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Sheldon 

39 Instrumental and Vocal Fugue 

Contrapuntal writing reaches its culmination in the Fugue. Two, 
three, four and five voiced fugues are written by the student. Analy- 
sis of fugues by Johann Sebastian Bach is included in this course. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Sheldon 

41 Music Appreciation I (P.S.M.) 

Methods — An outline course of study on procedure and appli- 
cable materials for the Elementary, Intermediate, and Junior High 
School. 
Two hours. One credit. Mrs. Giauque 

42 Music Appreciation II (General) 

The development of a critical judgment of music through an 
appreciation of various forms and modes, through recordings and 
renditions by faculty and visiting artists. General appreciation is 
particularly suitable for college students. 
Two hours. One credit. Mrs. Giauque 



THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 109 

43-44 Piano Sight Playing 

Students of the senior class who elect to major in piano or organ 
are given two periods per week in ensemble playing similar to that 
in the Junior year, but with music of greater difficulty. 

Two hours throughout the year. Two credits. Mr. Linebaugh 

45-46 Student Teaching and Conference 

The seniors in Music Education observe and do teaching in the 
public schools of Selinsgrove and Sunbury under the supervision of 
their methods instructor and members of the faculty mentioned under 
Practice Teaching. In addition to the student teaching they have 
critic classes and special conferences. 

Mrs. Giauque 

47 Orchestration 

This course is devoted to arranging music for the orchestra and 
implies an intimate knowledge of the range, qualities, and varied 
capabilites of all orchestral instruments. Attention is given to 
scoring accompaniments for high school choral literature. 

Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Hatz 

48 Orchestra and Band Technique 

Instrumental Teaching Techniques are outlined and these demon- 
strated with groups. Instrumental organization and administration 
including the study of curriculum for instrumental teachers, and 
consideration of the problems of the band and orchestra director are 
herein set forth. 

Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Hatz 

50 Instrumental Technique Class 

A laboratory class designed to give the student opportunity to 
inquire into, discuss, and experiment with the problems and tech- 
niques of teaching and performing which confront the music educa- 
tor on the flute, oboe, bassoon, and percussion. 
One hour. Mrs. Hatz 

52 Educational Measurements 

The measurement of specific capacities or abilities involved in 
the hearing, appreciation and performance^ of music, based on a 
scientific analysis of elements which function in all musk. The 
techniques of administering aptitude tests for the discovering and 
developing of music interest are practised and applied. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Sheldon 



110 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

PIANOFORTE 

Sub-freshmen — First, Second and Third Grades — The New 
England Conservatory Graded Course for Piano, Books I, II, III 
and Pieces of corresponding difficulty. 

Freshman Year — Scales in parallel and contrary motion mem- 
orized and played. Arpeggios built on the three triad positions. 
Technique, touch, and phrasing. Etudes: Duvernoy, Op. 120; 
Czerny, Op. 636; Loeschhorn, Op. 52; Kohler, Op. 242. Sonatina? 
— Clementi, Op. 36; Gurlitt, Op. 54 — The Clavecin Book of Anna M. 
Bach. Pieces of corresponding difficulty. 

Sophomore Year— Scales in Thirds and Sixths memorized and 
played. Arpeggios built on the Diminished Seventh Chord. Technic, 
touch, phrasing, and memorizing. Etudes — Loeschhorn, Op. 66 ; 
Czerny, Op. 299. Schirmer Sonata Album, Vol. 239. (Haydn, 
Mozart, Beethoven.) J. S. Bach-Busoni — Two-part Inventions. 
Pieces of corresponding difficulty. 

Junior Year — Scales in Accents; scales with two and three notes 
against one and two. Arpeggios built on the Dominant Seventh 
Chord. Technique touch, phrasing, memorizing, interpretation, and 
ensemble playing. Etudes — Cramer's Fifty Selected Studies ; Czerny, 
Op. 740 with metronome. Sonatas — Beethoven. J. S. Bach-Faelton 
— Three-part Studies. Pieces of corresponding difficulty. 

Junior Recital 

Senior Year — Technique, touch, phrasing, memorizing, interpre- 
tation, and ensemble playing. Etudes — dementi's Gradus ad Par- 
nassum, Chopin's Studies. Sonatas and Concertos by Beethoven, 
Schumann, Mendelssohn, etc. J. S. Bach — Preludes and Fugues 
Pieces of corresponding difficulty. 

Senior Recital 

SINGING 

Introduction — To major in singing, the applicant must possess 
certain qualities and talents requisite to the accomplishments of a 
singer, including a healthy throat. 

Freshman Year — A study of the vocal instrument. Respiration 
and exercises for developing lung capacity. Correct postnre and 
plastic exercises for developing freedom of bodily motion. Vowel 
sounds and consonants in definite form. Articulating organs. Hum- 



THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC HI 

ming. Vocal Hygiene. Songs in medium compass of voice. Con- 
centration. Memory. Vocal technique based on the major scale. 
Sieber Vocalises. 

^ Sophomore Year — Routine drill on vocal technique. Major and 
minor scales. Italian diction. Vaccai Studies. Concentration. Song 

literature. Songs Schubert, Brahms, Mozart, Wolf, Handel, and 

Gluck. 

Junior Year — Routine drill on vocal technique. Chromatic 
scale. Phrasing. Embellishments. Panofka vocalises. Vocal style. 
Memory. Concentration, Interpretation. Mimicry. Poise. Songs 
in Italian, French, or German. Songs in English and Latin. 

Junior Recital 

Senior Year — Daily Vocal Drill. Advanced technique. A study 
of the Trill and Messa di Voce. Bordogni vocalises. Mimicry. Song 
literature — classic and modern. Oratorio. Opera. 

Senior Recital 



PIPE ORGAN 

The object of this department is to prepare practical organists for 
the church service as well as concert playing. 

To be admitted to this course the student must have attained a 
reasonable piano technique and fluency. 

Two lessons per week are required for the Sophomore, Junior, and 
Senior years. 

Freshman Year — General outline of the construction of the 
organ. "The Organ" by Stainer. Pedal Studies. Easy Trios by 
Schneider, and other organ composers. Playing of hymns. Easy 
organ pieces. 

Sophomore Year — Dudley Buck's 18 Studies in Pedal Phrasing. 
Organ Trios of moderate difficulty. Little Preludes and Fugues by 
J. S. Bach. A study of organ registration, and playing of hymns 
and easier anthems. Organ pieces of moderate difficulty. 

Junior Year — Technique, interpretation, registration. Truette — 
34 Pedal Studies from J. S. Bach's works. The easier movements 
from Sonatas for Organ by Mendelssohn, Guilmant, etc. Preludes 
and Fugues of moderate difficulty by J. S. Bach and Mendelssohn. 
Advanced anthems and service playing. Pieces of corresponding 
difficulty. 

Junior Recital 



112 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Senior Year — Preludes, Toccatas and Fugues by Bach, Guil- 
mant and others. Sonatas and advanced concert pieces by Rhein- 
berger, Widor, Dethier, etc. 

Senior Recital 



VIOLIN 

Sub-freshman Year — S cales and Technics — Blumenstengle 
Scales, Bk. 1. Methods — Bang, Pts. 1, and 2, or Hohmann, Bks. 1, 
and 2. Studies— Wohlfahrt, Op. 45, Bk. 1. Kayser, Op. 20, Bk. 1. 
Pieces — 1st position 

Freshman Year — Scales and Technics — Blumenstengle Scales, 
Bk. 2. Sevcik School of Bowing, Pt. 1 Studies— Wohlfahrt, Op. 
45, Bk. 2. Kayser, Op. 20, Bk. 2. Wohlfahrt, Op. 74, Bk. 2. 
Pieces — 1st and Srd positions. 

Sophomore Year — Scales and Technics — Schradieck Scales. 
Sevcik, Op. 1, Bk. 3. Sevcik School of Bowing, Pts. 1 and 2. Studies 
—Kayser Op. 20, Bk. 3. Mazas, Op. 36, Bk. 1. Sitt, Op. 22, Bk. 3 
or Kayser, Op. 57. 
Solos — 1st and 5th positions. 

Junior Year — Scales and Technics — Schradieck Scales. Schra- 
dieck School of Violin Technics, Pt. 1. Sevcik, Op. 8 and 9. Studies 
—Mazas, Op. 36, Bk. 2. Dont, Op. 37. David, The Advanced Stu- 
dent, Pt. 2. Sonatas and Concertos by Viotti, Mardini, Bach, and 
Mozart. 

Junior Recital 

Senior Year — Scales and Technics — Schradieck Scales. Casorti 
Op. 50. Dancla, Op. 74. School of Velocity. Studies. Florillo, 36 
Caprices. Kreutzer, 42 Studies. Rode, 24 Caprices. Sonatas and 
Concertos by Mendelssohn, Bruch, Wieniawski, and Viotti. 

Senior Recital 

THE SECOND "SOLO SUBJECT" 

Candidates for graduation in piano shall have taken at least three 
years in voice, violin, or organ. For graduation in voice, violin, or 
organ, the student shall have completed the Sophomore requirements 
in piano. 



IUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



The first Alumni Association at Susquehanna University was 
organized June 4, 1884. The Association now embraces 2,700 alumni 
and former students; 35% are teachers, 12% ministers, 8% business 
men, 3% physicians, 3% lawyers; and all of the leading professions 
are represented. Susquehanna alumni are located in thirty-six states 
and many foreign countries. There are eighteen district alumni 
clubs active in Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Dis- 
trict of Columbia, Maryland, and California. 

The Susquehanna University Alumni Association is governed by 
the Association officers and Alumni Council. The Association pub- 
lishes a fine Alumni Quarterly, sponsors an annual Alumni Fund, and 
organizes alumni affairs in the districts and on the campus. 



Alumni Officers 

Honorary President, Dr. George E. Fisher, '88 Selinsgrove 

President,, Ernest F. "Walker, '21 Johnstown 

First Vice-President, Addison E. Pohle, '27 -- — -- Altoona 

Second Vice-President, Harry M. Rice, '26 Bloomfield, 1ST. J. 

Recording Secretary, Ruth Bergstresser, '34 Hazleton 

General Secretary, Ruth E. McCorkill, '43 Northumberland 

Treasurer 

Statistician, Edwin M. Brungart, '00 Selinsgrove 



Executive Committee of Alumni Council 

Ernest F. Walker, '21, Chairman Johnstown 

Addison E. Pohle, '27 — Altoona 

Harry M. Rice, '26 Bloomfield, K J. 

Ruth Bergstresser, '34 Hazleton 

Ruth E. McCorkill, '43 Northumberland 

H. Vernon Blough, '31 Johnstown 

William Brubaker, '27 York 



113 



114 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

LADIES' AUXILIAKY OF SUSQUEHANNA UNIVEKSITY 

On February 4, 1922, a group of ladies directly interested in the 
growth of Susquehanna University met in Seibert Hall and effected 
an organization known as the Ladies Auxiliary of Susquehanna 
University. 

The aim of the Auxiliary is to promote the interests of Susque- 
hanna University both spiritually and financially, and to support 
such undertakings as shall be authorized by the general body. 

Six sub-auxiliaries have been formed. Mount Carmel, April 10, 
1937, Lewistown, April 26, 1937, Johnstown, May 1, 1938, Williams- 
port, October 17, 1940, Hazleton, October 22, 1940, and Harrisburg, 
February 25, 1941. 

It is hoped that through the activities of these auxiliaries, aid may 
be given in more extensive advertising, in the improvement of condi- 
tions in the buildings and on the campus, and in general work for a 
greater Susquehanna. 



DEGREES CONFERRED AND 
LIST OF STUDENTS 

DEGREES CONFERRED IN 1946 



Bachelor of Arts 
Ruth Findlay Cochrane"! Bloomfield, 1ST. J. 

Gloria Elvira Gasparoli ^ Marlboro, N". Y. 

Arthur Junior Gelnett JL Selinsgrove 

Norma Jane Hazen* v^v-I -- Sunbury 

Blair LeRov^ Heaton *_. ~ Pitcairn 

June Louisa Hoffman Hazleton 

Roswell James Johns *«:'_ Honesdale 

Charlotte Smith\/1 . Morrisville 

Bernard Stanley Swiencki*/^, Glen Lyon 

Martha Jayne Troutman *£c Elizabethville 

Lawrence John Weller +/-- Aristes 

Bachelor of Science 

Marjorie Barton c' Williamsport 

James Robert Clark Harrisburg 

Betty Jayne Herr tfi ^ Hazleton 

Selena Helen Lehmanv^ Sunbury 

Jane Rowe Malkames Hazleton 

Charles Glenn Schueler ^ Bloomfield, N. J. 

Jean Nancy Wheat Cedar Grove, N. J. 

Rine Graybill Winey Selinsgrove 

Bachelor of Science in Music Education 

Carmen Marie Beckwith Oakmont 

Emily Lou Botdorf Harrisburg 

Marie A. Klick Wind Gap 

Gloria Gilda Machamer Wiconisco 

Anna Catherine Miller Sunbury 

Janet Louise RohrbaSh Sunbury 

Hope B. Spicer New Providence, N. J. 

Marjorie Joan Stapleton Tamaqua 

Dorothy Louise Sternat Biglerville 

Jean Louise Strausser Mt. Carmel 



•Graduated magna cum lau'de 



116 



U6 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Prize Awards for 1946 

The Charles E. Covert Memorial Prize 
Jean Kelly Goshen, N. Y. 

The Stine Mathematical Prize 
Betty Louise Smith Woodsboro, Md. 

The Sigma Alpha Iota National Fraternity Music Prize 
Marie A. Klick Wind Gap 

Omega Delta Sigma Sorority Scholarship Prize 
Ruth Findlay Cochrane Bloomfield, ~N. J. 

Kappa Delta, Phi Sorority Scholarship Prize 
Norma Jane Hazen Sunbury 



Senior Class 1946-47 

Alessi, Victor Peter Coraopolis 

Bashore, Donald Ray Selinsgrove 

Bongartz, Ferdinand Alphonse Bloomfield, N. J. 

Bowman, Robert Trone Hanover 

Braveman, Jacqueline Lee New York, N. Y. 

Brown, Ralph Condit, Jr. Bloomfield, N. J. 

Camerer, William Robert, Jr. Jersey Shore 

Clark, Gayle Virginia Drexel Hill 

Corcoran, Frank Coraopolis 

Cryder, Leah Marguerite Woolrich 

Day, Naomi Elizabeth Red Lion 

Doss, Helen Eby Newport 

Eastep, Clair Harold Harrisburg 

Fellows, Robert Charles Altoona 

Felton, Helen Grace Elizabeth, N. J. 

Fertig, Franklin Ellsworth Northumberland 

Flock, Allen Williams Sunbury 

Garman, Lenore Kathleen Selinsgrove 

Grandolini, Eugene Paul Scranton 

Gross, William David Selinsgrove 

Gundrum, Sara Jane Rockwood 

Hallock, Eula Virginia Milton, N. Y. 

Hochstuhl, Raymond George Bloomfield, N. J. 

Huver, Jean Louise Allentown 

James, Thomas Edison Selinsgrove 

Johns, Margaret Helen Honesdalc 

Kelly, Ella Jean Goshen, N. Y. 

Kemp, Edith Sunbury 

Leach, John Robert Selinsgrove 

Lepley, Helen Virginia Winfield 

Lizzio, Mary Ann Conemaugh 



LIST OF STUDENTS 117 

Loss, Kenneth Donald Middleburg 

Markey, Hilda Mabel York 

Milford, James Steidle Hazleton 

Miller, Elizabeth Anne Williamsport 

Moglia, Richard Daniel Glen Ridge, N. J. 

Myers, Nancy Elizabeth Elizabethtown 

Nale, Stanley Leo Harrisburg 

Reichard, John Milton Wilkinsburg 

Riegel, George Ellsworth Williamsport 

Rothenberg, William Boone Sunbury 

Schlick, Louise Helen Kingston 

Schnure, Margaret Jane Selinsgrove 

Solomon, Howard H. South Williamsport 

Stonesifer, Oscar Stanley, Jr. Harrisburg 

Talbot, Marie May Reading 

Taylor, Joseph Wildwood, N. J. 

Thompson, Elise Claire Lynbrook, N. Y. 

Wagner, Dorothy Virginia Aldan 

Williams, Ruth Elizabeth Bloomfield, N. J. 

Wolfe, Adah Arlene Mill Hall 



Junior Class 

Ague, Charles William Hughesville 

Apple, Joan Sunbury 

Arseniu, Frosta Mary Lewistown 

Arthur, Cora Mae Hughesville 

Barry, Richard Paul, Jr. Altoona 

Bathgate, Bessie Margaret State College 

Bomboy, David Edward Bloomsburg 

Bomgardner, William Earl Hershey 

Boyer, Jack Wesley Sunbury 

Boyer, Ronald Herbert Pillow 

Clark, William Samuel Bloomsburg 

Conrad, Theron Walter Sunbury 

Cosgrove, Donald Richard Bloomfield, N. J. 

Dankman, Herbert Stephen Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Dauberman, Lois Christine Nemacolin 

Doss, Virginia Audrey Cranford, N. J. 

Ebert, Dawn June Shamokin Dam 

Eilhardt, Edith Dorothy Clarks Summit 

Flickinger, Harry Stuard Sunbury 

Frank, Betty Great Neck, N. Y. 

Gaetz, Roberta Moser Mt. Carmel 

Garard, Martha Evelyn Lewisburg 

Gibson, Ann Elizabeth Lewistown 

Glanzberg, Alvin Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Gould, Harriet Ann Johnstown 

Graybill, Caroline Mae McAlisterville 

Harbeson, Carolyn Hope Milroy 

Hazen, Marianna Sunbury 

Hebel, Harold Lee Liverpool 

Herman, Carl Lindbergh Lewisburg 

Koons, Bernadine Marie Mt. Carmel 

Kramer, Harold Raymond Allentown 

Kramer, Jeanette Elizabeth Sunbury 

Kreps, Julia Arlene Lewistown 



* 118 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

t 

Krouse, Marlin Philip Shamokin Dam 

Laks, Ruth Elaine Kingston 

Leisenring, Frances Marie Bear Gap 

Maddocks, Robert Stanley, Jr. Bloomfield, N. J. 

Malkames, Ann Ross Hazleton 

Maneval, Marvin Wesley Newport 

Mengel, Marjorie Elizabeth ' Freeburg 

Mix, Arnold George Bloomfield, N. J. 

Narayan, Ongkar British Guiana 

Packman, Allan B. Atlantic City, N. J. 

Parcells, Alan Auburn, N. Y. 

Peters, Helen Hope Reedsville 

Peyton, Joseph Paul, Jr. Red Bank, N. J. 

Polanchyck, Nedia Frackville 

Reichley, Gloria Irene Dover 

Reisch, Betty Katz i Ashland 

Richards, Edward E. Mt. Pleasant Mills 

Roberts, Gertrude A. New Monmouth, N. J. 

Schreiner, Carol Kathleen Williamstown 

Sharwarko, Martha Dorothy Hazleton 

Sheetz, Anna Marie Mt. Carmel 

Shook, Velma Grace Allentown 

-, Shroyer, Shirley Irene Sunbury 

Smith, Betty Louise Woodsboro, Md. 

Smith, Sara Lee Scranton 

Snyder, Charles William Lebanon 

Steele, Eleanor Elizabeth Harrisburg 

Stetler, Paul B. Middleburg 

Stout, Marie Eleanor Neptune, N. J. 

Stow, George Clifford, Jr. Merchantville, N. J. 

Strouse, Florence Elizabeth Proctor 

Tietbohl, Augustus Valentine South Williamsport 

Wagoner, Gaynelle Pylesville, Md. 

Walker, Virginia Marie Beavertown 

Walmer, Gloria Jane Harrisburg 

Weikel, Dexter Neil New Berlin 

Welliver, Harry William Beaver Meadows 

Wiley, John Dexter Merchantville, N. J. 

Williard, Joseph Raymond Lewistown 

Wolfe, Franklin Robert Tremont 

Wood, Mary Ellen Farmingdale, N. Y. 

Zeidler, Frank Albert Bloomfield, N. J. 

Sophomore Class 

Adams, Donald Lerve Mifflinburg 

Apriceno, Louis Paul Berwick 

Avery, Miriam Jane Kingston 

Bailey, Rosaline May Selinsgrove 

Bergstresser, John Benjamin Selinsgrove 

. Bergstresser, Rachel Snyder Selinsgrove 

Billow, Grace Ellen McAlistervillc 

Bingaman, Paul Rearick Thompsontown 

Black, Constance Lou Millerstown 

Blecher, Jean Elizabeth Danville 

Bloom, Kay Lee Sunbury 

Bollinger, Marlin Raymond Northumberland 



LIST OF STUDENTS 119 

Bottorff, Joyce Elaine, Lewistown 

Bousum, Dorothy Carolyn ! Glenolden 

Brindel, Anna Margaret Lewistown 

Bringman, Dale S. Hanover 

Brown, Russell Franklin Roaring Spring 

Bubb, Robert Neil Milton 

Buffington, Ruth Mary c Valley View 

Butts, Harry William, Jr. East Orange, N. J. 

Childress, Barbara Ellen : York 

Cochrane, Virginia Wayne Bloomfiefd", N. J. 

Cooper, George Asbury South Williamsport 

Culp, Harry Conrad ___.. Sunbury 

Dale, Mary Louise . Renovo 

Day, Gilbert Oliver, Jr. Selinsgrove 

Decker, Doris Arlene Millheim 

Derr, Aloysius Vincent Ashland 

Derr, Jean Eleanor Selinsgrove 

Dornsife, Robert Lloyd Gordon 

Etzrodt, Edna Mae Scranton 

Everett, Nancy Ann 1 Bayside, L. I., N. Y. 

Fetterolf, Frank Kinzey Johnstown 

Fisher, Millard George Berwick 

Fisher, Robert Alfred Selinsgrove 

Ford, Edward H. Northumberland 

Fosselman, Donald W. Newport 

Gardner, Dorothy Eleanor Allentown 

Getsinger, Mary Ann Wildwood, N. J. 

Gundrum, Eugene Haines Rockwood 

Heim, John William Reading 

Houser, Stanley Paul Lewistown 

Howell, James Franklin Beavertown 

Hugus, Howard Shannon Selinsgrove 

James, Harry Keithan Philadelphia 

Jessen, Mary Jane Camas, Washington 

Johnston, Harry Ryan Greensburg 

Jones, Maude Bessie Shamokin 

Kaley, Alice Marie Williamsport 

Keller, Janet Louise Windber 

Keller, Juanita Belle Jefferson, Md. 

Kepner, Lillian Mae Baltimore, Md. 

Kilhefner, Geraldine Rose Ephrata 

Kimble, James David South Williamsport 

King, Donald Alvin Sunbury 

Kiss, Isabel Marlboro, N. Y. 

Klinger, Ruth Elizabeth Sugarloaf 

Kretsinger, Louise Elizabeth Washington, D. C. 

Lady, Charles Luther Biglerville 

Latta, Margaret Helen Lockport, N. Y. 

Lau, Grace Elizabeth __ Spring Grove 

Leitzel, James Silar, Jr. Richfield 

Lindemann, Richard William Bloomfield, N. J. 

Lundahl, Martha Marie Newville 

Lybarger, Nina Frances , Lampeter 

McAllister, Elwood Marlin Northumberland 

McClure, William Horting Lewistown 

McHenry, Marjorie Ann Stillwater 

Matthews, Jean Elizabeth Middletown, N. Y. 

Mattson, Dolores Mae Coatesville 



120 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Merz, Kenneth Malcolm Philadelphia 

Mummey, Stanley Henry Sunbury 

Myers, Winifred Jane Muncy Valley 

Nitchman, Dorothy Mae York 

Orr, Kenneth DeWitt East Orange, N. J. 

Outerbridge, Warren Somersall Shelly Bay, Bermuda 

Peters, James Burleigh Millersburg 

Pethick, Marjorie Marie Honesdale 

Phillips, Muriel Alice Old Greenwich, Conn. 

Pirie, Warren James Bloomfield, N. J. 

Plock, William Lloyd Sunbury 

Radell, Robert William Williamsport 

Raup, Columbus Hill Sunbury 

Reaver, Mildred Katharine Gettysburg 

Reilly, James Bernard Lawrence, N. Y. 

Reitz, Daniel Irvin, Jr. Selinsgrove 

Rishell, Esther Ann Marietta 

Robson, Marion Cornell Marlboro, N. Y. 

Rohrbach, Donald P. Sunbury 

Ruhl, William R. Mifflinburg 

Rush, Lucretia Elizabeth Cranford, N. J. 

Savidge, Frances Alberta Shamokin 

Schneider, Katherine Anna Sunbury 

Schweighofer, Rita Fay Honesdale 

Secrist, Wayne DeRoy Millerstown 

Shaffer, Dorothy Isabel Sunbury 

Shaffer, Nevin Theodore Sunbury 

Sharrow, Janet Louise Muncy 

Sheetz, Wilfred Jack Selinsgrove 

Slicer, Sally Elizabeth Meyersdale 

Smith, Mary Helen Sunbury 

Southwick, Margaret Jane Millburn, N. J. 

Speyer, Gabrielle Pamela New York, N. Y. 

Steigerwalt, Marian Constance Schuylkill Haven 

Steininger, Eugene Beachel Middleburg 

Strawbridge, Irma Rosanna Lemoyne 

Swartz, Phyllis Irene Lewistown 

Tietbohl, Ralph Harry South Williamsport 

Venner, Charles Aked Bloomfield, N. J. 

Wanbaugh, Doris Elaine York 

Williams, Margaret Harriet Mt. Carmel 

Williams, Russell Henry Sunbury 

Williams, Sarah Elaine Bloomfield, N. J. 

Wilson, Richard L. Sunbury 

Winter, Robert E. Williamsport 

Wohlsen, Robert Fischer Yonkers, N. Y. 

Wolfe, Fancher Elbert Shamokin 

Woodring, Alvin James Bloomsburg 

Wright, Anne Barbara Hazleton 

Yancho, William Philip Morris Plane, N. J. 

Yarnell, Shirley June Lewistown 

Young, Lois Jane Lewistown 

Zerbe, Maynard Nelson Sunbury 

Zlock, Evan Paul Coaldale 



LIST OF STUDENTS 121 

Freshman Class 

Akers r Robert H. Muncy 

Anderson, Barbara Elaine __ 7 Johnstown 

Andrews, Jean Edith ,\ — Li Rockville Centre, N. Y. 

Appleby, Margaret Catherine Mount Union 

Arbogast, Edith Irene ,._'___ Selinsgrove 

Arthur, Douglas Earl Millersburg 

Auman, Cecilia Beatrice St. Mary's 

Auman, Fred Arthur, Jr. Northumberland 

Aurand, Harold Edward . Selinsgrove 

Bailes, Charles Seiler Shamokin 

Barr, Janet Frances Honey Brook 

Bartuska, Anthony John Nanticoke 

Bell, Joyce LeJeune Mount Union 

Benner, Ned Oliver Sunbury 

Berkey, Ronald R. Windber 

Bernstine, Earl LeRoy Williamsport 

Bilger, Roy Renninger Selinsgrove 

Blough, Virginia Eileen Johnstown 

Bobb, Marlin Oscar Herndon 

Boden, Robert Edward w - Wiconisco 

Bogar, Joseph Edwin „ Liverpool 

Bogar, Robert Franklin A Selinsgrove 

Bollinger, Anna Jane New Oxford 

Bonish, Harry Michael Ashland 

Bowen, James Hepburn Williamsport 

Boyer, Marland Paul Pottsville 

Bresnock, Edward Andrew Ashland 

Brosius, Margietta Elizabeth Rebuck 

Brotherson, Donald Alfred Erie 

Bruley, Virginia Ethel Cliffside Park, N. J. 

Buffington, John Hamilton Bloomfield, N. J. 

Buffington, Wilbur John Elizabethville 

Calvert, Frank Dreshman Ashland 

Campbell, Richard Ernest Sunbury 

Chadwick, Henry Gardner Wildwood, N. J. 

Clark, Theodore H. Prospect Park 

Compton, Frank Valentine Cologne, N. J. 

Conrad, Calvin Harvey, Jr. Sunbury 

Coons, Gerald Franklin \ Reedsville 

Davis, Donald R. Berwick 

Davis, Thomas Roy Shamokin Dam 

Davison, Mary Cady Oriente, Cuba 

Decker, Barbara Ann Melrose Park 

Deppen, Diane Gere Sunbury 

Deppen, Thomas Earl Herndon 

Derr, Donald James Buck Run 

Devine, John Gilbert Ashland 

Diaz, James Coaldale 

Dietterle, Paul Henr^ Jr. Milton 

Dom, Jay Ross ___. Bronxville, N. Y. 

Doran, John Bernai^ J. Downingtown 

Dornbusch, Lillian Dolores J- Linthicum, Md. 

Duncan, Burde A., Jr. Northumberland 

Duncan, Charles Harry Sunbury 

Dunlap, John Robert Abington 



122 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Dunn, Melvin Lucien _^ Enola 

Faddis, P. Elaine Coatesville 

Felker, Richard Eugene Middleburg 

Fetherolf, Anna Lois Freeburg 

Fleming, Ray Edward Northumberland 

Foltz, Chiri Lola Reedsville 

Fopeano, Joan Marie ^ Absecon, N. J. 

Frankenfield, James Raymond Lancaster 

Frankenfield, Robert Madison Lancaster 

Gehris, James Carl Berwick 

Gettel, Dorothy Isabel * Baltimore, Md. 

Gleason, Hanni Corinne Sunbury 

Goetz, Robert Lynwood Millerstown 

Goodling, Ben Leon Middleburg 

Gottschall, Charles Leon Muncy 

Gumble, Doris Evelyn T __^i___ Paupack 

Guyer, Floris Leone i Tipton 

Haffly, Paul Russell Belleville 

Hancock, Dolores Irene i_Jt : Altoona 

Hand, Jay Lamar :__* Muir 

Harris, Denice Elizabeth New Milford 

Heller, Barbara Ann Harrison, N. Y. 

Henderson, Alvin R. Columbus, Ga. 

Hess, Charles Irvin Northumberland 

Hoffman, Suzanne _, Bellefonte 

Hoover, Robert Stewart Elizabethville 

Hort, JoAnn Marie i Sunbury 

Hospodar, John, Jr. __--^l Hazleton 

Howard, Doris Ingrid ffl Prospect Park 

Howling, Roger C. Upper Montclair, N. J. 

Hrkman, Daniel Johnstown 

Hunter, Ruth Elayne Chambersburg 

Hutchison, Marjorie Besse Mount Union 

Jackson, Mary Jane Wildwood, N. J. 

Janson, Doris Elizabeth York 

Jenkins, Thomas Moorman Westfield, N. J. 

Johnson, Robert Joseph Coaldale 

Jones, Paul Roosevelt Shamokin 

Fabler, Jeanne Louise Nazareth 

ivershner, Richard Pawley Tamaqua 

Kirchman, Edward John Milton 

Kline, John Olewine, Jr. Milton 

Mine, Susan Ann : Bloomsburg 

Knecht, Lawrence Richard Sunbury 

Koch, Nancy Lee Manhasset, N. Y. 

Kohlweiss, Gertrude Marie Merrick, N. Y. 

Koontz, Roberta May Meyersdale 

Kost, R. Nelson Mechanicsburg 

Kreisel, Joyce Isabell » McKeesport 

Kundis, Harold Mt. Carmel 

Kunkle, Brady Lewis Port Royal 

Kurlowicz, Edward Alfred Shenandoah 

Lauver, Raymond Christian McAlisterville 

Lease, Pnrb?vra -Jane Somerset 

Leeser, Mildred Reay Sunbury 

Lockwood, Anne Mary Wayne 

Ludwig, Jean Lorraine Selinsgrove 

McCabe, Faye'Ferris Gilberton 



LIST OF STUDENTS 123 

McConnell, John Hugh Jersey City, N. J. 

McHenry, Roy Boyd Berwick 

McKeever, Grace Jane Harrisburg 

Mack, Helen Marie Cornwells Heights 

Madden, Edward Douglas, Jr. ., New York, N. Y. 

Manning, Everett M. East Orange, N. J. 

Meerbach, John Calvin Stratford, Conn. 

Mertz, John Raymond . Bath 

Miller, Mary Julia Honesdale 

Miller, Robert Ardell " Liberty 

Miller, Vernon Jacoby Sunbury 

Mincemoyer, Earl Howard Milton 

Minnich, Donald Martin McKean 

Morris, Charles Albert Harrisburg 

Moyer, Marvin Row Northumberland 

Mussina, Rosemary Milton 

Nicklin, Shirley Alice Marlboro, N. Y. 

Noll, Robert J. J. Selinsgrove 

Orner, Jeanne Marie Bendersville 

Otto, Palmer Wilson Sunbury 

Oyster, Anna Mae , Sunbury 

Pallas, Robert Lee Lewistown 

Paulhamus, Lewis Oliver Selinsgrove 

Pellman, Robert Ernest Shamokin Dam 

Pfeiffer, Edward F. Weatherly 

Phillips, George William Herndon 

Phillips, Merle Herbert L Dalmatia 

Polansky, Helen Bernice Coaldale 

Polk, Helen Hoopes Merchantville, N. J. 

Popken, Janet Louise .. West Orange, N. J. 

Portzline, Abraham Bahner, Jr. Selinsgrove 

Poust, William Howard, Jr. Williamsport 

Powell, Joseph Frank : Ashland 

Price, Marian Jane ^_ Ashland 

Radtke, Elmer Gustav, Jr. , Philadelphia 

Raup, Betty Jane Sunbury 

Raup, Eleanor Elizabeth ^j Coudersport 

Reeder, Doris Jean Elliottsburg 

Reifsnider, Justine Mae , Hanover 

Reitz, John Richard Selinsgrove 

Reuther, John Alfred : Bridgeport, Conn. 

Rhone, Earl Fasold __: _- Sunbury 

Robinson, Zola Ailene Lewistown 

Rohmann, Charles H. Ehrenfeld 

Rothermel, Jean Arlene ! , Klingerstown 

Rowe, Chester Graybill Jj Selinsgrove 

Rowe, Harold Charles Lykens 

Rumbaugh, James Orville Millerstown 

Santangeloy Louis Franklin Northumberland 

Sarba, Mary Elmina Sunbury 

Satzler, Faye Arlene -_ McAlisterville 

Seaman, Gladys. Georgia . Palisades Park, N. J. 

Shaffer, Richard William Selinsgrove 

Sharadin, Harold Leroy Middleburg 

Sheesley, Robert Edwin Lykens 

Shetler, Maria Jane Spring City 

Showalter, Shirley June Millmont 



124 . SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 



Shuey, Mark Wesley __; — % Middletown 

Shunk, Nancy Jane -..* Sunbury 

Smith, Dorothy Ellen / Biglerville 

Smith, Lawrerce M. L Freeburg 

Smith, Lillian Cora _ Nescopeck 

Snyder* Mary Elizabeth Sunbury 

Soloman, Jack Mathew Athens 

Spogen, Marjorie Louise _ Turbotville 

Stahl, Roland Edgar . Northumberland 

Terrel, Audrey Caroline — Waymart 

Teter, Phyllis Ethel Northumberland 

Thomas, George Blair, Jr. Johnstown 

Troutman, Beverly Jane , Norristown 

Troutman, Richard Eugene Pillow 

Troutman, Walter Augustus, Jr. Elizabethville 

LHp, William Edwin -->*-. Northumberland 

Vanderbilt, Justine Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Van Dyke, Willis Baum Lewistown 

Wagner, Richard Keck Selinsgrove 

Watkins, Barbara Jane Scranton 

Webber, John Shamokin 

Wegner, Edith May New Brunswick, N. J. 

Weller, Kent Reginald Aristes 

Welliver, Barbara Sharretts Berwick 

Westervelt, Richard George Bloomfield, N. J. 

Wetzel, Richard Lee Selinsgrove 

\j'"'n«of Barbara I Cedar Grove, N. J. 

Wniiammee. Phyllis Mary Factoryville 

Williams, Donald Dee Sunbury 

Wissinger, Donald Eugene Altoona 

Witowski, John Joseph Keiser 

Wolf, Janet Eileen Johnstown 

Wright, John H. Hazleton 

Yanovkch, George Alfred Nanticoke 

Yeakel, Harold Joseph .. Pottsville 

Yorty, Ann Elizabeth Selinsgrove 

Zimmerman, Harold Clayton __ Sunbury 

7 r . hJag, Elizabeth Charlotte _ __ Englewood, N. J. 

Special Students 

Brosius, Catherine Elizabeth Sunbury 

Edmunds, Rennel Raymond Selinsgrove 

Fisher, Richard Keiser Selinsgrove 

Furman, Harry James Sunbury 

Zubak, John Edward Trafford 

Summer Session 1946 

Unless otherwise noted, these students attended both terms of the 
Summer Session. 

Adams, Donald Lerve* Mifflinburg 

Alessi, Victor Peter Coraopolis 

Apriceno, Louis Paul Berwick 

Barry, Richard Paul Altoona 

Bashore, Donald Ray Selinsgrove 

Bergstresser, John Benjamin Selinsgrove 



LIST OF STUDENTS 125 

Bilger, Aria Mae Kreamer 

Blecher, Jean Elizabeth ■ Danville 

Bloom, Kay Lee Sunbury 

Bollinger, Harold Edward* , Northumberland 

Bollinger, Marlin Raymond Northumberland 

Bomgardner, William Earl Hershey 

Bonish, Harry Michael Ashland 

Bowen, James Hepburn Williamsport 

Bowman, Robert Trone Hanover 

Boyer, Jack Wesley Sunbury 

Boyer, Marland Paul Pottsville 

Boyer, Ronald Herbert* Pillow 

Bringman, Dale S. Hanover 

Brosius, Catherine* Sunbury 

Brotherson, Donald Alfred Erie 

Brown, Ralph Condit, Jr. Bloomfield, N. J. 

Bubb, Robert Neil Milton 

Butts, Harry William, Jr. East Orange, N. J. 

Casner, Vera Dressier (Mrs.)* Mifflin 

Clark, Gayle Virginia Drexel Hill 

Conrad, Calvin Harvey* Sunbury 

Coons, Gerald Franklin Reedsville 

Cooper, George Asbury South Williamsport 

Corcoran, Frank Coraopolis 

Cosgrove, Donald Richard Bloomfield, N. J. 

Davis, Thomas Roy Shamokin Dam 

Davison, Mary Cady Harrisburg 

Day, Gilbert Oliver, Jr. Selinsgrove 

Decker, Doris Arlene* Millheim 

Deitrick, Samuel Charles* Sunbury 

Derr, Aloysius Vincent Ashland 

Dotson, Ruth Garman* Mt. Pleasant Mills 

Duncan, Charles Harry Sunbury 

Eastep, Clair H. Williamsburg 

Edmunds, Rennel Raymond Selinsgrove 

Eisenhauer, Richard Louis* Beavertown 

Felker, Richard Eugene Middleburg 

Fellows, Robert Charles Altoona 

Felton, Helen Grace Elizabeth, N. J. 

Fetterolf, Frank Kinzey Johnstown 

Fisher, Millard George Berwick 

Fisher, Robert Alfred Selinsgrove 

Flock, Allen Williams Sunbury 

Ford, Edward H. Northumberland 

Furman, Harry James** Sunbury 

Ford, Edward H. Northumberland 

Furman, Harry James** Sunbury 

Grandolini, Eugene Paul Scranton 

Gundrum, Eugene Haines Rockwood 

Gustafson, Emil Seivert Pittsburgh 

Heim, J. William Reading 

Hoffman, June Louisa Hazleton 

Hoover, Robert Stewart Elizabethville 

Houser, Stanley Paul Lewistown 

Houtz, Helen Joanne** Selinsgrove 

Hugus, Howard Shannon Selinsgrove 

James, Harry Keithan Philadelphia 

James, Thomas Edison Selinsgrove 



126 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Johnston, Harry Ryan Greensburg 

Kelly, Ella Jean* Goshen, N. Y. 

Kimble, James David South Williamsport 

King, Donald Alvin Sunbury 

Klick, Marie Agnes* Wind Gap 

Kramer, Harold Raymond** Allentown 

Kreps, Julia Arlene* Lewistown 

Krouse, Marlin Philip Shamokin Dam 

Kundis, Harold Mt. Carmel 

Lady, Charles Luther Biglerville 

Latta, Margaret Helen* Lockport, N. Y. 

Leach, John Robert Selinsgrove 

Lehman, Selena Helen** Sunbury 

Leitzel, James Silas, Jr. Richfield 

Lindemann, Richard William Bloomfield, N. J. 

Loss, Kenneth Donald** Middleburg 

Ludwig, Jean Lorraine Selinsgrove 

McConnell, Edith* Perkasie 

Maddocks, Robert Stanley, Jr. Bloomfield, N. J. 

Markey, Hilda Mabel York 

Merz, Kenneth Malcolm Philadelphia 

Milford, James S. Hazleton 

Miller, Edward Egan* Sunbury 

Mingle, Vane Day Selinsgrove 

Mix, Arnold George Bloomfield, N. J. 

Moglia, Richard Daniel Glen Ridge, N. J. 

Morris, Charles Albert Harrisburg 

Mummey, Stanley Henry Sunbury 

Narayan, Ongkar British Guiana 

Neumann, Emil D.** Philadelphia 

Noll, Robert Joseph Selinsgrove 

Orr, Kenneth DeWitt East Orange, N. J. 

Packman, Allan Bernard : Atlantic City, N. J. 

Pethick, Marjorie Marie Honesdale 

Pirie, Warren James Bloomfield, N. J. 

Plock, William Lloyd Sunbury 

Radell, Robert William Williamsport 

Raup, Columbus Hill Sunbury 

Reaver, Mildred Katherine Gettysburg 

Reichard, John Milton Wilkinsburg 

Reilly, James Bernard Lawrence, N. Y. 

Reitz, Daniel Irvin, Jr. Selinsgrove 

Riegel, George Ellsworth, III Williamsport 

Rohmann, Charles H. Ehrenfeld 

Rohrbach, Donald P. Sunbury 

Rothenberg, William Boone Sunbury 

Ruhl, William R. Mifflinburg 

Schnure, Margaret Jane Selinsgrove 

Schreiner, Carol Kathleen Williamstown 

Schueler, Charles Glenn* Bloomfield, N. J. 

Shaffer, Nevin Theodore Northumberland 

Shaffer, Ruth Carolyn Northumberland 

Shannon, Mary Elizabeth* Millheim 

Sharadin, Harold Leroy Middleburg 

Sheetz, Anna Maria* Mt. Carmel 

Sheetz, Wilfred Jack Selinsgrove 

Shroyer, Shirley Irene Sunbury 

Smith, Barbara Frances Sunbury 



LIST OF STUDENTS 127 

Smith, Jane Free* Mifflintown 

Smith, Lawrence M. Freeburg 

Snyder, Charles William Lebanon 

Solomon, Howard Houston* South Williamsport 

Speyer, Gabrielle Pamela* New York, N. Y. 

Steininger, Eugene Beachel Middleburg 

Sternat, Dorothy Louise* Biglerville 

Stetler, Paul B. Middleburg 

Stonesifer, Oscar Stanley, Jr. Harrisburg 

Stow, George Clifford, Jr. Merchantville, N. J. 

Swartz, Barner Schumann* Millerstown 

Tietbohl, Augustus Valentine South Williamsport 

Tietbohl, Ralph Harry, Jr. South Williamsport 

Troutman, Deri Alfred Dornsife 

Troutman, Martha Jayne Elizabethville 

Venner, Charles Aked, III Bloomfield, N. J. 

Weikel, Dexter Neil New Berlin 

Weller, Lawrence John Aristes 

Wilhour, Richard Orville Sunbury 

Williams, Donald Dee Sunbury 

Williams, Russell Henry Sunbury 

Williard, Joseph R. Lewistown 

Wilson, Richard L. Sunbury 

Winter, Robert E. Williamsport 

Wohlsen, Robert Fischer Yonkers, N. Y. 

Wolfe, Fancher Elbert** Shamokin 

Wolfe, Vivian Catherine* Williamstown 

Woodring, Alvin James Bloomsburg 

Yancho, William Philip Morris Plane, N. J. 

Yeakel, Harold Joseph Pottsville 

Zeidler, Frank Albert Bloomfield, N. J. 

Zerbe, Maynard Nelson Sunbury 



•Attended first term only. 
•♦Attended second term only. 

GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION" OF COLLEGE 

STUDENTS ENROLLED IN THE 

REGULAR SESSION 

1946-47 

Bermuda 1 

British Guiana 1 

Connecticut i 3 

Cuba 1 

District of Columbia 1 

Georgia 1 

Maryland 6 

New Jersey 47 

New York 25 

Pennsylvania 376 

Washington 1 

Total 463 



128 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

1946-47 
SUMMARY 

College of Liberal Arts 

M W T 

Senior 21 18 39 

Junior 31 28 59 

Sophomore 57 51 108 

Freshman 111 73 184 

Unclassified 4 15 

224 171 395 

Conservatory of Music 

Senior 5 7 12 

Junior 3 14 17 

Sophomore 5 11 16 

Freshman 12 11 23 

25 43 68 463 

Music Students 24 51 75 538 

Unclassified 

Summer Terms 19 If 6 

First Term 114 29 143 

Second Term 111 17 128 

Names Repeated 119 32 151 120 

Total 658 




PAGE 

Abnormal Psychology 94 

Academic Regulations 49 

Academic Year 54 

Accounting 36 

Administrative Officers and Staff 10 

Admission 49 

Advanced Accounting 65 

Advanced Calculus 88 

Advanced Instrumental Conducting 107 

Advisors, Vocational 34 

Algebra and Geometry (Foundation of) 88 

Alumni Association 113 

American Government 84 

Ancient History 84 

American Literature 77 

Analytic Geometry and Calculus 87 

Anthropology 94 

Applied Psychology 93 

Appointment Bureau 35 

Art 59 

Athletics 20 

Attendance Regulations 53 

Auditing 66 

Awards for 1946 116 

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements 55 

Bachelor of Science Degree Requirements 56 

Bachelor of Science in Music Education 58-102 

Bacteriology 36 

Bible and Religion 60 

Bills (Payment of) 31 

Biology 61 

Boarding Facilities 27 

Board of Directors 8 

Bond and Key 22 

Bookkeeping Teaching Methods 71 

Book Store 28 

Botany 62 

Buildings and Equipment 17 



129 



130 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

PAGE 

Business Administration 63 

Business English 69 

Business Education 37, 47, 63, 69 

Business Mathematics 63 

Business Law 64 

Business Principles 63 

Calendar 4 

Chemistry 67 

Choral Conducting, Advanced 108 

Chorus Class 107 

Psychology of Adolescence 94 

Classification of Students 53 

College Algebra 87 

College Calendar . 5 

College Credit 99 

College Mathematics (Introduction) , 87 

Commercial Curriculum (The) 71 

Commercial Education 69 

Committees of the Faculty 15 

Committee of the Board of Directors 8 

Comparative Anatomy 62 

Conservatory of Music 97 

College Credits 99 

Entrance Credits for Music 97 

Music Education 97 

Pianoforte 110 

Pipe Organ 111 

Rules and Regulations 98 

Singing 110 

Violin 112 

Conservatory Student Organization 97 

Consumer Economics 73 

Contemporary Drama 78 

Cost Accounting 66 

Counterpoint 108 

Courses of Instruction 59-103 

Course Requirements for Degrees 55-101 

Credit Statements 53 

Day Students, Expenses 30 

Deans Honor List 54 

Debating 77-96 

Degrees Conferred in 1946 115 

Description of Courses 104 

Dictation I, II, and III 105-106 

Discipline 22-28 

Economic Geography 72 

Economic History of the U. S. 72 



INDEX 131 

PAGE 

Economics 71 

Education 73 

English 76 

English Drama 78 

English Novel 78 

English Poetry 79 

Enrollment Statistics 127 

Entrance Requirements 49 

Equipment 17 

Events, Special 29 

Exclusion from the University 28 

Expenses 30 

Faculty .'_ 11 

Faculty Committees 15 

Faculty of Conservatory of Music . 14 

Fees, Special 31 

Finance 65 

Foreign Trade 73 

Fraternities 22 

French 79 

French Composition and Conversation 80 

General Science 80 

German 81 

German Composition and Conversation 81 

Government, Student 20 

Graduation Fee 30 

Graduation Requirements 52 

Greek 82 

Gregg Shorthand 69 

Guidance, Educational and Vocational 34 

Gustavus Adolphus Hall 17 

Handbook 20 

Hassinger Memorial Hall 17 

Health Service 26 

Heredity 62 

High School Teaching 38 

Histology 62 

Historical 7 

History and Political Science 83 

History and Principles of Education 74 

Honor List 54 

Honors at Graduation 52 

Housing Facilities 27 

Introduction to Education 74 

Instrumental Courses 103 

Insurance 72 



132 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

PAGE 

Interests 19 

Introduction to Social Work 95 

Journalism 40 

Kappa Delta Phi 23 

Labor Problems 72 

Ladies' Auxiliary 114 

Lanthorn 20 

Latin 85 

Law 40 

Library IS 

Library Science 41 

Location 7 

Machine Accounting 64 

Major and Minor Requirements 51 

Marketing 72 

Marking System 50 

Mathematics 87 

Medical Aid and Nursing Techniques 69 

Medical Ethics 70 

Medical Secretarial 41 

Medical Shorthand 70 

Medical Terminology 69 

Mental Hygiene 93 

Ministry 42 

Money and Banking 72 

Music 89-97 

Music, Opportunities in 27 

Music Degrees Requirements 101 

Music Expenses 100 

National Honor Societies 21 

Navigation 88 

Office Practice 70 

Office Procedure 70 

Omega Delta Sigma 23 

Opportunities in Music and Art 27 

Organic Chemistry 67 

Payment of Bills 31 

Personal Attention 32 

Personal Hygiene 90 

Phi Kappa 21 

Phi Mu Delta 22 

Philosophy 89 

Physical Chemistry 68 

Physical Education 90 

Courses for Men 90 

Courses for Women 91 



INDEX 133 

PAGE 

Physical Therapy Technician 43 

Physics 92 

Pi Gamma Mu 21 

Pianoforte 110 

Pine Lawn 18 

Pipe Organ 111 

Practice Teaching 75 

Practice Teaching, Music 99 

Pre-Dentistry 44 

Pre-Medicine 45 

Pre-Nursing 46 

Pre-Theological Club 22 

Pre- Veterinary 46 

Preparation for a Career 36 

Accounting 36 

Bacteriology 36 

Business Administration 37 

High School Teaching 38 

Law 40 

Library Science 41 

Medical Secretarial 41 

Ministry 42 

Music 43 

Physical Therapy Technician 44 

Pre-Denistry 45 

Pre-Medicine 46 

Pre-Nursing 46 

Pre-Veterinary 46 

Psychology 47 

Secretarial 47 

Social Work 48 

Principles of Economics 71 

Prizes 23 

Psychology 93 

Abnormal Psychology 93 

Applied Psychology 93 

Psychology of Adolescence 94 

Educational Psychology 93 

General Psychology 93 

Educational Tests and Measurements in the Secondary School __ 94 

Social Psychology 94 

Public Speaking 77 

Publications 20 

Purpose and Objectives 16 

Quality Points 50 

Recitals 98 

Recognition by Accrediting Agencies 1 16 

Recreation 19-22 

Refunds 31 

Register, Students 115 



134 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

PAGE 

Registration 50 

Regulations 49 

Religion, Courses in 60-61 

Religious Life 19 

Reports on Grades 53 

Requirements for Admission 49 

Requirements for Graduation 52 

Requirements for Degrees 55 

Residence Requirements 53 

Resident Student Expenses 30 

Romance Languages: 

French 79-80 

Latin 85-87 

Spanish 95, 96 

Scholarship Grants 28 

Scholarships 24 

Scholastic Regulations 51 

Science, Bachelor of 56, 57 

Science, General 80 

Science, Library 41 

Secondary Education 39 

Secretarial Course 47 

Secretarial, Medical 41 

Semesters, Summary of 5, 6 

Shorthand 69, 70 

Singing 110 

Social Life 19 

Social Work 48 

Sociology 94 

Sororities 22 

Spanish 95 

Special Events 29 

Special Fees 31 

Special Interest Clubs 21 

Speech 96 

Staff, Administrative Officers and 10 

Statistics on Enrollment 116 

Student Classification 53 



OFFICE OF THE DEAN 

SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

SELlMSGROVE, PA. 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 



BULLETIN 




CATALOGUE ISSUE 1947-1948 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 1948-49 



SELINSGROVE 



PENNSYLVANIA 



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SEIBERT HALL 



Susquehanna University 
Bulletin 



NO. I 

JANUARY-MARCH 

SERIES XL.V 



Catalogue Number 




ACADEMIC RECORD 1947-48 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 1948-49 



Published quarterly by Susquehanna University, Selinsgrove, Pennsyl- 
vania, and entered as second-class matter at Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania, 
January 1, 1923, under Act of Congress of August 24, 1912. 







CALENDAR 


1948 






JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


S M T W T 
1 
4 5 6 7 8 
11 12 13 14 15 
18 19 20 21 22 
25 26 27 28 29 


F 
2 

9 

16 
23 
30 


s 

3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


S 
1 
8 

15 
22 
29 


M T W T F 
2 3 4 5 6 
9 10 11 12 13 
16 17 18 19 20 
23 24 25 26 27 


s 

7 

14 
21 
28 


S 

7 

14 
21 

28 


M 

1 
8 
15 
22 
29 


T W T F S 
2 3 4 5 6 
9 10 11 12 13 
16 17 18 19 20 
23 24 25 26 27 
30 31 


APRIL 


MAY 


JUNE 


1 
4 5 6 7 8 
11 12 13 14 15 
18 19 20 21 22 
25 26 27 28 29 


2 

9 

16 
23 
30 


3 
10 
17 

24 


2 

9 
16 
23 
30 


3 4 5 6 7 
10 11 12 13 14 
17 18 19 20 21 
24 25 26 27 28 
31 


1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


6 

13 
20 
27 


12 3 4 5 
7 8 9 10 11 12 
14 15 16 17 18 19 
21 22 23 24 25 26 
28 29 30 


JULY 




AUGUST 


7 

14 
21 
28 


SEPTEMBER 


1 

4 5 6 7 8 
11 12 13 14 15 
18 19 20 21 22 

25 26 27 28 29 


2 
9 

16 
23 
30 


3 

10 
17 
24 
31 


1 

8 

15 
22 
29 


2 3 4 5 6 
9 10 11 12 13 
16 17 18 19 20 
23 24 25 26 27 
30 31 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 

13 
20 
27 


12 3 4 

7 8 9 10 11 
14 15 16 17 18 
21 22 23 24 25 
28 29 30 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 lfi 
17 18 19 20 21 22 4§g 
24 25 26 27 28 29 3tf 
31 


7 

14 
21 
28 


12 3 4 5 6 
8 9 10 11 12 13 
15 16 17 18 19 20 
22 23 24 26^2S27 
29 30 


5 

12 
19 
26 


6 


12 3 4 

7 8 9 10 11 


13 
20 

27 


14 15 yS 17 18 
21 22 23 24 25 
28 29 30 31 






CALENDAR 


1949 






JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


S M T W T 

2X456 
9 10 11 12 13 
- 16 17 18 19 20 
23 24 25 27 27 
30 31 


F 

7 

14 
21 
28 


s 

i 

8 
15 
22 
29 


S 

6 
13 

20 
27 


M T W T F 
12 3 4 
7 8 9 10 11 
14 15 16 17 18 
21 22 23 24 25 
28 


s 

5 

12 
19 
26 


S 

6 

13 
20 

27 


M 

7 

14 
21 
28 


T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 
8 9 10 11 12 

15 16 17 18 19 

22 23 24 25 26 

29 30 31 


APRIL 


MAY 


JUNE 


3 4 5 6 7 
10 11 12 13 14 
17 18 19 20 21 
24 25 26 27 28 


1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


2 
9 
16 
23 
30 


1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


2 3 4 5 6 

9 10 11 12 13 
16 17 18 19 20 
23 24 25 26 27 
30 31 


7 

14 
21 
28 


5 

12 
19 
26 


6 

13 
20 
27 


12 3 4 
7 8 9 10 11 
14 15 16 17 18 
21 22 23 24 25 
28 29 30 





COLLEGE CALENDAR 



SECOND SEMESTER 1947-48 

January 24-26 inclusive 

(Saturday-Monday) Mid- Year Vacation 

January 27 and 28 

Tuesday and Wednesday Registration for Second 

Semester 

January 29, Thursday, 8 :00 a. m. College Exercises Open on 

Regular Schedule 

March 2, Tuesday Academic Recognition Day 

March 24, Wednesday, noon Easter Recess Begins 

March 30, Tuesday, 1:20 p. m. College Classes Resume 

May 8, Saturday Sub-Ereshman Day and May 

Day 

May 22, Saturday Alumni Day 

May 23, Sunday Baccalaureate Service 

May 24, Monday Commencement Day 

SUMMER TERM 1948 

June 15, Tuesday Registration 

June 16, Wednesday Classes Begin 

July 5, Monday Independence Day, Holiday 

August 7, Saturday Summer Term Ends 

FIRST SEMESTER 1948-49 

September 11, Saturday Freshman Orientation Pro- 
gram Begins 



5 



6 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

September 14, Tuesday Freshman Registration 

September 15, Wednesday Registration of Other Classes 

September 16, Thursday Registration Continues 

September 17, Friday, 9:00 a.m. Matriculation Day Exercises 

September 17, Friday, 10:10 a.m. College Exercises Open on 

Regular Schedule 

September 17, Friday, 8:00 p.m. Faculty Reception to Students 

September 25, Saturday Parents' Day 

October 16, Saturday Homecoming, Holiday 

November 24, Wednesday, noon Thanksgiving Recess Begins 

November 29, Monday, 1 :20 p. m. College Classes Resume 

December 16, Thursday, noon Christmas Recess Begins 

January 3, Monday, 1 :20 p. m. College Classes Resume 

January 21, Friday Semester Ends 

SECOND SEMESTER 1948-49 

January 22-24 inclusive (Saturday- 
Monday) Mid- Year Vacation 

January 25-26, Tuesday and Wednesday Registration for Second 

Semester 

January 27, Thursday, 8:00 a.m. College Classes Open on Reg- 
ular Schedule 

March 1, Tuesday Academic Recognition Day 

April 13, Wednesday, noon Easter Recess Begins 

April 19, Tuesday, 1:20 p.m. College Classes Resume 

Mav 7, Saturday Sub-Freshman Day and May 

Day 

May 21, Saturday Alumni Day 

May 22, Sunday Baccalaureate Service 

May 23, Monday Commencement Day 




PINE LAWN 



AERIAL VIEW OF SUSQUEHANNA CAMPUS 



THE LIBRARY- 
CONSERVATORY OF 
MUSIC 



MEN'S ATHLETIC FIELD 

SELINSGROVE HALL 



HASSINGER HALL 
GUSTAVUS ADOLPHUS HALL 
SEIFERT HALL 



MENS TENNIS COURTS 

HEATING PLANT 
ALUMNI GYMNASIUM 
WOMEN'S ATHLETIC FIELD 
STEELE SCIENCE HALL 



Susquehanna University had its beginning as Missionary Institute, 
the corner-stone of which was laid on September 1, 1858. The 
founder was the Reverend Dr. Benjamin Kurtz, an eminent divine 
of the Lutheran Church of his day. The school was established to 
supply the need for more ministers. From this original motive it 
has broadened its scope to include the preparation of young men and 
young women for all honorable vocations in life, never ceasing to 
emphasize the necessity of the Christian ethic in all true education. 
In 1895, its corporate name was changed to Susquehanna Uni- 
versity. Born in faith, organized and promoted through prayer, it 
has grown steadily to its present strength. 

The following men have served as presidents : 

1858-1865 Benjamin Kurtz, D.D., LL.D. 

1865-1881 Henry Zeigler, D.D. 

1881-1893 Peter Born, D.D. 

1893-1895 Franklin P. Manhart, D.D., LL.D. 

1895-1899 J. E. Dimm, D.D., LL.D. 

1899-1901 C. W Heisler, D.D. 

1901-1902 John I. Woodruff, Litt.D., LL.D., Acting 
President 

1902-1904 G. W. Enders, D.D. 

1904-1905 J. B. Focht, D.D. 

1905-1927 Charles T. Aikens, D.D. 

1928- G. Morris Smith, A.M., D.D., LL.D. 

LOCATION 

Susquehanna University is located at Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania, 
a town of three thousand inhabitants, five miles south of Sunbury 
and forty-five miles north of Harrisburg. The campus of sixty-two 
acres adjoins the borough limits. Selinsgrove is easily reached by 
bus connection from Sunbury, which is a main stop on the Williams- 
port division of the Pennsylvania Railroad. The Reading trains 
from Philadelphia and New York also stop at Sunbury, while 
Northumberland, seven miles from the campus, is the terminus of 
the Lackawanna Railroad from Scranton and the north. Those 
coming by motor may use Route 11, the Susquehanna Trail, or Route 
522 from Lewistown and the west. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



OFFICEKS OF THE BOARD 

William M. Rearick, A.M., D.D. President 

Rev. John F. Harkins, A.M., D.D. First Vice-President 

Claude G. Aikens, B.S. Second Vice-President 

Frank A. Eyer Secretary-Treasurer 

Hon. Charles Steele, A.M. Endowment Treasurer 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

G. Morris Smith, President 

Frank A. Eyer Dan Smith, Jr. 

Dan R. Erdman Hon. Charles Steele 

J. P. Carpenter, Esq. J. D. Bogar, Jr. 

W. M. Rearick 

MEMBERS 
Term Expires 1952 

J. P. Carpenter, Esq., A.B., A.M. Sunbury, Pa. 

Rev. H. W. Miller, D.D., 1010 Elmira St Williamsport, Pa. 

Rev. John F. Harkins, A.M., D.D. State College, Pa. 

Dan Smith, Jr., 225 E. Third St Williamsport, Pa. 

J. D. Bogar, Jr. Harrisburg, Pa. 

Joseph G. Streamer Downingtown, Pa. 

Term Expires 1951 

Rev. L. Stoy Spangler Newport, Pa. 

Charles A. Nicely Watsontown, Pa. 

Rev. G. B. Harman Duncansville, Pa. 

F. E. Ehrenfeld, B.S. Philipsburg, Pa. 

8 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 9 

Term Expires 1950 

Claude G. Aikens, B.S. State College, Pa. 

Frank A. Eyer Selinsgrove, Pa. 

G. Morris Smith, A.M., D.D., LL.I). Selinsgrove, Pa. 

John Peters, 1320 E. Third St. Williamsport, Pa. 

John A. Apple Sunbury, Pa. 

Dan E. Erdman Sunbury, Pa. 

Term Expires 191+9 

M. P. Moller, Jr., B.S. Hagerstown, Md. 

William M. Rearick, A.M., D.D. Mifflinburg, Pa. 

L. S. Landes, M.D., 454 W. Market St. York, Pa. 

Hon. Charles Steele, A.M. Northumberland, Pa. 

Hon. John A. Hoober, LL.B., D.C.L. 

124 E. Market St., York, Pa. 

Term Expires 191+8 

Rev. Ross H. Stover, D.D., LL.D., 6409 1ST. Sixth St 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

J. Prank Thompson, E. Market and Kershaw Sts. York, Pa. 

Rev. H. Clay Bergstresser Hazleton, Pa. 

G. D. Krumrine State College, Pa. 

P. M. Headings Lewistown, Pa. 

W. Alfred Streamer 7334 Rural Lane, Philadelphia, Pa. 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 
AND STAFF 

1947-48 

G. Morris Smith, A.M., D.D., LLJD. President 

Russell Galt, Ph.D. Dean 

Hazel Beatty, B.A., Litt.M. Dean of Women 

Isabel Nicely Secretary of Admissions 

Hilda G. Kolpin, B.S., B.S. in Lib. Sci. Librarian 

Hilda E. Runyon, B.A., B.S. in Lib. Sci. Assistant Librarian 

Ernest T. Yorty Business Manager 

E. Beatrice Herman, A.B. Bursar 

Edwin Monroe Brungart, A.M. Superintendent of Buildings 

and Grounds 

Mrs. Anna Miller Humphrey Dietitian 

Bertha M. Hein, R. N. Assistant to the Dean of Women 

Athalia T. Kline, A.M. Faculty Resident in the Cottage 

Mrs. Carol Kline, A.B. Preceptress in Hassinger Hall 

Janet Rohrbach, B.S. Secretary to the President 

Ruth E. McCorkill, B.S. Business Secretary 

Arla M. Bilger Secretary to the Dean 

Sister Mary Jane Jessen Student Assistant in Hassinger Hall 

Sis«psr Lillian Hoover Student Assistant in Seibert Hall 



10 



THE FACULTY 



1947-1948 

G. Morris Smith President 

A.B., Roanoke College 1911; A.M., Princeton University 1912; 
Diploma, Lutheran Theological Seminary, Philadelphia 1919; D.D., 
Roanoke College 1928; Graduate study, Columbia University; 
LL.D., Bucknell 1940. 

Russell Galt Dean of the College 

A.B., Muskingum College 1919; A.M. 1920 and Ph.D. 1936, Colum- 
bia University; School of Oriental Studies, Cairo, Egypt, 1920-22. 

John Irwin Woodruff Professor Emeritus of Philosophy 

Diploma, Missionary Institute 1888; A.B. 1890 and A.M. 1893, 
Bucknell University; Litt.D., Wittenberg College 1903; LL.D., 
Waynesburg College 1921. 

George Elmer Fisher Professor Emeritus of Chemistry 

Diploma, Missionary Institute 1888; Ph.B., Bucknell University 
1891; Ph.D., Illinois Wesleyan University 1905. 

Theodore William Kretschmann Professor Emeritus of Bible 

and Religion 
A.B., 1888, A.M. and B.D., 1891, University of Pennsylvania; 
Diploma Lutheran Theological Seminary, Philadelphia 1891; Ph.D., 
University of Pennsylvania 1892. 

George Franklin Dunkelberger Professor Emeritus of Education 

and Psychology 
A.B., Susquehanna University 1908; A.M., University of Pitts- 
burgh 1919; Pd.D., Susquehanna University 1921; Ph.D., New York 
University 1927; Graduate study, Columbia University. 

Augustus William Ahl Professor of Greek 

Diploma, Gymnasium and Seminary, Breklum, Germany, 1908; 
A.M., Susquehanna University 1912; Ph.D., Vanderbilt Univer- 
sity 1920; Graduate study, Peabody College for Teachers, Nash- 
ville, Tenn. 

Arthur Herman Wilson Professor of English 

A.B. 1927, A.M. 1929, and Ph.D. 1931, University of Pennsylvania. 

William Adam Russ, Jr. Professor of History and Political Science 
A.B., Ohio Wesleyan 1924; A.M., University of Cincinnati 1926; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago 1933. 

11 



12 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Russell Wieder Gilbert Professor of German 

A.B., Muhlenberg College 1927; A.M. 1929 and Ph.D. 1943, Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania. 

Amos Alonzo Stagg Advisory Coach 

A.B., Yale University, 1888; Graduate of International Y. M. C. A. 
College, Springfield, Mass., 1891; M. P. E., International Y. M. C. A. 
College, 1912; A.M., Oberlin College, 1923; LL.D., College of 
Wooster, 1933; Graduate study, Yale University. 

Amos Alonzo Stagg, Jr. Professor of Physical Education 

Ph.B., 1923 and A.M., 1935, University of Chicago; A.M., Columbia 
University 1941; Graduate study, University of Chicago. 

Fisk William Stocking Scudder Professor of Biology 

A.B., Ohio Wesleyan University 1923; Ohio Wesleyan University 
1924-25; Ph.D., Cornell University 1938. 

John Jacob Houtz Associate Professor of Chemistry and Mathematics 
A.B., Susquehanna University 1908; M.S., Louisiana State Univer- 
sity 1912; ScD., Carthage College 1933. 

George Merritt Robison Associate Professor of Mathematics 

A.B. 1916, M. A. 1917, and Ph.D. 1919, Cornell University. 

Grover C. T. Graham Associate Professor of Economics and 

Business Administration 

A.B., William Jewell College 1909; A.M., Brown University 1910; 
Graduate study, Brown University. 

Kenneth Buell Waterbury Assistant Professor of 

Education and Psychology 

B.S. 1930, M.Ed. 1933, and Ed.D. 1939, Pennsylvania State College. 

Frederick Clement Stevens Assistant Professor in Sociology 

and History 

A.B., University of Minnesota 1926; M.A., Columbia University 
1932; Graduate study, Columbia University. 

WALDEMAR ZAGARS Assistant Professor in Economics 

and Business Administration 

Dr. of Economics, University of Riga, Latvia, 1931. 

Thomas F. Armstrong, Jr. Assistant Professor of Business 

Administration 

B.S., Wesleyan University 1928; M.B.A., Harvard University 1930; 
Ed.D., Temple University 1947. 

Benjamin Lotz Assistajit Professor in Religion and 

Philosophy 

A.B., Wittenberg College 1923; B.D., Philadelphia Seminary 1928. 

Lenora ALLISON Instructor in Commercial Education 

A.B., Bowling Green College of Commerce 1930; M. Ed., University 
of Pittsburgh 1937. 



THE FACULTY 13 

Athalia Tabitha Kline Instructor in French and Spanish 

A.B., Randolph Macon Woman's College 1922; A.M., Duke Uni- 
versity 1925. 

Robert Francis Whitton Meader Instructor in Latin and English 

A.B., Middlebury College 1929; M.A., University of Pennsylvania 
1931; Graduate study, Harvard University. 

Merle Vincent Hoover Instructor in Physics 

A.B., Susquehanna University 1941; A.M., George Washington Uni- 
versity 1946; Graduate study, The Pennsylvania State College, 
Georgetown University. 

Axel Reinhart Kleinsorg Instructor in English and Dramatics 

B.S., Temple University 1935; Graduate study, State University of 
Iowa, Temple University. 

Richard Dehne Strathmeyer Instructor in Accounting and 

Business Administration 
B.S., Drexel Institute of Technology 1943; Graduate study, Drexel 
Institute of Technology. 

Ruth Maebelle Sparhawk Instructor in Physical Education 

B.S., Kent State University 1945. 

John William Hoffman Instructor in Science 

A.B., Susquehanna University 1940. 

Janet Stamm Instructor in English and French 

B.A., Mount Holyoke College 1935. 

Hazel R. Beatty Dean of Women and Lecturer in Education 

A.B. 1938 and M.Ed. 1947, University of Pittsburgh; Graduate 
study, University of Wisconsin, University of Michigan. 

Bertha Mabel Hein Lecturer in Medical Secretarial Subjects 

Diploma, Allentown Hospital Training School for Nurses 1908; 
R. N., Pennsylvania State Board for Registration of Nurses 1909; 
Diploma, Baltimore Lutheran Deaconess Training School 1924. 

Hilda G. Kolpin Lecturer in Library Science 

B.S., New York State Teachers College 1927; B.S. in Lib. Sci., 
Syracuse University 1929; Graduate Study, University of Wiscon- 
sin, University of Illinois. 

John Edward Zubak Assistant Coach 

A.B., Susquehanna University 1943. 



CONSEKVATOKY OF MUSIC 

Edwin Sheldon* Director of Conservatory of Music, 

Professor of Pianoforte, Music Form, Canon-Fugue 

Graduate, New England Conservatory of Music 1900; Graduate, 

New York University 1921; Mus.M., Susquehanna University 1908; 

Mus.D., Susquehanna University 1939. 



♦Deceased Dec. 10, 1947. 



14 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Pehcy Mathias Linebaugh Professor of Pipe Organ, 

Pianoforte, Counterpoint 
Mus.B., Lebanon Valley College 1917; Graduate study, New York 
University, Peabody Conservatory of Music. 

Russell Condran Hatz Assistant Professor of Violin, Harmony, 

Band, Orchestra 
B.S. in Music Education, Lebanon Valley College 1937; Graduate 
study, Temple University, Juilliard Institute; A.M., Columbia 
University 1942. 

Ida Maneval Sheldon Instructor in History of Music 

Mus.B., Susquehanna University 1907; Graduate study, New York 
University. 

Mary Kathryn Potteiger Instructor in Pianoforte, Sight Singing 

Mus.B., Susquehanna University 1925; Graduate study, New York 
University. 

Alice Holmen Giauque Instructor in Public School Music Methods, 

Music Appreciation 

B.S. in Music Education 1937 and A.M. 1940, Columbia University. 

Elbert Dixon Haskins Instructor in Singing, Choral Conducting 

A.B., University of Michigan 1923; A.M., New York University 
1939; Graduate study with Bianca Randall, Paris, France, with 
Paul Althouse, New York City, and at Feagin School of Dramatic 
Art, New York City. 

Nancy Bowman Hatz Instructor in Harmony, Band Instruments 

B.S. in Music Education, Lebanon Valley College 1936; A.M., 
Columbia University 1941. 

Allen Flock Instructor in Band Instruments 

B.S., Susquehanna University 1947. 

Ralph Huntington Sidway Instructor in Voice 

New England Conservatory 1934; Paris Conservatoire 1936. 

Frederic Calvin Billman Instructor in Piano and Theory 

Mus.B., Susquehanna University 1936; M.A., Columbia University 
1941; Graduate study, Juilliard Institute 1946-7. 



FACULTY COMMITTEES 



1947-1948 

Admission and Student Standing 
Galt, Gilbert, Graham, Nicely, Russ, Scudder, Sheldon, Wilson 

Catalogue and Curriculum 
Galt, Nicely, Waterbury 

Library 
Kolpin, Russ, Wilson 

Physical Education and Athletics 
Galt, Smith, Stagg, Yorty 

Public Events 
Allison, Gilbert, Linebaugh, Russ, Sheldon 

Publications 
Graham, Meader, Yorty 

Religious Life 
Ahl, Hein, Smith 

Social Affairs 
Beatty, Galt, Gilbert, Hatz, Hein, Stagg 

Teacher Education 
Allison, Galt, Russ, Sheldon, Waterbury, Wilson 

15 



PURPOSE AND OBJECTIVES 



The purpose of Susquehanna University is to provide for 
its students adequate educational facilities, and competent 
Christian scholars as teachers who shall create an environ- 
ment and an atmosphere conducive to the production of 
Christian character. The curricular objectives are the offer- 
ing of liberal arts courses that shall issue in a deep, broad- 
based, well-rounded culture, and of opportunity for technical 
and vocational education in the fields of business, commerce, 
and music. Susquehanna University desires to see in its 
students true scholarship interpenetrated with a genuine 
Christian faith. 



RECOGNITION BY ACCREDITING AGENCIES 

Susquehanna University is recognized officially as a 
four-year liberal arts college by the following accredit- 
ing agencies : 

1. The Middle States Association of Colleges 
and Secondary Schools. 

2. The Pennsylvania State Department of 
Public Instruction. 

3. The University of the State of New York (State Edu- 
cation Department). 

Susquehannn University is also a member of the As- 
sociation of American Colleges and the American 
I 'ouncil of Education. 



16 



BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 



In its campus development and the addition of new buildings, 
Susquehanna University is following a carefully wrought-out plan. 
On the campus of more than sixty-two acres, there are at present 
sixteen brick buildings : 

Selinsgrove Hall was the first building on the campus. It was built 
in 1858 very largely through the generosity of the people of Selinsgrove 
and vicinity. During the days of Missionary Institute, from 1858 to 
1895, it was the only building on the campus, and contained a dormitory 
for men, classrooms, literary society halls, and a chapel. Selinsgrove 
Hall is a substantial three-story brick building. Today, the first floor 
accommodates the administrative offices, and the second and third floors 
serve as a dormitory for the men students. 

Seibert Memorial Hall is a commodious three-story brick building 
in the colonial style of architecture. It was erected in 1901-1902. On 
the first floor are located the reception hall, the social parlors, the chapel, 
and dining room. The second and third floors serve as the dormitory for 
the women students. In the basement are found the dispensary, the day 
students' room, the sorority rooms, and a large social room. The building 
was named in honor of Samuel Seibert, of Hagerstown, Maryland, by the 
provisions of whose will the University received $20,000. This munifi- 
cent gift from the Seibert Estate was made possible very largely through 
the efforts of Dr. S. W. Owen, of Hagerstown, 'Maryland, the President 
of the Board of Trustees at the time. The Moller three-manual pipe 
organ in the chapel was presented to the University by William A. 
Hassinger in memory of his wife, Mrs. Almeda M. Hassinger. 

Hassinger Memorial Hall is a modern brick fireproof dormitory. 
Dedicated June 13, 1921, it was erected substantially through the gifts 
of the family of Martin Luther Hassinger, a former director of the 
college. It has four floors, with a number of rooms arranged as suites. 
It is modern in its appointments. Hassinger Hall has been completely 
renovated and is being used as a residence for women. 

Gustavus Adolphns Hall is a large building of red brick, containing 
lecture rooms, and the offices, classrooms, and laboratories of the Depart- 
ment of Business. This is the oldest building now used for classroom 
purposes, having been completed and dedicated on February 15, 1895. 
It was originally built to house the theological seminary, not now in 
existence, and contained at one time the college administrative offices, 
student rooms, and chapel. In 1928 it was remodeled to accommodate 
the Department of Business, and the administrative offices were moved 
to the first floor of Selinsgrove Hall. 

Steele Science Hall was completed and dedicated on June 10, 1913. 
It was built largely through the gifts of the Hon. Charles Steele, other 
directors of the Board, and friends of the college. It contains the chem- 

17 



18 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

istry, physics, biology, and psychology laboratories, and a large amphi- 
theatre for laboratory demonstrations. This room contains a motion 
picture screen and projectors for both still and motion pictures. 

The Alumni Gymnasium. The present modern gymnasium was dedi- 
cated on June 3, 1935, and replaced an older building which had been 
destroyed by fire. The money for its construction was raised under the 
leadership of President G. Morris Smith through trustee, faculty, and 
alumni subscriptions, as well as from friends of the college. For full 
description of this building, see page 26. 

The Library, striking in its simplicity, was dedicated on June 8, 1928. 
It is the first unit of a larger library which is planned for the future. 

The Conservatory of Music. A three-story building, originally the 
home of Dr. Jonathan R. Dimm, a former president of the institution, 
was made over for conservatory use in 1921. Additions to it were built 
in 1925-26. It contains classrooms and individual practice rooms. 
Through the efforts of Mr. M. P. Moller, Sr., who was a member of the 
Board of Directors for twenty years, a Moller two-manual pipe organ 
was installed in the conservatory. 

The Cottage, located on the campus, serves as a girls' dormitory 
annex to Seibert Memorial Hall. 

Pine Lawn is the president's house. 

Four Duplex Faculty Residences. 

Central Heating Plant. 

Laundry. 

THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 

To supplement the instruction in the various courses, the univer- 
sity library, housed in a colonial, fire-proof building, erected in 1928, 
functions as a reference library of more than 26,615 volumes and 
nearly 3,000 volumes of bound magazines, to which additions are 
made constantly. The library is classified and arranged according 
to the Dewey decimal system, and contains both supplementary 
material and an adequate collection of the standard reference tools. 

The library is open from 8 :00 a. m. to 12 noon, 1 :10 to 5 p. m., 
and 7 to 10 p. m., Monday through Friday; Saturday from 8 :00 a. m. 
to 12 noon, and from 1 to 3 p. m. 

Books, except reference and those on the reserve shelves, may 
circulate for two-week periods. Reference books and magazines may 
not be taken from the library. Reserve books may be taken out from 
10 p. m. to 8 a. m. Monday through Friday and at other periods when 
the building is closed. 

The library receives regularly about 150 periodicals, both for 
scholastic and recreational reading, three daily newspapers, one local 
weekly newspaper, the standard index services, and many other col- 
lege publications. The library contains also the Wilt Music collec- 
tion, a bequest of several thousand books of value to music students. 
It contains also about six hundred volumes of biography and about 
eleven hundred volumes of fiction. 

Freshmen are given ten hours of instruction in the basic tools 
of the library and the technique of using them through independent 
research. 



fC k 




- 



V ^ 



* 



\ 




LIBRARY 



STUDENT INTEREST 



EELIGIOUS LIFE 

Education without religion is incomplete. Susquehanna stands for 
the steady and consistent cultivation of the religious life. Each 
student is required to take the credit courses in religion as provided 
in the curriculum, and to avail himself of the opportunities offered 
for spiritual development. He is expected to attend chapel and 
church regularly. Any student who persistently refuses to accom- 
modate himself to these opportunities for spiritual development may 
be asked to withdraw from the college. 

Open to all students, the Student Christian Association carries 
on a voluntary religious program throughout the year. By the 
example of their own lives, members seek to lead others to the full 
expression of their personalities and, through friendship, to acquaint 
new students with the ideals of college life. 

Mid-week devotional services and Sunday vespers are conducted 
under the auspices of the Student Christian Association. 

SOCIAL LIFE 

Susquehanna University, being a coeducational institution, seeks 
to supply a normal, natural development amid refined and cultural 
surroundings. The social life is under the control of a faculty com- 
mittee. All social events, with chaperons specifically named, must 
receive the approval of the faculty social committee before being 
carried out. A financial budget for each event must be submitted in 
advance for approval by the social committee before any contracts 
may be made. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND ACTIVITIES 

Student organizations may be formed by having their constitu- 
tions and by-laws approved in advance by the administration and 
faculty. All changes in the existing constitution and by-laws must 
also be approved. All college organizations (except those maintain- 
ing dormitories or dining halls) which collect dues or assessments or 
raise money otherwise for any purpose are required to keep their 
funds on deposit with the office of the bursar, thus securing a com- 
plete and accurate accounting for all funds received and spent. This 

19 



20 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

procedure is not designed to relieve the organization officers of any 
responsibility. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

Student government operates on the campus of Susquehanna 
University through five organizations : the Men's Student Council, 
the Women's Cooperative Council, the "Women's Athletic Association, 
the Intersorority Council and the Fraternity Senate. 

In all of these organizations efforts are made to initiate student 
representatives into the problems of democratic group control. There 
is vested in these organizations as much direction of campus affairs 
as students are normally able to carry successfully. These organiza- 
tions provide a practice ground for cooperation between the student 
body and the administration, which must carry the final legal respon- 
sibility for the policies of the institution. 

The form of student government followed in most of these organ- 
izations is that of a relatively large number of student representa- 
tives working with one faculty adviser. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

The Student Handbook serves as a guide and reference book 
to incoming students and especially to freshmen. It is published 
mainly through the Student Christian Association. 

The Susquehanna is the weekly, undergraduate newspaper and 
offers any student with the desire to see himself (herself) in print a 
good chance to take part in the various phases of journalism : head- 
line writing, newspaper make-up, straight news, features, sports, 
general reporting, and editing. Academic credit is optional. 

The Lanthorn is issued annually by members of the junior 
class. It contains a record of college life portrayed by pictures, 
prose, and poetry. 

ATHLETICS 

Amateur standards are maintained in football, field hockey, 
basketball, track, baseball, and tennis. In each of these activities, 
teams are maintained and a healthy spirit prevails. Team members 
and representatives command respect on every field for manliness, 
good sportsmanship, and athletic performance. Letters are awarded 
to members of varsity teams under rules of the athletic committee, 
and suitable letters or insignia of recognition are awarded to suc- 
cessful teams or competitors in minor and intra-mural sports and 
activities. The Varsity "S M Club is an organization of men Avho 
have won the "S" in athletics. 

The Women's Athletic Association has as its purpose the pro- 



STUDENT INTEREST 21 

motion of women's athletics, sports, and activities. It stimulates 
interest in physical efficiency and maintenance of ideals and good 
sportsmanship. 

NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETIES 

Tatt Kappa Alpha is a national honorary forensic fraternity, 
founded for the purpose of giving recognition to those who have 
attained high honors in the field of public speaking and debating. 
The Susquehanna chapter, chartered in 1930, is one of more than a 
hundred chapters in the United States. 

Pi Gamma Mtj is a national social science honor society consist- 
ing of 130 chapters with a membership of over 19,000, established to 
encourage and reward undergraduate interest in the social studies. 
The Pennsylvania Gamma Chapter was established in 1927 and has 
a membership of 185, including members of the faculty, alumni, and 
undergraduates. Members are selected on the following basis : 
evidence of special interest in social studies, at least twenty semester 
hours in the social studies, a "B" average in all social studies, a high 
scholastic standing, and good character. 

Sigma Alpha Iota Fraternity is a national music fraternity 
for women. The Susquehanna chapter, chartered in 1927, is one of 
the sixty-four chapters in the United States. Its purpose is to pro- 
mote high standards of professional scholarship, ethics, and culture, 
and to bring about a closer relationship among those pursuing some 
phase of music as a profession. 

Alpha Psi Omega is a national dramatic fraternity consisting 
of 198 chapters, organized for the purpose of providing an honor 
society for those doing a high standard of work in dramatics and 
incidentally, through the expansion of Alpha Psi Omega among the 
colleges of the United States and Canada, providing a wider fellow- 
ship for those in the college theatre. The Susquehanna chapter, 
Theta Phi, was chartered in 1941. 

SPECIAL INTEREST CLUBS 

Students with similar interests meet in organizations — usually 
once a month — and at such times programs, concerts, tours, or special 
meetings are conducted. 

The Biemic Society is maintained to further the interests of 
students in biology, chemistry, and physics, and presents programs 
prepared by members or by visitors, qualified on scientific subjects. 

Phi Kappa is an organization of students who are interested in 
the cultivation of a proper appreciation of the Greek language and 
culture. At their meetings, papers prepared by the members are 
presented, and a social hour usually follows. 



22 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

The Pre-Theological Club is an organization of students who 
are preparing to enter the study of the Christian ministry. Its aim 
is to foster the spiritual life on the campus. Faculty members and 
ministers are frequently invited to speak to the group. 

The Business Society is an organization of students enrolled in 
the departments of business education .and business administration. 
The Society endeavors to promote discussions of problems relating 
to education and business; to continue the building of a scholarship 
fund to aid worthy students; to inspire and encourage students to 
attain higher scholastic achievement ; and to establish a closer fellow- 
ship among its members through social activities. 

The musical organizations are the University Chorus, Sym- 
phonic Society, and the Bands. Each, of these organizations holds 
regular practice periods and rehearsals, and sponsors or gives public 
performances. Each group is encouraged and supported by the 
Conservatory of Music. 

SOCIAL FRATERNITIES AND SOROKITIES 

There are three social fraternities for men : Bond and Key, 
Theta Chi (Beta Omega chapter), and Phi Mu Delta (Mu Alpha 
chapter). Each has a home near the campus. 

There are two social sororities for women : Kappa Delta Phi and 
Omega Delta Sigma. 

These organizations have been granted certain privileges by the 
Board of Directors. Freshmen are discouraged from becoming 
■pledged to a fraternity or sorority during the first semester rushing 
season if their mid-semester grades are below average. 

Freshmen pledges will be permitted to become active members of 
a fraternity or sorority in May of the freshman year provided their 
scholastic standing is satisfactory. 

A student who has completed one full year's work in another 
college and is of sophomore standing may join a fraternity or sorori- 
ty at the close of the first semester at Susquehanna University, pro- 
vided the student's conduct has been satisfactory and class standing 
has been maintained. 

DISCIPLINE 

It is assumed that all students have come to college voluntarily 
for serious study and that they will cheerfully adjust themselves to 
its ideals and regulations. The college reserves the right to require 
the withdrawal of students whose scholarship is unsatisfactory, and 






STUDENT INTEREST 23 

of those who for any other reason are regarded as not in accord with 
the ideals and standards which the college seeks to maintain. 

A student suspended for misdemeanor loses all credit for work 
done during the semester.'' In any case of reinstatement, the student 
will be on probation for one semester. 

Intoxicating liquors shall not be allowed in students' rooms or 
fraternity houses. The detection of alcoholic liquors in any student's 
room, on his person or on his breath, will be held sufficient evidence 
to warrant his suspension from college. 

Drinking of intoxicating liquors, gambling, cheating, or similar 
breaches of discipline may be punished by suspension or dismissal 
from college. 

PRIZES 

1. The Stine Mathematical Prize — Through an endowment made 
by the Rev. H. M. Stine, Ph.D., D.D., of Harrisburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, there is annually provided a prize of fifteen dollars to be 
awarded to a member of the sophomore class who has the highest 
average in the study of mathematics during the freshman and 
sophomore years. The conditions under which the prizes will 
be conferred shall be subject to the regulations of the faculty. 

2. Sigma Alpha Iota ^National Fraternity Prize — A certificate 
is awarded by the Sigma Alpha Iota Fraternity to its senior girl 
having the highest average for four years in the music course. 

3. Omega Delta Sigma Sorority Prize — A cash prize is awarded 
by the Omega Delta Sigma Sorority to its senior girl having the 
highest academic average for her college career. 

4. Kappa Delta Phi Sorority Prize — A cash prize is awarded 
by the Kappa Delta Phi Sorority to its senior girl having the 
highest academic average for her college career. 

5. The Charles E. Covert Memorial Prize — By a bequest of 
$500.00 from the Alberta S. Covert estate, the Charles E. Covert 
memorial prize has been established to be awarded to a member 
of the junior class deemed to have exercised the most wholesome 
influence during his first three years. Elements of character, 
scholarship, attitude, and leadership will receive major consid- 
eration in awarding this prize. 

6. The Business Society Scholarship Trophy — A silver trophy 
cup, purchased by members of the class of 1950, is to be awarded 
for one year to that member of the Freshman Class in the Busi- 
ness Education or Business Administration Department who has 
attained the highest scholastic standing during his freshman year. 



24 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

1. The One-Half Scholarship, endowed by Mr. DeWitt Bodine, 
of Hughesvilje, Pennsylvania, in the amount of $500. The 
annual interest of this sum as a scholarship is under the direc- 
tion of the Council of the Lutheran Church at Hughesville, 
Pennsylvania. 

2. The Brownmiller Scholarship, of $1,000, established by Rever- 
end E. S. Brownmiller, D.D., and his son, Reverend M. Luther 
Brownmiller, A.B., of Reading, Pennsylvania. The annual 
interest of this sum is under the direction of the donors. 

3. The Bateman One-Half Scholarship, of $500, established by 
Reverend S. E. Bateman, M.D., ScD., of Atlantic City, New 
Jersey, for the benefit of the Susquehanna Synod. 

4. The Hutett Scholarship, established by Mr. E. M. Huyett, 
of Centre Hall, Pennsylvania, of $1000, to be given under the 
direction of the president of the university. 

5. The Bodine Scholarship, of $1000, established by Mrs. Emma 
B. Bodine, of Hughesville, Pennsylvania, widow of Mr. DeWitt 
Bodine, in memory of her husband, who was a director of the 
university. 

6. The Duck Scholarship, in the amount of $1000, established by 
Mr. Henry Duck, of Millheim, Pennsylvania, in memory of his 
wife. 

7. The Reiser Scholarship, in the amount of $1000, established 
by Mr. John A. Keiser, of West Milton, Pennsylvania, in mem- 
ory of his wife. 

8. The Wieand Scholarship, in the amount of $1000, established 
by Reverend W. R. Wieand, D.D., of Altoona, Pennsylvania, in 
grateful remembrance of what Missionary Institute, now Sus- 
quehanna University, did for him in earlier years. 

9. The Mary L. Steele Scholarship, in the amount of $5000, 
established by the Honorable Charles Steele, of Northumberland, 
Pennsylvania. The income is to be used for the education of 
worthy students at Susquehanna University subject to nomina- 
tion by the donor's family. 

10. The Lena Brockmeyer Scholarship, in the amount of $1000, 
established by check received from Reverend G. L. Rankin, then 
treasurer of Pittsburgh Synod, Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania. 



STUDENT INTEREST 25 

11. The M. P. Moller Scholarship, in the amount of $5000, estab- 
lished by Mr. M. P. Moller, of Hagerstown, Maryland. 

12. Class Gift Scholarship — Class gifts from the graduating 
classes of 1914, 1930, 1931, and 1932 have made possible the 
establishment of a fund, the income from which makes available 
a scholarship annually for a person who has attained a high 
scholastic rank. 

13. Women's Auxiliary Scholarship, in the amount of $1000, es- 
tablished by the Women's Auxiliary of Susquehanna University. 

14. The William H. Miller Scholarship, established by William 
H. Miller, of Stoystown, Pennsylvania, in the amount of $900. 
The annual interest on this sum is a scholarship under the direc- 
tion of the administration of the University for the education of 
worthy young men preparing for the gospel ministry. 

15. The Misses Amanda and Elizabeth Smith Scholarship, en- 
dowed in the amount of $1000, the income to be available for 
worthy students for the ministry. 

16. The Lillian V. Johanson Smith Scholarship, established in 
1943 by her sister, Miss A. E. Johanson, her brother, Dr. A. M. 
Johanson, and her husband, Dr. G. Morris Smith. The amount 
of the endowment is $1,720, the interest from which is to be 
awarded from year to year to that needy student who, in the 
judgment of the scholarship committee, shows the marks of 
scholarly achievement coupled with dedication to the Christian 
spirit. 

17. The Abraham H. Heilman Scholarship, in the sum of $1000, 
established in 1945 by his son, William C. Heilman, Cambridge, 
Massachusetts. 

18. The Adeline Elizabeth Landes Scholarship, in the sum of 
$1000, established in 1945 by her son, Dr. Latimer S. Landes, 
York, Pennsylvania. 

19. The Sallie Burns Lenker Scholarship, in the sum of $5000, 
established in 1945 by Mrs. Sallie Burns Lenker, Dalmatia, Penn- 
sylvania, for students of the Lower Mahanoy Consolidated School, 
Dalmatia, Pennsylvania. It is understood that recipients of this 
scholarship shall, upon achieving earning capacity, make in 
gratitude an appropriate contribution to the Sallie Burns Lenker 
Scholarship Fund. 

20. The Della Gramly Ocker Scholarship, in the sum of $1628.45, 
established by the will of Mrs. Della G. Ocker, Harrisburg, Penn- 
sylvania, for worthy students of the ministry. 



26 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

21. The Business Scholarship, endowed in 1946 by the Business 
Society of Susquehanna University in the sum of $600 to aid 
worthy business students. 

22. The Thomas David Bittinger Scholarship in the sum of $500, 
established January 29, 1947 by his father, Charles E. Bittinger, 
in memory of his son, a former student at Susquehanna Univer- 
sity, who lost his life in "World War II. 



HEALTH SERVICE 

The success of a student in college and in later life depends 
largely upon physical fitness and reserve energy, both of which are 
fundamental to an active mind and capacity for hard and efficient 
work. The student is constantly reminded of the importance of good 
health and is urged to develop habits that lead to wise use of leisure 
time, both while in college and after graduation. 

Health activities, physical education, and intercollegiate and 
intra-mural sports are integrated into a health program which is 
required of all students. The health service embraces the following 
activities: physical examination of all students; health supervision 
and inspection of dormitories, dining halls, kitchen, wash rooms, 
dressing rooms, and showers ; cooperation with the student's family 
physician; development of a scientific attitude toward the building 
of good health, including diet, physical exercises, control of the 
emotions, and mental hygiene. The student is taught to build a 
social and recreational program to develop qualities of cooperation, 
fair play, perseverance, self-control, and sportsmanship. The col- 
lege operates a dispensary under the supervision of a registered 
nurse, who is resident in Seibert Hall. Her services are available to 
all students in case of illness and for treatment of minor injuries. 
When the services of a physician are needed they may be obtained 
at a minimum cost. The health program is carried on largely in 
connection with the athletic fields, recreational facilities, and the 
gymnasium. 

The university field is made up of two gridirons, a soccer field, a 
baseball field, a nine-hole golf course, four tennis courts for men, and 
an excellent quarter-mile track with a 220-yard straightaway. On 
the opposite side of the gymnasium is the women's athletic field, 
including the hockey field, a soccer field, an archery range, and five 
tenuis courts. 

The alumni gymnasium is 110 feet long and 65 feet wide. The 
first floor contains locker rooms, shower rooms, play rooms, and 



STUDENT INTEREST 27 

separate equipment facilities for men and women. The second floor, 
comprising the gymnasium proper, is large enough to permit two 
games of basketball to be played simultaneously. There are facilities 
for indoor baseball, volleyball, tennis, handball, badminton, and gym- 
nastic activities. At the north end of the building are separate 
offices for the directors of athletics. 

Numerous social functions and exhibitions are held in the gym- 
nasium, which has a seating capacity of more than six hundred. 

OPPORTUNITIES IN MUSIC 

Because of the presence on the campus of a Conservatory of Music 
the students of Susquehanna enjoy unusual opportunities in the field 
of music. The various musical organizations of the Conservatory 
constantly produce musical programs which are above the average. 
In addition, the college, through its Star Course, presents to the 
campus annually outstanding musical artists. 

While the leadership in this field is naturally placed upon the 
faculty and students of the Conservatory, the various musical organi- 
zations are open to all the students of the college. 

HOUSING AND BOARDING FACILITIES 

All resident freshmen and sophomores are required to room in the 
college residences and board in the college dining hall. 

Any resident junior, senior or special student desiring to room in a 
fraternity house must first have written permission of the business 
manager. No students shall room or board at hotels, restaurants, or 
public boarding houses. Rooms are rented for the full college year 
and no change is permitted except through a written request to and 
approval of the business manager. 

No deduction will be made from the charges for board unless the 
student applying for the same has been unavoidably absent for a 
period of at least two weeks. The college reserves the right to close 
all residences as well as the dining room at stated times, especially 
during vacation periods. 

Rooms in the residences are furnished with beds, springs, mat- 
tresses, wardrobes, chairs and tables. Each student must come sup- 
plied with sheets, blankets, pillows, pillow cases, rugs, towels, pic- 
tures, and articles of decoration. It is suggested that each student 
bring a good electric study lamp. The choosing of room decorations 
such as curtains, especially where the student is rooming in a double 
room or suite of rooms, should not be made until the roommate is 
consulted. 

Any student wilfully destroying or defacing college property will 
he required to pay the cost of replacement or repair and will be 
subject also to a fine or dismissal from the institution. 



28 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

It is assumed that all students contracting for room and board 
in the college residences accept the responsibility of abiding by the 
rules and regulations. 

The college does not carry insurance on personal property of 
faculty members or students and is not responsible for any loss of 
property. 

Special electric appliances such as heaters, irons, high-powered 
lamps, etc., are not permitted except by arrangement with the bursar 
to cover cost of current consumed. 

Room assignments are made to returning students in April. Ap- 
plication for a room must be accompanied by a deposit of ten dollars. 
Unless the reservation is cancelled before August first, the fee is for- 
feited or applied on the bill for the first semester. The rooms are 
rented for the entire year, but the college reserves the right to change 
any room assignment if it deems it advisable. The college also 
reserves the right to inspect the rooms when it sees fit to do so. 

WORKING POSITIONS AND SCHOLARSHIP GRANTS 

Opportunities for working positions on the campus are open alike 
to men and women students. The number of positions open each 
year is variable. Opportunity for student employment is contingent 
upon the quality of the academic record maintained. Any student 
deserving such an opportunity should make application to the busi- 
ness manager before May 1. 

Scholarship grants are awarded on the basis of mental ability, 
academic achievement, general deportment, and financial need. They 
will not be renewed when the holder falls below an academic average 
of C for the school year. These grants will be reduced or withdrawn 
for unsatisfactory deportment or for an unsatisfactory academic 
record. 

BOOKSTORE 

Text books and school supplies may be purchased at the Book 
Store. Students must pay directly to the shire for all articles when 
purchased. Student mail is distributed from lock boxes at this store. 
The store is located at the south end of the first floor of Selinsgrove 
Hall. 

EXCLUSION PROM THE UNIVERSITY 

The Administration reserves the right to exclude at any time 
students whose conduct or academic Btanding it regards as undesir- 
able, and without assigning any further reason therefor; in such 
cases the fees due or which may have been paid in advance to the 
institution will not be remitted or refunded, in whole or in part, :m<l 
neither the institution nor any of its officers shall be under any 
liability whatsoever for such exclusion. 



SPECIAL EVENTS 



To broaden and enrich the life at Susquehanna, special speakers, 
artists, and groups appear from time to time. Since the last catalogue 
was published, the following have been heard: 



1946 
October 15 

October 16 
November 9 

November 12 
November 20 
December 3 
December 10 

December 12 

1947 
February 5 

February 12 
February 14 

February 17 
March 17 
March 25 
May 2 

May 25 

May 26 



October 20 
October 24 



November 5 



November 5-8 

November 17 
November 19 



Andreas Schanke, Norway, member of the staff of the 

World Student Christian Federation 
Leonard Pennario, pianist 
"Hasty Heart" a play presented by the Theatre Guild 

of Susquehanna University 
Cambridge Collegium Musicum 

"Macbeth," presented by the National Classic Theatre 
Hector Bolitho, British, historian and biographer 
Dr. C. V. Erdly, superintendent of schools, Lewistown, 

Pennsylvania 
"H. M. S. Pinafore," operatta presented by the students 

of the Conservatory of Music 



Miss Mildred Winston, Secretary of the Board of Edu- 
cation of the United Lutheran Church in America 

Dr. Paul Empie, head of Lutheran World Action 

Dr. George Buttrick, pastor of Madison Avenue Pres- 
byterian Church, New York City 

Miss Adelaide Abbot, lyric coloratura soprano 

Walter Duranty, lecturer 

William Hess, tenor 

Edward D. Madden, executive vice president of Ameri- 
can Newspaper Advertising Network, Inc. 

Dr. G. Elson Ruff, editor of "The Lutheran," baccalau- 
reate address 

The Honorable William S. Livengood, Secretary of In- 
ternal Affairs for the Commonwealth of Pennsyl- 
vania, commencement address 

Robert St. John, news commentator 

Dr. Peng Fu, president of Lutheran Missionary Activi- 
ty in China, with Dr. Paul P. Anspach, former mis- 
sionary to China, as translator 

The Reverend Oswald Elbert, Eastern Secretary of the 
Student Service Commission of the N v tional Luth- 
eran Council 

"The Queen's Husband," a play presented by The Sus- 
quehanna Players 

Frederick Jagel, Metropolitan Opera tenor 

Dr. J. Carter Swaim, professor of New Testament Lit- 
erature, Western Theological Seminary, Pittsburgh 



29 



EXPENSES 



RESIDENT STUDENTS 

The Tuition charge to resident students is $12.00 per semester hour. 
The total costs for the year, including tuition, board, room rent, and 
all other expenses except special fees, are approximately as follows, 
depending upon choice of room: 



Men PER YEAR 

Tuition ($12 per semester hour) 

Liberal Arts (32 hrs. for the year) $384.00 

Activities Fee 25.00 

Board 300.00 

Books (estimated) 35.00 

Average Room Rent for Men 90.00 

Approximate cost for year $834.00 



Women 

Tuition ($12 per semester hour) 

Liberal Arts (32 hrs. for the year) $384.00 

Activities Fee 25.00 

Board 300.00 

Books (estimated) 35.00 

Average Room Rent for Women 105.00 



\ 



Approximate cost for year $849.00 



The tuition general expenses for the Music Education Course is 
$450.00 a year. For further details see page 100. 



DAY STUDENTS 

The tuition charge to day students is $12.00 per semester hour. 
Special fees are extra. 

30 



EXPENSES 31 

SPECIAL FEES 

Alumni Association life membership, senior year, 

second semester $5.00 

Accounting, All Courses 5.00 per semester 

Botany, zoology, comparative anatomy, bacteriology 

embryology and history 4.00 per semester 

Change of registration 1.00 per semester 

Chemistry, all courses 6.00 per semester 

Commercial education 15, 16, 25, 26 5.00 per semester 

Experimental physics 6.00 per semester 

Health and dispensary service 2.50 per semester 

Surveying 3.00 per semester 

Graduation fee, senior year, second semester 8.00 

Observation and practice teaching, senior year 2.50 per credit 

Transcript of record (after first copy) 1.00 

The special fees for each semester must be paid in advance or at the 
time of registration. 



PAYMENT OF BILLS 

advance of the arrival of the student. Cheeks should be made pay- 
ableto Susquehanna University. No student is registered until his 
bill has been settled in the Bursar's office. 



TRANSCRIPTS AND GRADUATION 

Satisfactory settlement of all bills and fees is required before 
semester grades or an honorable dismissal can be granted and trans- 
cript of grades released. No student will be graduated until all final 
obligations to the college, class publications, organizations and clubs 
are settled. This includes class assessments voted by a majority of 
a class in a regularly called meeting. 



REFUNDS 

No fee will be refunded unless serious illness or other cause 
entirely beyond the control of the student compels withdrawal from 
the college. Students dismissed for unsatisfactory work or for in- 
fringement of college rules are allowed no refunds. There will be 
no refunds for courses dropped two weeks after registration day. 




1 



PERSONAL ATTENTION FOR THE 
INDIVIDUAL STUDENT 



Susquehanna has always maintained a faculty large enough to give 
personal attention to each individual student. It has, therefore, been 
possible to provide close personal attention and counselling. 

The transition from high school to college is a difficult one. Col- 
lege work is heavier and more exacting. Tt requires more time for 
study than the average high school senior has previously found 
necessary. Tn addition, college freshmen are living away from home, 
and the problems of adjusting their lives to new surroundings and 
new people are difficult and perplexing. So great are the difficulties 
of this transition stage that the number of students who fail because 
of them during the first two years of college is exceedingly high. 
For many students, the warm, friendly, personal atmosphere of the 
Susquehanna campus has meant success in solving these problems. 

Susquehanna's policy is to provide personal attention for those 
who need it. Students who are capable of directing their own col- 
lege studies and affairs successfully are not required to have faculty 
members counsel and guide them. Students learn by doing, and for 
those who do well, nothing is so retarding as unnecessary supervision. 

This does not mean that students are left to do as they please. 
Personal supervision for all naturally results from an adequate 
faculty, small classes, and a self-contained campus located on the 
outskirts of a college town of 3,000 persons. But in addition to this 
naturally favorable situation, the following specific program is the 
heart of Susquehanna's personalized education for those who need it : 

(1) All freshmen are given placement tests on entering the college, 
the results of which, together with their high school records, guide the 
administration in its immediate handling of the students. 

If their records show that they have done good work and are poten- 
tially capable of continuing to do good work, they are allowed to carry 
on their college programs with a minimum of guidance. This is supplied 
by those professors in the subject-matter fields of their choice, who 
assist them in making out their semester schedules of studies. They are 
also under the close supervision of their classroom instructors, the dean 
of women, and the dean of the college. 

32 



PERSONAL ATTENTION 33 

If their records show that they are not strong students, they are 
assigned to a faculty adviser, who talks over their records with them, 
discusses study habits, and helps make out study schedules. 

(2) If, at any marking period, students fail to make the minimum 
passing standard, they are assigned to a faculty adviser (if they do not 
already have one). 

(3) In addition to the above, the dean of women and the dean of 
the college give special attention to failing students by holding personal 
interviews with them and keeping their parents informed of the progress 
of each case. 

(4) At the end of each semester the complete records of failing 
students are reviewed by a faculty committee representing the main fields 
of study. At this review, reports from the faculty advisers are read 
and the strength and weakness of the students are evaluated. For those 
students who have possibilities of improvement, the committee prescribes 
programs of studies, regulates their extra-curricular activities, notifies 
the parents of the difficulties, and calls the attention of professors to 
these cases. 

By such specific actions does Susquehanna make failure in college a 
difficult thing and by such practical procedures does it make individu- 
alized education a realty. 



EDUCATIONAL AND VOCATIONAL 
GUIDANCE 



During the Orientation Program each new student is given a series 
of college aptitude and placement tests. An opportunity is given each 
student to confer with a member of the teaching staff to outline the 
work of the freshman year. 

The Dean maintains a central personnel file in which all the 
students' records from various sources are collected. These are used 
to aid the student in coming to an intelligent adjustment to college 
life. 

Not later than the end of the sophomore year each candidate for 
the B.A. degree is required to select some field in which he expects 
to concentrate his work. This is expressed in a major and a sup- 
porting minor. When the selection of a major has been made, the 
professor at the head of that department becomes the student's 
adviser and replaces the general adviser of the freshman and sopho- 
more years. The major adviser in consultation with the student 
completes an outline of the student's program of study for the re- 
mainder of his college course. These major advisers work in con- 
junction with the professional advisers who are acquainted with the 
specific requirements of a particular profession. 

Vocational planning is furthered by : 

1. Encouraging the student to secure accurate information about the 

vocation in which he is interested and by building up a body of 
qualifications to be successful in the occupation. 

2. Giving of vocational interest test9 to students who believe they 

possess special interests or abilities, or to those who are 
undecided. 

3. Maintaining a series of references in the library on a special shelf 

where students may get acquainted with the literature about the 
different professions. 

4. Informing students who plan to enter the professions or pursue 

further study, on such matters as schools, admissions, costs, 
scholarships, and courses. Tbe following professional advisers 
have been designated for this purpose : 

34 



GUIDANCE 35 

Profession or Occupation Advisers 

Accounting Graham 

Business Graham 

Chemistry Houtz 

Commercial Education Graham 

Dentistry Soudder 

Diplomatic or Government Service Russ 

Teaching Waterbury 

Journalism Wilson 

Law Russ 

Library Service Kolpin 

Medical Professions SeuroER 

Ministry and Religious Education President Smith 

Music LlNEBAUGH 

Nursing Hein 

Psychology W-AT«RBURY 

Physics Hoover 

Radio and Aviation Hoover 

Secretarial Allison 

Veterans' Education Galt 



THE APPOINTMENT BUREAU 

The College maintains an Appointment Bureau for the benefit of 
graduating seniors and alumni. This service is given free of charge. 
Positions are not definitely guaranteed, but a large percentage of 
students have been placed through Appointment Bureau contacts. 
In the past it has been primarily a placement agency for those 
entering the teaching profession, but recently, definite work has been 
done to widen the Bureau's scope, and to secure contacts with private 
firms, large corporations, and state and federal civil service. 



A college education is intended to enrich the student's cultural 
life and to prepare him to earn his living in a worthy profession. 
In many professions a rich cultural foundation, or general education, 
is the basis for later professional specialization. Susquehanna's 
curricula offer a wide variety of vocational choices. 

The following outlines of courses leading to vocations are sug- 
gestive. While some subjects are of necessity required for a par- 
ticular profession, the administration permits as much flexibility 
as possible after basic requirements are met. 



ACCOUNTING 

A complete program in this field is offered at Susquehanna. The 
courses are listed under Business Administration. Students who are 
interested in becoming certified public accountants in Pennsylvania, 
New York, or other states, should consult the head of the Department 
of Business Administration concerning requirements for certificates 
as Certified Public Accountants. 



BACTERIOLOGY (Laboratory Technician) 

A new profession for women has opened up in the general field 
of bacteriology, in which specialized training leads to the career of 
laboratory technician in doctors' laboratories, hospitals and public 
health service. A laboratory technician is trained to perform 1 1 1 » ■ 
various chemical, microscopic and bacteriological tests used in the 
diagnosis and treatment of disease. The course consists of two 
parts: (1) a minimum of two years in college, followed by (2) a full 
year of practical work in an accredited hospital. The length of the 
college work varies, some hospitals demanding a full four-year col- 
lege course before permitting the student to enter for the year of 
practical work. Susquehanna has successfully prepared students 
for both the minimum and maximum requirements, and the inurse 
as outlined meets the pre-professional requirements of the Registry 
of Medical Technologists. The suggested course of study is as 
follows : 

36 



PREPARATION FOR A CAREER 37 

IABORATORY TECHNICIAN 

First Second 
Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition 3 3 

Bible 2 2 

Zoology 3 3 

General Chemistry 3 3 

College Algebra 3 

Trigonometry 3 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 3 

Sociology or Psychology 3 3 

Comparative Anatomy 3 3 

Quantitative Analysis 3 3 

History 3 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

Students who desire the third and fourth years of this course 
before entering their hospital training will consult their faculty 
adviser. 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION" 

For many years Susquehanna has been offering specialized train- 
ing for those young men and women who desire to enter business as 
a vocation. There are opportunities for graduates of this course to 
become accountants, salesmen, bankers, advertising men, statisticians, 
real estate and insurance specialists, and business analysts. There 
are opportunities in government service for those with a major in 
economics or accounting. The course is well balanced with general 
education and the basic studies of the business world. 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Economic Geography 3 

Business Mathematics 3 

Elementary Accounting 3 3 

Science Survey 3 3 

Business Law 3 3 



38 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

First Second 

Freshman Year (Continued) Semester Semester 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 

Business English 3 

Bible 2 2 

General Psychology 3 

Economics 3 3 

American History or Sociology 3 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

Elective 3 6 

Junior and Senior Years 

Additional courses must be taken to complete the requirements 
for graduation as outlined on page 56. These include Ethics 2 hours, 
Christian Philosophy 2 hours, American Government 6 hours, the 
required number of electives in general education, and the required 
number of hours in Business Administration and Economics selected 
from the following courses in consultation with the head of the 
department : 

Economic Geography 3 

Economic History 3 

Business English 3 

Mathematics of Finance 3 

Business Management 3 

Personnel Management 3 

Advanced Business Law 3 

Machine Accounting 3 

Intermediate Accounting 6 

Advanced Accounting 3 

Cost Accounting 3 

Auditing 3 

Federal Tax Accounting 3 

Statistical Methods 3 

Marketing 3 

Advertising 3 

Salesmanship 3 

Consumer Economics 3 

Investments 3 

Insurance 3 

Money and Banking 3 

Labor Problems 3 

Foreign Trade 3 

History of Economic Thought 3 

Comparative Economic Systems 3 

HIGH SCHOOL TEACHING 

Susquehanna has had an outstanding record in the training of 
successful high school teachers and administrators. Her graduates 
in large numbers are serving as district superintendents, county 



PREPARATION FOR A CAREER 39 

superintendents, and principals. Training is offered in Secondary 
Education, Commercial Education, and Music Education. 

Eighteen hours in the field of education are required for cer- 
tification in Pennsylvania.* These must include Introduction to 
Teaching, 3 hours ; Educational Psychology, 3 hours ; Practice 
Teaching, 6 hours ; and 6 hours of electives in education. For Liberal 
Arts candidates Susquehanna requires that one of these electives be 
a course in the Techniques of Teaching, 3 hours. In addition the 
Department of Public Instruction requires a basic course in Ameri- 
can and Pennsylvania History. 

In Secondary Education, majors are offered in English, French, 
German, Latin, history, mathematics, chemistry, physics and biology. 
In addition to the eighteen prescribed hours of education, twenty-four 
hours are required in the first teaching field, and eighteen hours in 
each additional field, for certification. The State gives certification 
to teach the social studies, (namely, history, civics, Problems of 
Democracy, economics, and sociology) by taking 9 hours of history 
and 3 hours each of political science, economics, and sociology, total- 
ling eighteen hours. Certification is also given to teach Science 
(namely, physics, chemistry, biology, and general science) by taking 
9 hours of Physical Science, divided into 6 hours of chemistry and 
3 hours of physics (or vice versa), and 9 hours of Biological Science, 
divided into 6 hours of zoology, and 3 hours of botany (or vice versa). 

SECONDARY EDUCATION 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 3 

History of Western Europe 3 3 

Bible 2 2 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 3 

American History 3 3 

General Psychology 3 

Educational Psychology 3 

Christian Philosophy 2 

Ethics 2 

Physical Education 1 1 

The first two years for those who plan to specialize in mathe- 
matics or science will differ slightly from the above according to the 



*For New Jersey and New York requirements see pp. 73-74. 



40 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

specific major requirements found under course descriptions for each 
major field. 

The last two years in the liberal arts fields will be planned in 
conjunction with the faculty adviser in each field, in accordance with 
degree and major requirements. 

Public Speaking is a required course for all teaching candidates. 

COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 

For the specialized curriculum required by the Pennsylvania 
State Department of Public Instruction for teachers of the commer- 
cial subjects, see pages 57-58. 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

For the specialized curriculum required by the Pennsylvania 
State Department of Public Instruction for teachers of public school 
music, see pages 103-104. 

JOURNALISM 

The most adequate preparation for a career in journalism is a 
four-year liberal arts course with a major in English, and a broad 
cultural program in the social sciences, languages, and psychology. 
This should be followed by at least a year's study in a graduate school 
of journalism, although positions may be had on newspapers or 
magazines directly after leaving college. The outline for the first 
two years of the liberal arts course is found on page 55. Oppor- 
tunities are offered in college for students to obtain experience in this 
field by working on the college newspaper, The Susquehanna. 

LAW 

Entrance to an accredited law school is usually preceded by a 
four-year college course in which emphasis is placed on such funda- 
mental subjects as history, English, foreign languages, psychology, 

science and social sciences. 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 3 

History of Western Europe 3 3 

Bible 2 2 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 3 

Christian Philosophy 2 

Ethics 2 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

Science or Mathematics 3 3 



PREPARATION FOR A CAREER 41 

First Second 

Sophomore Year Semester Semester 

General Psychology 3 

Educational or Applied Psychology 3 

American History 3 3 

The junior and senior years should be planned with the faculty 
adviser to pre-legal students in accordance with the requirements of 
the law school for which the student is preparing. Electives in Busi- 
ness Administration and Economics are acceptable to some law 
schools. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 

A four-year course from an approved college is a prerequisite for 
entrance to schools of library science. Students should choose early 
the school at which they expect to do their graduate work in library 
science and plan their undergraduate work to meet its requirements. 
Such students should also apply for employment in the college library 
as student assistants. 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 3 

History of Western Europe 3 3 

Bible 2 2 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 3 

Christian Philosophy 2 

Ethics 2 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

Science or Mathematics 3 3 

General Psychology 3 

Educational or Applied Psychology 3 

American History 3 3 

The student preparing for library school should plan to major in 
English and minor in history and political science, with supplemen- 
tary courses in economics and sociology. A year of typing is includ- 
ed in this course in the junior year. 

MEDICAL SECRETARIAL 

An increasing demand for specially trained persons to act as 
secretaries for physicians, hospitals, and laboratories, has led Susque- 
hanna to incorporate such training into its Business Department. A 
suggested four year curriculum leading to the B.S. degree is as 
follows : 



42 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Science 3 3 

Shorthand 3 3 

Typing 2 2 

Bible 2 2 

Medical Terminology 1 

Home Nursing 1 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 3 

General Psychology 3 

Business Mathematics 3 

Science 3 - 3 

Sociology 21-22 3 3 

Typewriting 2 2 

Shorthand 3 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

Junior Year 

American History 3 3 

Science 3 3 

Medical Ethics 2 

Medical Office Practice 2 

Business English 3 

General Office Practice 3 

Applied Psychology 3 

Elementary Accounting 3 

Christian Philosophy 2 

Ethics 2 

Physical Education 1 1 

Senior Year 

Medical Shorthand 3 3 

Science 3 3 

Advanced Sociology 3 

Family 3 

Abnormal Psychology 3 3 

Electives 6 6 



MINISTRY 

Theological seminaries generally require a four-year college 
course for entrance. The American Association of Theological 
Schools has stated that the college work of pre-theological students 
should result in acquaintance with the world of today, in the ability 
to use certain tools of the educated man, and in a sense of achieve- 
ment. The ministry needs men of broad culture. To this end, the 
student preparing to enter the Seminary should lay emphasis on tlie 
liberal arts program in college rather than the elements commonly 
known as pre-professional. 



PREPARATION FOR A CAREER 43 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 3 

History of Western Europe 3 3 

Bible 2 2 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 3 

American History 3 3 

General Psychology 3 

Applied Psychology 3 

Christian Philosophy 2 

Ethics 2 

Physical Education 1 , 1 

In the junior and senior years, pre-tlieological students ordinarily 
choose a major from the classical languages, English, history, or 
sociology. 

Public Speaking is a required course for all pre-theological 
students. 

The following are recommended as electives : 

Introduction to Philosophy 3 

History of Philosophy . 3 

Modern Philosophers 3 

Principles of Sociology 6 

Principles of Economics 6 

Modern Social Problems 3 

The Family 3 

Abnormal Psychology 3 

Mental Hygiene 3 

Typing 4 

Introduction to Education 3 

American Literature 4 

Shakespeare 4 

American Government 3 

MUSIC 

Susquehanna has for many years emphasized the importance of 
music by maintaining a fully staffed Conservatory of Music. For 
full details of the specialized curriculum offered for the training of 
public school music teachers, see pages 103-104. 

PHYSICAL THERAPY TECHNICIAN" 

There is an increasing demand for physio-therapists. They will, 
be needed for many years after the war. 

The physical therapy technician treats disorders, such as frac- 
tures, sprains, nervous diseases, and heart trouble according to a 



44 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

patient's needs or as prescribed by a physician, rendering treatments 
encompassing all of tbe physical therapeutic arts; gives exercises to 
patients designed to correct muscle ailments and deficiencies; admin- 
isters massages and performs other body manipulations ; administers 
artificial sunray treatments, ultraviolet, or infrared ray treatments, 
therapeutic baths, and other water treatments. 

Requirements for registration as a physical therapy technician 
include 60 college semester hours, with courses in biology and chem- 
istry, and a year of physical therapy in a school approved by the 
Council of Medical Education and Hospitals of the American Medi- 
cal Association. 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Zoology 3 3 

Principles of Sociology 3 3 

General Chemistry 3 3 

Bible 2 2 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 3 

Comparative Anatomy 3 3 

Physics or Chemistry 4 4 

General Psychology 3 

Applied Psychology 3 

American History 3 3 

Physical Education 1 1 



PRE-DENTISTRY 

The American Council on Dental Education has prescribed a 
minimum of two full years of college as a requirement for entrance 
to dental schools. The requirement is difficult to accomplish in two 
years and many students take more time. The trend in dentistry, 
as in the other professions, is toward a full four-year college course 
before entering dental school. 

Pre-dental students should choose a dental college at their earliest 
possible opportunity and after securing a catalogue of that institu- 
tion, should arrange their courses at Susquehanna so that they will 
meet the specific entrance requirements of the chosen dental college. 
This should be done with the faculty adviser. The following is sug- 
gested as a tentative program for the first two years : 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Bible 2 2 

American History 3 3 



PREPARATION FOR A CAREER 45 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

General Chemistry 3 3 

Zoology 3 3 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 3 

Comparative Anatomy 3 3 

Organic Chemistry 4 4 

Introductory Physics 4 4 

General Psychology 3 

Applied Psychology 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

Students who continue in the pre-dental course will arrange their 
schedules with their faculty adviser. 

PRE-MEDICINE 

Medicine is one of the most difficult professions, and a student 
should not seek to enter the pre-medical course unless he has stood in 
the upper half of his high school graduating class. 

Pre-medical students at Susquehanna are given close personal 
supervision by an adequate group of science professors experienced 
in preparing students for the difficult study of medicine. The course 
listed below is merely suggestive since the requirements for admission 
to medical schools vary, but pre-medical students will take at least 
the following: 26 semester hours in chemistry, including 11-12, 21-22, 
31-32; 24 semester hours in biology, including 21-22, 31-32 and the 
balance from 11-12, 41-42, 43, 46; 11 semester hours in physics, and 
mathematics 13-14. 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

German or French 3 3 

American History 3 3 

General Chemistry 3 3 

College Algebra and Trigonometry 3 3 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 3 

German or French 3 3 

Bible 2 2 

General Psychology 3 

Qualitative Chemistry 3 3 

Zoology 3 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

Junior Year 

Christian Philosophy 2 

Ethics 2 

Organic Chemistry 4 4 



46 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

First Second 

Junior Year (Continued) Semester Semester 

Physics 4 4 

Comparative Anatomy 3 3 

Histology or Embryology and Physiology 3 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

Senior Year 

Social Science 3 3 

Quantitative or Physical Chemistry 3 3 

Histology or Embryology and Physiology 3 3 

Electives 6 6 

PRE-OTRSING 

The ordinary hospital will accept high school graduates as candi- 
dates for nurses' training. Those who desire to enter the larger 
hospitals will do well to take at least one year of college work before 
beginning the strenuous life of nurses' training. 

Those who desire administrative and supervisory careers in nur- 
sing should plan for a combined five years' course (two years in 
college and three years in nurses' training). Some hospitals, such as 
the Medical Center of Columbia University in New York City, pro- 
vide for the Bachelor of Science degree as well as the nurse's certifi- 
cation at the completion of such a five-year course. 

A suggested two-year pre-nursing course is as follows : 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Zoology 3 3 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Electives: Foreign Language 3: 9 9 

: Principles of Sociology 3: 

: General Chemistry 3: 

: History of Western Europe 3: 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 3 

Comparative Anatomy 3 3 

Bible 2 2 

General Psychology 3 

Applied Psychology 3 

Electives: Foreign Language 3: 6 6 

: American History 3: 

: General Chemistry* 3: 6 6 

: Principles of Sociology* 3: 

Physical Education 1 1 

PRE-VETERINARY 
Susquehanna offers the two years of college work required for 
entrance into schools of veterinary medicine. The course is as 
follows : 



•These courses should be elected if not taken in Freshman Year. 



PREPARATION FOR A CAREER 47 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Bible 2 2 

American History 3 3 

General Chemistry 3 3 

Botany 3 3 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 3 

Organic Chemistry 4 4 

Zoology 3 3 

General Psychology 3 

Elective 3 

Introductory Physics 4 4 

Physical Education 1 1 



PSYCHOLOGY 

Those who are interested in this field will find opportunities as 
clinical psychologists in child guidance clinics, school systems, hos- 
pitals, and law courts. Positions are also open as industrial psycholo- 
gists with employment offices, in government, industry, or in research. 
Graduate study is necessary for these positions after completing the 
requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in psy- 
chology. Those interested in clinical psychology should take addi- 
tional work in chemistry and biology, and those interested in indus- 
trial psychology should take supplementary work in sociology and 
economics. 



SECRETARIAL 

Four-year courses for secretaries are available. Those who take 
the four-year course prepare for executive and other secretarial posi- 
tions open in the business world to college graduates. They will 
receive the degree of Bachelor of Science. A suggested schedule for 
the first two years is as follows : 

First Second 

Freshman Year Semester Semester 

English Composition and Library Science 3 3 

Economic Geography 3 

Business Mathematics 3 

Elementary Accounting 3 3 

Shorthand 3 3 

Typing 2 2 

Personal Hygiene 1 1 

Bible 2 2 

Physical Education 1 1 



48 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

First Second 

Sophomore Year Semester Semester 

English Literature 3 

Business English 3 

General Psychology 3 

Machine Accounting 3 

Office Practice 3 

Salesmanship 3 

Business Law 3 3 

Shorthand 3 3 

Typing 2 2 

Physical Education 1 1 



SOCIAL WOEK 

Those who are planning to be social workers should take a four 
year liberal arts course with a major in sociology, and additional 
courses in psychology, economics, and similar subjects to provide a 
broad cultural background. Upon graduation from college the stu- 
dent who wishes to be a professional social worker should go to a 
specialized graduate school of social work for one or two years. 
Positions as visitors in the Pennsylvania Department of Welfare and 
Public Assistance require graduation from college. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 



ADMISSION" 

Susquehanna's policy is one of individualized attention for all 
students. In line with this policy, provision is made to accept for 
entrance any student with fifteen units from an accredited secondary 
school who shows promise of succeeding in college, regardless of the 
distribution of the high school units. In determining an applicant's 
eligibility for admission, the Committee on Admissions examines 
evidence relating to the whole personality of the applicant. This 
evidence relates to his scholarship, to his character and ideals, to the 
general character or pattern of his study in high school, to his pur- 
pose in attending college, to his health, and to other points of strength 
or weakness in his school preparation, personality, and general cul- 
tural background. 

A candidate must present evidence of good moral character as 
well as of proficiency in those studies which are prerequisites for 
the curriculum desired. A satisfactory certificate from the high 
school or preparatory school will be accepted as evidence that the 
scholastic requirements for entrance have been met. 

A student entering Susquehanna University is required to have a 
medical examination before his registration is completed. Blanks 
for this purpose will be furnished by the Secretary of Admissions 
shortly before registration. 

All new students are required to take scholastic aptitude tests. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 
A minimum of fifteen units is required if the student enters from 
a four-year, fully accredited high school or secondary school, or 
twelve units if he enters from a three-year fully accredited senior 
high school or secondary school. The units should be distributed as 
follows : 

For the Bachelor of Arts Degree 

The following pattern of subjects is recommended for entrance, 
but those students who desire to pursue this course, and lack one or 
two of these requirements, will be given a chance to correct the 
deficiency during the freshman year.* 

•Students planning to take Pre-Medical, Pre-D'ental, Pre- Veterinary or other pre- 
professional courses must satisfy the state requirements for secondary work in these 
professions. In general, these requirements follow the pattern recommended for entrance 
to course leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree. 

49 



60 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

English, 3 units ; Foreign Language, 2 units of one language ; 
Mathematics (including Algebra and Plane Geometry), 2 units; His- 
tory, 1 unit; Science, 1 unit; and electives to make fifteen units. 

For the Bachelor of Science Degree 

English, 3 units ; History, 1 unit ; Science, 1 unit, and electives to 

make fifteen units. 

For the Bachelor of Science in Music Education Degree 
Candidates for this degree must present fifteen units of secondary 

school work, and show evidence of aptitude in music. 

ADMISSION WITH ADVANCED STANDING 

Special blanks for admission with advanced standing will bo 
provided upon request. The candidate must list all institutions he 
has previously attended even though advanced standing credit is not 
desired from all of them. The following credentials are necessary : 
(1) Certificate from the high or preparatory school attended or 
equivalent, (2) Official transcript and statement of honorable dis- 
missal from each institution attended, (3) Marked catalogue from 
each institution attended showing courses completed. 

In the absence of equivalent college work, advanced standing by 
examination may be arranged in consultation with the Dean of the 
College. 

Semester credit hours will not be granted in excess of quality 
points earned. 

REGISTRATION 

At the beginning of the college year each student will be given 
instructions about enrollment in classes and the payment of bills. 

For registration after the day announced, a charge of five dollars 
will he made. No students will be permitted to register later than 
two weeks after registration day. No course may be changed one 
week after registration day. If a change of registration is made 
after the one week period, a charge of one dollar will be made. A 
course dropped without the permission of the dean and the instructor 
will be recorded as a failure. 

MARKING SYSTEM AND QUALITY POINTS 

A (90-100) Excellent 3 quality points for each credit hour 

B (80-89) Good 2 quality points for each credit hour 

C (70-79) Average 1 quality point for each credit hour 

D (60-69) Passing quality point for each credit hour-* 

F (Below 60) Failure No credit unless repeated 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 61 

A grade of WF is gii T en for any course which is dropped after any 
grading period. 

No I) grade will be counted towards a major or a minor. If a 
student fails to earn a satisfactory grade in a course in his major, 
the course must be repeated at Susquehanna if credit toward his 
major is desired. Summer school work elsewhere will not meet 
requirements for the major. 

SCHOLASTIC REGULATIONS 

A student who fails to earn at least fourteen semester hours credit 
with an equal number of quality points per semester shall be on 
scholastic probation. Two semesters of failure, resulting in scholas- 
tic probation, will cause a student to be dropped from the college. 

Work left incomplete because of illness or other unavoidable cir- 
cumstances must be completed within the next semester in attendance. 
The normal schedule of a student is sixteen or seventeen credits 
each semester, depending on his total course requirements. To carry 
more than this number, a student must have an average mark of B 
during the preceding semester, and must secure permission from the 
dean. 

The minimum load of a regular student is fourteen credits and 
the maximum is twenty credits. A special student carrying fewer 
than fourteen hours a week will pay twelve dollars per semester hour 
and special fees. 

There will be no refund for courses dropped two weeks after 
registration day. A transcript and a certificate of honorable dis- 
missal will be issued only after full payment of all fees. 
MAJOES AND MINORS 
The courses of study are known as general required courses, 
major courses, minor courses, and elective courses. 

As early as possible, and not later than the end of the sophomore 
year, each candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Arts should 
choose one major field in which he intends to concentrate, and one 
minor field. A major field is one pursued for at least twenty-four 
semester hours, and a minor is one pursued for at least eighteen 
semester hours. The program of major and minor fields shall be 
arranged by the student in consultation with the registrar of the 
college and the professor in the field chosen as a major. A major 
may be chosen from the following: 

Biology History and Political 
Chemistry Science 
Economics Latin 
English Literature* Mathematics 
French Physics 
German Psychology 
Greek Sociology 
Spanish 



V 



*A minor in English Composition is offered. For details see page 76. 



52 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

No major may be changed except by the consent of the dean and 
the department concerned. 

Majors and minors are of concern only to students in the Liberal 
Arts Course. Those in Business Administration, Commercial Edu- 
cation and Public School Music will follow the detailed programs 
outlined for these curricula elsewhere in this catalogue and disregard 
majors and minors. 

GRADUATION" REQUIREMENTS 

Susquehanna University offers a curriculum consisting of four 
years of college work leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree. This 
curriculum provides a broad, liberal culture which serves as the 
proper foundation for any of the learned professions or for speciali- 
zation in graduate study, and provides a broad basis of general 
knowledge. The Bachelor of Arts degree is conferred only after a 
student has satisfactorily completed 132 semester hours with at least 
132 quality points. 

The Bachelor of Science degree is given in Business Administra- 
tion and in Commercial Education upon the completion of 132 semes- 
ter hours with at least 132 quality points. It is also given to those 
students who complete the Soloist Course in the Conservatory of 
Music. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Music Education is awarded 
to those students who complete the 134 semester hours in the public 
school music course, with at least an equal number of quality points. 

If for any reason a student has carried more than the number of 
semester hours required for graduation, as stated above, he must 
present quality points equal to the total number of semester hours 
he has carried in college. In other words, a student cannot graduate, 
regardless of the number of semester hours he has carried, unless he 
has also maintained an average grade of C. 

Credits accepted toward graduation shall be subject to certain 
limitations. Not more than a total of 27 credits may be acquired by 
extension, correspondence, and examination, as follows : 

a. Credits by extension are limited to six. 

b. Credits by correspondence are limited to six. 

c. Credits by examination are limited to fifteen. 

Each student will be responsible for keeping his own yearly record 
of the fulfillment of his graduation requirements, so that he may 
know at all times where he stands. Although the office will keep the 
record also and advise the student concerning it, ultimate failure to 
meet any graduation requirement will be the student's responsibility. 

HONORS AT GRADUATION 

Seniors having an average of 2.75 to 3.00 quality points per 
semester hour during their college careers are graduated summa cum 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 53 

laude. Those with an average of 2.50 to 2.74 quality points per 
semester hour are graduated magna cum laude. Those with an aver- 
age of 2.25 to 2.49 quality points per semester hour are graduated 
cum laude. Honors are announced at the commencement exercises. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

Freshmen will be given sophomore ranking upon the completion 
of thirty semester hours with as many quality points. Sophomores 
will become juniors upon the completion of sixty-four semester hours, 
with sixty-four quality points. Juniors will become seniors upon 
the completion of ninety-eight semester hours with ninety-eight 
quality points. 

STATEMENT OF CEEDITS 

Upon graduation or upon withdrawal before graduation, a stu- 
dent is entitled to one certified statement of his college credits. A 
fee of one dollar is charged for each additional certificate. 

MINIMUM RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS 

To be eligible for graduation, a student must complete the mini- 
mum residence requirements : 

(1) Not less than two semesters immediately preceding gradua- 
tion and covering a minimum of 30 credits, or 

(2) Not less than 30 weeks of full-time residence in summer 
sessions covering a minimum of 30 credits. The 30 weeks and 30 
credits, constituting the last year of work in residence immediately 
preceding graduation, must be completed within a period of seven 
years beginning with the date of enrollment in the first summer 
session in question. 

REPORTS 

Reports of students doing unsatisfactory or failing work are made 
to the office at intervals during the semester. Whenever a student 
does unsatisfactory or failing work in two or more subjects, he will 
be asked to confer with the dean or adviser and a notice will be sent 
to the parent or guardian. Final reports of the work of each student 
are sent to the parent or guardian at the end of each semester. 

ATTENDANCE REGULATIONS 

Students are expected to attend all classes for which they have 
registered and all chapel services. Absences are counted from the 
first recitation in each course. Ten absences from classes during a 
semester are allowed a student. Absence from a class period twenty- 
four hours before or after a vacation or a holidav will count double. 



54 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

An unavoidable absence should be covered by an acceptable excuse 
which must be filed in the office not later than one week after the end 
of the period of absence. 

For each unexcused absence in excess of ten, one-fifth of a semes- 
ter hour of credit shall be deducted from the student's total number 
of semester hours of credit for that semester. A student who has 
incurred three times as many absences in a course as there are sem- 
ester hours of credit for that course may, at the option of the in- 
structor in consultation with the dean of the college, be dropped from 
the course. 

For every three unexcused chapel absences, one-fifth of a semes- 
ter hour shall be deducted from the student's total number of semester 
hours for that semester. 

DEAN'S HONOR LIST 

Following each semester examination period, the names of stu- 
dents who have made very high averages for that period will be 
announced by the Dean of the College. Students on the Dean's 
Honor List will be excused from the ordinary attendance regulations 
governing class recitation. They will not be excused from chapel, 
private lesson appointments, and announced recitations or tests. 

THE ACADEMIC YEAR 

As long as returning veterans need to be accommodated, the col- 
lege year will be divided into two long terms of sixteen weeks each 
and one summer term of eight weeks. For the opening and closing 
dates of these terms see the college calendar on pages 5 and 6. Non- 
veterans will be accepted in the summer term. 

REVIEW OF SOPHOMORE RECORDS 

The Committee on Student Standing will review annually the 
two-year record of each sophomore. If this review shows that the 
student has had scholastic difficulty during his first two years and 
that there is grave doubt about his ability to finish successfully the 
last two years of college, the Committee will recommend either a 
change of curriculum or withdrawal from the college. 



COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR 
DEGREES 

BACHELOK OF AETS 

Susquehanna is primarily a liberal arts college. As such, it seeks 
to give a rich cultural training to its liberal arts students. During 
the first two years of college the student should lay broad foundations 
in the general cultural courses so that in his junior and senior years 
he may work on the more specialized programs required for the 
various professions. 

The course requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree in semes- 
ter hours are as follows : English, 12 hrs. ; Foreign Language, 12 
hrs. ; Science (Science Survey, Chemistry, Physics, Biology) or 
Mathematics, 12 hrs. ; History of "Western Europe, 6 hrs. ; American 
History, 6 hrs. ; Bible and Religion, 8 hrs. ; Psychology, 6 hrs. ; Per- 
sonal Hygiene and Physical Education, 8 hrs.* These required 
courses total 70 semester hours. In addition, the student will choose 
elective courses in his major and minor fields to bring the grand 
total required for graduation up to 132 semester hours. 

A suggested program of work for the first two years of the liberal 
arts course is as follows: 

FRESHMAN TEAR 

First Semester Second Semester 

English Comp. & Library Sc. _ 3 English Composition 3 

Foreign Language 3 Foreign Language 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 Science or Mathematics 3 

History of Western Europe 3 History of Western Europe __ 3 

Bible 2 Bible 2 

Personal Hygiene 1 Personal Hygiene 1 

Physical Education _1 Physical Education _1 

16 16 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First Semester Second Semester 

English Literature 3 English Literature 3 

Christian Philosophy 2 Ethics 2 

Foreign Language 3 Foreign Language 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 Science or Mathematics 3 

General Psychology 3 Educational or Applied 

American History 3 Psychology 3 

Physical Education 1 American History . 3 

Physical Education 1 

18 18 

*Pre-medical, science, and mathematics majors omit History of Western Europe and 
take only three hours of General Psychology. 

65 



56 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

In the junior and senior years the student will complete any gen- 
eral course requirements still outstanding and specialize in the major 
and minor fields of his own choosing. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

(Business Administration) 

The Bachelor of Science degree is awarded to those who finish the 
four-year course in Business Administration. 

The general course requirements in Business Administration in 
terms of semester hours are English, 9 hrs. ; American Government, 
6 hrs.; American History or Sociology, 6 hrs.; Bible and Religion, 
8 hrs. ; General Psychology, 3 hrs. ; Science or Mathematics, 6 hrs. ; 
Personal Hygiene and Physical Education, 8 hrs. 

The required general courses total 46 semester hours. In addi- 
tion to this, 20 semester hours must be elected in the field of general 
education, and 66 semester hours are required in the field of business 
and economics. This makes a total of 132 semester hours, the num- 
ber required for graduation. 

The 66 hours which are required in Business Administration and 
Economics must include the following: Principles of Economics, 6 
hrs. ; Economic Geography, 3 hrs. ; Business Mathematics, 3 hrs. ; 
Business English, 3 hrs. ; Statistics, 3 hrs. ; Accounting, 6 hrs. ; Busi- 
ness Law, 6 hrs. ; Investments, 3 hrs. ; Business Management, 3 hrs. ; 
and 30 additional hours elected from courses in Business Administra- 
tion and Economics. 

Students planning to enter the fields of accounting, salesmanship, 
personnel guidance, federal civil service, or other specialized fields 
of business, should arrange their electives in consultation with the 
head of the department. 

The program for the first two years of the Business Administra- 
tion Course is as follows: 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fifrst Semester Second Semester 

English Comp. & Library Sc. _ 3 English Composition 3 

Economic Geography 3 Business Mathematics 3 

Elementary Accounting 3 Elementary Accounting 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 Science or Mathematics 3 

Business Law 3 Business Law 3 

Personal Hygiene 1 Personal Hygiene 1 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

17 17 




STEELE SCIENCE HALL 



COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 57 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First Semester Second Semester 

English Literature 3 Business English 3 

Bible 2 Bible 2 

American History or Sociology 3 American History or Sociology 3 

Economics 21 3 Economics 22 3 

General Psychology 3 Elective* 6 

Elective* 3 Physical Education 1 

Physical Education 1 

18 18 

In the junior and senior years, the student will complete any 
general course requirements still outstanding and will- specialize in 
Business Administration courses and allied fields. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

(Commercial Education) 

The Bachelor of Science degree is awarded to those who finish 
the four-year course in Commercial Education. This curriculum 
permits its graduates to secure a College Provisional Certificate 
licensing them to teach the commercial subjects in Pennsylvania 
high schools.** 

The general course requirements for this degree in terms of 
semester hours are English, 12 hrs. ; Bible and Religion, 8 hrs. ; 
Science or Mathematics, 6 hrs. ; General Psychology, 3 hrs. ; Ameri- 
can History, 6 hrs. ; Principles of Economics, 6 hrs. ; American Gov- 
ernment, 6 hrs.; Personal Hygiene and Physical Education, 8 hrs. 

These required courses total 55 semester hours. In addition the 
student will follow courses in Commercial Education to bring the 
grand total to 132 semester hours, required for graduation. 

The program for the Commercial Education course is as follows : 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First Semester Second Semester 

English Comp. & Library Sc. _ 3 English Composition 3 

Economic Geography 11 3 Business Mathematics 3 / 

Business Law 3 Business Law 3 

Elementary Shorthand*** 3 Intermediate Shorthand 3 

Elementary Typing*** 2 Intermediate Typing 2 

Personal Hygiene 1 Personal Hygiene 1 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

16 16 



•Intermediate Accounting is recommended as an elective. 
"Courses may be elected to help meet the requirements of other states, but because 
of the great differences between Pennsylvania requirements in Commercial Education and 
those of nearby states it is not possible to meet all of the out-of-state requirements in a 
four-year curriculum designed for Pennsylvania. 

""•Students who have completed the equivalent of these elementary courses in the 
high school will not register for typing and shorthand until the second semester, and 
will then be privileged to graduate with a minimum of 6 hrs. of typing, and 9 hrs. of 
shorthand. 



58 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



First Semester 



English Literature 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 

General Psychology 3 

Elementary Accounting 3 

Intermediate Shorthand ___ — 3 

Intermediate Typing 2 

Physical Education j — 1 



18 



Second Semester 



English Literature 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 

Economic Geography 22 3 

Elementary Accounting 3 

Advanced Shorthand 3 

Advanced Typing 2 

Physical Education 1 



18 



JUNIOR YEAR 



First Semester 



American History 3 

Principles of Economics 3 

Intermediate Accounting 3 

Introduction to Education 3 

Shorthand and Typing Methods 2 

Bible 2 

Physical Education 1 



17 



Second Semester 



American History 3 

Principles of Economics 3 

Intermediate Accounting* 3 

Educational Psychology 3 

Business English 3 

Bible 2 

Physical Education 1 



18 



SENIOR YEAR 



First Semester 



American Government 3 

Christian Philosophy 2 

Office Practice 3 

Business Curriculum 3 

Public Speaking 3 

Elective** 2 



Second Semester 



American Government 3 

Ethics 2 

Bookkeeping Teaching Methods i 2 
Practice Teaching - C 



16 



13 



BACHELOR OF £CIENCE IN MUSIC EDUCATION 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Music Education is awarded 
to those students who complete 134 semester hours in the Conservatory 
of Music in the curriculum which has been approved by the State 
Council on Education for the preparation of supervisors and teachers 
of public school music in Pennsylvania. See pages 103-104 for details. 



•Machine Accounting may be substituted. 
•*Two or three hours may be elected. Salesmanship should be elected if the student 
wishes this subject included on his Pennsylvania teaching certificate. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



The courses with odd numbers are given during the first semester, 
and those with even numbers are given during the second semester. 
Courses open primarily to freshmen are numbered eleven to nineteen 
inclusive; to sophomores, twenty-one to twenty-nine inclusive; to 
juniors, thirty-one to thirty-nine inclusive; and to seniors upward 
from forty-one. 

AET 

Mr. Meader 

32 Introduction to Art 

An introductory survey course in the forms and history of art as 
an expression of man's cultural development. Art as an ethnic 
phenomenon is studied, together with the basic principles governing 
its creative processes. Required of Public School Music students. 
Three hours. Three credits. 

33 Art Appreciation — Ancient and Medieval 

A general survey of sculpture, painting and architecture in 
Ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Asia Minor, Greece, Italy, and North- 
ern Europe. The most important factors that have influenced the 
arts (religious beliefs; social, economic, and political factors; geog- 
raphy and climate) will be studied. The purpose of this course is to 
supply an elementary equipment for critical appreciation and the 
development of artistic taste. Field trips will be made to the Art 
Galleries, National Cathedral, and public buildings in Washington, 
1). C, in this course and in Art Appreciation 34. 
Two hours. Two credits. 

34 Art Appreciation — Renaissance Through Modern Times 

A survey course designed to introduce the student to the history 
of painting, sculpture, and allied arts from the Renaissance to the 
present. The various schools of painting in Italy are studied, to- 
gether with the works of the master artists of Holland, Belgium, 
Spain, France, Germany, England, and America down to the art of 
today. This course is designed to develop fundamental principles of 
critical judgment. 
Two hours. Two credits. 

59 



60 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

BIBLE AND RELIGION" 

Mr. Ahl 
Mr. Lotz 

Distinctive features of the church college are the development of 
Christian character and the training of its students to be leaders in 
the church and community. The specific objects of this department 
are, therefore, to help the student to appreciate the place of the Bible 
in education; to give satisfying motivation for living, and power to 
face the problems of life. 

21 Old Testament 

This course acquaints the student with the records, history, cus- 
toms, laws and literature of the Hebrew people. Constant work with 
sources and collateral readings are required. 

Two hours. Two credits. 

22 New Testament 

The life and teachings of Christ are the natural center of this 
course. An intensive study is made of the Gospels and the Acts of 
the Apostles, with their religious and ethical implications, as well as 
their historical and biographical content. 

Two hours. Two credits. 

31 Christian Philosophy 

A study of the origin, purposiveness of the universe and of man 
in the light of Christian truth, together with an interpretation of 
religious phenomena. Intended to help the student to a constructive 
solution of the ultimate problems of religious belief. 

Two hours. Two credits. 



32 Christian Ethics 

A study of the beginnings and growth of morality, the theories of 
moral life, its relation to religion, and the application of these theories 
in the modern world of moral action. This course covers the moral 
responsibilities in a democratic society as they apply in individual 
and group relations, emphasizing the stabilizing effect of loyalty to 
Jesus in all relationships of life. 

Two hours. Two credits. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 61 

33 Apostolic Period 

In this study, Apostolic Christianity is presented as it is set forth 
in the Acts of the Apostles and in the Epistles of the New Testament, 
in such a manner as to give a clear view of the historic situation in 
the Roman and Jewish world of the first century in which Christi- 
anity had to gain a foothold. 

Two hours. Two credits. 

35 Social Teachings of Jesus 

In search for a solution of the modern problems of society in 
political, institutional, civic and domestic spheres, the attention of 
the student is directed to the Master-Teacher, and to His chosen 
disciples who gave expression in their writings to His principles of 
social behaviour. 

Two hours. Two credits. 

36 Comparative Religion 

The various religions are studied to discover the elements that are 
fundamental in all religious thinking and which point to a divine 
origin of religion itself. The Christian religion is presented as the 
absolute religion which satisfies the whole man in all his needs and 
which reveals these fundamentals in such a way as to be adapted to 
all races of mankind. 

Two hours. Two credits. 




62 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

BIOLOGY 

Mr. Scudder 

The major consists of courses 11-12, 21-22, 31-32 and electives to 
make 24 semester hours. 

The minor consists of courses 11-12, 21-22 and electives to make 
18 semester hours. 

11-12 Botany 

A study of structure and physiology in higher plants with a con- 
sideration of typical life histories of flowering plants, conifers, ferns, 
mosses, fungi and algae. 

Two recitations and one three-hour laboratory period throughout the 
year. Six credits. 

21-22 Zoology 

A survey of the principal groups of animals from the standpoint 
of structure, physiology, the life cycle and biological theory. 
Two recitations and one three-hour laboratory period throughout the 
year. Six credits. 

31-32 Comparative Anatomy 

Both phylogeny and ontogeny are considered in interpreting the 
adult structure of vertebrates. The dogfish, Nccfurus, and the cat 
are dissected in the laboratory. Prerequisite, Course 21-22. 

Two recitations and one three-hour laboratory period throughout the 
year. Six credits. 

33 Bacteriology 

The classification, structure and physiology of microorganisms 
and their importance in nature and in disease are discussed. Bacteri- 
ological methods are emphasized in the laboratory. Prerequisite 1 , 
Course 11-12 or 21-22. 
Two recitations and one three-hour laboratory period. Three credits. 

35 Heredity 

A study of the manner in which characteristics are transmitted 
from one generation to the next, with a discussion of the application 
of hereditary principles to the improvement of the human race. 
Prerequisite, Course 11-12 or 21-22. 
Three recitations. Three credits. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 63 

41-42 Histology 

A study of the microscopic anatomy of the tissues and organs of 
mammals with a consideration of methods of preparing animal tis- 
sues for microscopic study. Prerequisites, Courses 21-22 and 31-32, 
but may accompany 31-32. Alternates with 43 and 46. 

One recitation and six hours of laboratory. Six credits. 

43 Embryology 

The development of chordates is studied by a brief review of con- 
ditions in Ampkioxus and the frog, followed by a fuller consideration 
of young chick embryos. A textbook, whole mounts and serial sec- 
tions are used. Prerequisites, Courses 21-22 and 31-32, but may 
accompany 31-32. Alternates with 41-42. 

One recitation and six hours of laboratory. Three credits. 

46 Physiology 

A study of the manner in which the tissues and organs of the body 
perform their functions. Prerequisites, Courses 21-22 and 31-32, 
but may accompany 31-32. Alternates with 41-42. 

Three recitations. Three credits. 

48 Seminar 

An informal course primarily for majors. A variety of biological j/ 
topics will be discussed or assigned for special reports. Special in- 
terests of individual students will be considered. Given as required. 

One or two recitations. One credit. 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION* 

10 Elements of Business Mathematics 

A study of the practical aspects of mathematics with which busi- 
ness is principally concerned. The course reviews the fundamental 
operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of 
integers, fractions and decimals. It presents linear equations, per- 
centage, discounts, simple and compound interest, exponents, loga- 
rithms, and annuities. Stress is laid on short methods of computa- 
tion and on the preferred method of procedure where several are 
available. 

Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Strathmeyer 



''Also see courses listed under Commercial Education and Economics. 



64 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

11-12 Elementary Accounting 

An introductory course emphasizing basic accounting principles 
and their applications. Original entries, the technique and classi- 
fication of accounts, adjusting and closing entries, and work sheets; 
controlling accounts, departmental trading accounts, depreciation 
and reserve accounts; and related subjects. In the second semester, 
special attention is given to elementary accounting as applied to 
partnerships and corporations, and as applied to manufacturing ac- 
counting and to the construction, analysis and interpretation of 
simple financial statements. 

Three hours recitation and two hours laboratory. Six credits. 

Mr. Armstrong 



13-14 Business Law 

A study of the law as it relates to property and business, which 
considers the following : essential elements of a contract, agency, em- 
ployer and employee, negotiable instruments, suretyship, insurance, 
bailments, carriers, sales, partnerships, corporations, deeds of con- 
veyance, mortgages, landlord and tenant, wills, guardians, and rights 
in property which result from domestic relations. Some attention is 
given to torts, business crimes, and legal procedure. 

Three hours throughout the year. Three credits. Mr. Graham 



20 Machine Accounting 

A course in the basic operating techniques of office machines and 
their application to accounting procedures. Particular attention is 
given to adding, calculating, and posting machines, class exercises 
and laboratory work. 

Two hours recitation, two hours laboratory. Three credits. 

Mr. Strathmeyer 



21 Intermediate Accounting 

Advanced corporation accounting, with emphasis on procedures 
in manufacturing accounting; computation of annuities; accounting 
principles relating to cash, receivables, and inventories. Laboratory 
problems. 

Three hours recitation and two hours laboratory. Three credits. 

Mr. Strathmeyer 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 65 

22 Intermediate Accounting 

Accounting principles relating to the classification and valuation 
of tangible and intangible assets, and liabilities; accounting for in- 
vestments; funds and reserves; and comparative statements. In- 
troduction to C. P. A. problems. 

Three hours recitation and two hours laboratory. Three credits. 

Mr. Armstrong 



25 Mathematics of Finance 

The mathematical theory underlying interest, annuities, deprecia- 
tion, mortality, insurance, and investments. 

Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Robison 

26 Business English 

A course in writing correct and effective business letters, reports, 
articles, and other forms of business communications. 

Three hours. Three credits. MR. KLEINSORG 

31 Advertising 

A study of the functions, principles, and applications of adver- 
tising. It includes copy writing, layouts, and other factors in the 
preparation of advertisements; advertising media; advertising re- 
search; the economic significance of advertising; and related topics. 

Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Graham 

32 Salesmanship 

Principles and problems of salesmanship. A study is made of 
such subjects as the selling process, character and personality as 
related to salesmanship, and principles, methods, and concrete prob- 
lems of salesmanship. 

Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Graham 

34 Personnel Management 

The course includes a study of the following : the development of 
personnel management, instruments of personnel control, education 
and training of the workers and the supervisory force, employee in- 
centives, industrial democracy and social controls, and special prob- 
lems in industrial relations. 

Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Zagars 



66 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

35 Advanced Business Law 

A course in business law intended for those who plan to enter the 
field of accounting, with a general review of principles of contracts, 
sales, and agency, and an intensive study of the law in special fields, 
such as negotiable instruments, partnerships, corporations, bankrupt- 
cy, and real property. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Graham 

37 Advanced Accounting 

Accounting theory and problems in relationship to such subjects 
as estates and trust funds, receiverships, bankruptcy, corporation 
consolidations, and advanced forms of financial statements and their 
interpretation. C. P. A. problems. 

Three recitation hours, two laboratory hours. Three credits. 

Mr. Strath meyer 

38 Cost Accounting 

Accumulation and analysis of cost data and their uses; control 
of materials, labor, and manufacturing expense; standard costs, 
budgetary controls, and related problems. 

Three recitation hours, two laboratory hours. Three credits. 

Mr. Strath meyer 



40 Statistical Methods 

Methods of analyzing and presenting numerical data, with refer- 
ence to probability, averages, and measures of correlation. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Robison 



41 Business Management 

A study of scientific business management. It includes a consid- 
eration of problems of organization, the plant and its location, factory 
efficiency, labor efficiency, cost analysis, coordination of factory oper- 
ations, and related topics. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Zagars 



43 Auditing 

Duties and responsibilities of an auditor; kinds of audits; audit 
practice, procedure, and reports. Audit practice cases. 

Three recitation hours, two laboratory hours. Three credits. 

Mr. Strathmeyer 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 67 

44 Federal Tax Accounting 

A study of the Federal Income Tax Law and Regulations cover- 
ing taxable income of individuals, partnerships, estates, trusts, and 
corporations. A brief study is also made of social security taxes, 
and estate and gift taxes. Practical problems and preparation of 
returns. 

Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Strathmeyer 



CHEMISTRY 

Mr. Houtz 

11 General Chemistry Mr. Hoffman 

A study of the occurrence, preparation, properties and uses of 
nonmetallic elements and their chief compounds. The fundamentals 
of chemistry are stressed. Students who have not submitted entrance 
credits in chemistry will comprise the first section. Section two is 
designed for those who have submitted satisfactory entrance credits 
in this subject. 
Two recitation hours, two to three laboratory hours. Three credits. 

12 General Chemistry 

The chemistry of the atmosphere and nitrogen and some of their 
most important relations are considered. The occurrence, metallurgy, 
properties and uses of the metallic elements are studied; a brief 
introduction to the chemistry of the carbon compounds is included. 
Two recitation hours, two to three laboratory hours. Three credits. 

21 Qualitative Analysis 

The principles of analysis are studied by considering the reactions 
of known metals. The writing of chemical equations, using ionic 
equations is emphasized. The determination of metals in alloys and 
compounds is required. 
Two recitation hours, three laboratory hours. Three credits. 

22 Qualitative Analysis 

After a knowledge of the principles and methods of analysis of 
compound substances and mixtures has been obtained, students are 
required to determine at least twenty-five unknown mixtures of 
natural and manufactured products. 

Two recitation hours, three laboratory hours. Three credits. 



68 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

31 Organic Chemistry 

The alipathic compounds, comprising the saturated and the un- 
saturated carbon compounds, are considered. The reactions involved 
in their preparation, including the writing of chemical equations, are 
stressed. Detailed methods are used, and reactions involved in all 
laboratory work are required. Prerequisites, 11 and 12. 
Two recitation hours, four to six laboratory hours. Four credits. 

32 Organic Chemistry 

The cyclic compounds, comprising the alicyclic and aromatic com- 
pounds, are considered. Special attention is given to their prepara- 
tion, characteristics and uses. Critical reports of all laboratory work 
are required. Prerequisites, 11, 12 and 31. 
Two recitation hours, four to six laboratory hours. Four credits. 

41 Quantitative Analysis 

Standard solutions are prepared. Determinations by neutrali- 
zations in alkalimetary and acidimetry, oxidation and reduction are 
made. Typical known substances are used to acquire knowledge of 
principles of analysis. This is followed by the analysis of compounds 
including iron ores, water, limestones, and alloys. 
Two recitation hours, three laboratory hours. Three credits. 

42 Quantitative Analysis 

Principles and methods of gravimetric analysis are studied. 
Determinations of copper, barium, sulphate, calcium, silver, chlorine, 
aluminum, potassium, magnesium, phosphates, carbonates, and car- 
bon dioxide are made. Copper, silver, and alloys are determined by 
electroanalysis. 

Two recitation hours, three laboratory hours. Three credits. 

43-44 Physical Chemistry 

The object of the course is to give a theoretical reason for the 
statements underlying previous studies in chemistry. With this as a 
background, there are then given the gas laws, elementary thermo- 
dynamics, radio-activity, atomic structure, X-rays, solutions, colloids, 
heterogeneous and homogeneous reactions. A laboratory course par- 
allels the lectures and recitations. 

Two recitation hours, and three laboratory hours throughout the year. 
Six credits. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 69 

COMMEKCIAL EDUCATION* 

15-16 Typewriting 

Instruction and mastery of the keyboard. The mechanical fea- 
tures of the typewriter. Letter writing, tabulation, and the prepara- 
tion of business papers. 

Five hours first semester, four hours second semester. Four credits. 

Miss Allison 

17-18 Gregg Shorthand 

Instruction in the principles of shorthand. Emphasis on both 
reading and writing. Dictation and transcription of practiced letters. 
Five hours first semester, three hours second semester. Six credits. 

Miss Allison 

19 Medical Aid and Simple Nursing Techniques 

This course includes the Standard Red Cross First Aid and Home 
Nursing techniques. It is designed to aid the medical secretary in 
dealing with emergencies, and to provide a background of knowledge 
in sickroom procedure, mental and physical hygiene, and sanitation. 
Two hours. One credit. Miss Hein 

20 Medical Terminology 

A study of the prefixes, suffixes, abbreviations, and definitions of 
medical terms is the basis of this course. The student learns the 
vocabulary of medical, anatomical, pathological and scientific terms, 
and studies the derivation and correct spelling and pronunciation of 
these terms. 
Two hours. One credit. Miss Hein 

24 Business English 

A course in writing correct and effective business letters, reports, 
articles, and other forms of business communications. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Kleinsorg 

25-26 Typewriting 

Prerequisite : Commercial Education 16. Perfecting and making 
permanent the skill established in the first year. Speed and accur- 
acy emphasized. Practice in the writing of manuscripts, legal 
papers, stenciling, business letters, and papers. 
Four hours throughout the year. Four credits. Miss ALLISON 



•Also see courses in Business Administration and Economics. 



70 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

27-28 Gregg Shorthand 

Prerequisite: Commercial Education 16 and 18. Advanced work 
in shorthand. Dictation and transcription of business letters, techni- 
cal matter, and radio addresses. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. Miss Allison 

29-30 Medical Shorthand 

Prerequisite: Commercial Education 26 and 28. A study of 
technical medical terminology; prefixes and suffixes, phrases, and 
special outlines. Dictation and transcription of technical material. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. Miss Allison 



33 Medical Ethics and Office Procedure 

This course is given for medical secretarial students. The aim is 
to provide an understanding of office and hospital ethics, the relation 
of the doctor and the patient, the various specialties in the field of 
medicine, and the business side of a doctor's office dealing with such 
aspects as records, fees, accounts, the doctor and the law, and liability 
and insurance. 
Two hours. Two credits. MISS Hein 

37 Shorthand and Typewriting Methods 

Prerequisite: Commercial Education 26 and 28. A critical 
study of objectives, psychological laws underlying skills, organiza- 
tion of materials, tests, and standards of achievement. Special 
attention is given to the different methods of teaching shorthand and 
typewriting. The student is given practice in drawing up lesson 
plans and teaching. 
Two hours. Two credits. Miss Allison 

39 Office Practice 

Prerequisite: Commercial Education 26 and 28. A genera] over- 
view of the function of the office in modern business. A systematic 
coverage of office routines. The uses and operating principles of 
various office machines. 
Three hours. Three credits. Miss Allison 

41 Medical Office Praci u i 

The practical aspect of the demands on a medical secretary, the 
use of office equipment, sterilization, care and preparation of instru- 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 71 

ments. The student learns the use of the clinical thermometer, 
sphygmomanometer; and other simple techniques, such as chemical 
urine analysis, and preparation for examination and minor opera- 
tions. This course includes some practical experience in this work. 
Two hours. Two credits. Miss Hein 

42 Bookkeeping Teaching Methods 

Objectives and methods in the teaching of bookkeeping and re- 
lated subjects in the high school. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Graham 

43 The Commercial Curriculum 

A comprehensive treatment of the commercial curriculum of the 
secondary school. Such topics as the origin and development of the 
commercial curriculum, constructive criticisms of existing curricula, 
cardinal principles of commercial education, the curriculum and 
local conditions, construction of curricula, and the curricula of today 
will be studied. Lectures, reference assignments, and reports. 
Three hours. Three credits. Miss Allison 

45-46 Practice Teaching (See Education) 



ECONOMICS 

Courses 21, 22, 34, 36, 41, Business Administration 39, and six 
hours selected from other approved Economics courses are required 
for a major. Courses 21, 22, 34, 36, and six hours selected from 
approved Economics courses are required for a minor. 

11 Economic Geography 

A study of the regional distribution of the world's industries, 
resources, and population with emphasis on points of special value 
to students of Business Administration. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Armstrong 

21-22 Principles of Economics* 

A study of the existing economic order and basic economic prin- 
ciples and problems. With reference to goods and services, it deals 
with production, value and price, exchange, distribution, consumption 
and saving, and income and expenditures of government. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. Mr. Zagars 



*This course is a prerequisite for all Junior and Senior courses in Economics. 



72 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

24 Economic Geography of North America 

Industries and resources of North America, their regional dis- 
tribution, their effect upon the standards of living in the United 
States, and their importance to the rest of the world. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Armstrong 

25 Labor Problems 

This is a study of labor problems from the viewpoint of the 
laborer, the employer, and the public. Recent laws will be considered 
relating to social insurance, pensions, wages, and child and woman 
labor. Special consideration will be given to labor organizations 
and their activities. 
Three hours, Three credits. Mr. Zagars 

27 Insurance 

This course deals with the economic and social values, the impor- 
tant principles and practices, and the principal legal phases, of each 
of the common forms of insurance. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Armstrong 

34 Money and Banking 

A study of the nature, functions, principles, and problems of 
money, credit, and banking. Special attention will be given to price 
levels, industrial depressions, international exchange, and government 
regulation of money and banking. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Zagars 

36 Investments 

A study of stocks, bonds, real estate, mortgages, and annuities. 
As related to investments, it includes a consideration of objectives, 
institutions, sources of information, media, analysis of risks and 
returns, and other subjects. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Graham 

37 Marketing 

A study of the principles and practices involved in moving cjoods 
from the various producer s to the consumers. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Armstrong 

41 Economic Histoey of the 1'mted States 

A study of the history of manufacturing, agriculture, transporta- 
tion, communication, banking, internal and foreign commerce and 
related topics, within the United States. (Same as History H.) 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Russ 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 73 

43 Consumer Economics 

A study of economic principles from the point of view of the 
consumer. The main objective is to point the way toward wiser 
practices for the consumer. The course includes such topics as stand- 
ards of living, intelligent buying, savings and investments, and laws 
in behalf of the consumer. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Graham 

46 Foreign Trade 

A study of the theoretical and practical problems involved in the 
sale of goods across national and economic boundaries. A survey 
will be made of world trade resources, markets and exchange prob- 
lems. (Prerequisite: Money and Banking). 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Zagars 

47 History of Economic Thought 

Development of economic concepts and schools of economic 
thought from earliest times. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Zagars 

48 Comparative Economic Systems 

A comparative study of present economic, political, and social 
doctrines of the free enterprise system, socialism, communism, and 
fascism, with particular attention to the Soviet Union and the 
United States. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Zagars 



EDUCATION 

The requirements for certification to teach in the high schools are 
as follows : 

Pennsylvania : I. Completion of an approved four-year college course. 
II. Eighteen semester hours in approved professional education distri- 
buted as follows: Introduction to Education (3), Educational Psycholo- 
gy (3), Practice Teaching (6), and 6 hours elective from History of 
Education, Techniques of High School Teaching, Secondary Education, 
Special Methods, and Visual Education. General Psychology is a pre- 
requisite to Educational Psychology. The Special Methods course must 
be in the field of either the major or minor. III. The academic subjects 
require a major of twenty-four semester hours and a minor of eighteen 
semester hours. For the special requirements in Commercial Education 
and Public School Music see pages 57 and 103 respectively. 

New Jersey: I. Basic for all certificates are (a) for academic sub- 
jects, English, 12 semester hours; social sciences, 12; science, 6; (b) 
for commercial education or music, a total of 30 credits in English, social 
studies, and science. II. Approved professional education distributed as 






# 



74 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

follows: health education, 3 semester hours; educational psychology, 3; 
aims and organization of secondary education (principles), 3; principles 
and techniques (general methods), 3; curricula and courses of study 
(special methods), 3; elective, 3; practice teaching and observation, 150 
clock hours. III. Special courses and experience required in the techni- 
cal fields; in academic subjects, 30 credits in the major field, 18 hours in 
a minor, or 12 in each of two or more minors. 

New York: I. Completion of an approved four-year curriculum lead- 
ing to the baccalaureate degree. Thirty credits of advanced work be- 
yond the baccalaureate required for the license to teach academic sub- 
jects. This additional work is not required for a license to teach tech- 
nical subjects. II. Professional requirements are elastic, as follows: 
general and special methods, 4 to 8 semester hours; educational psychol- 
ogy, 2 to 6 hours; history, principles, problems, philosophy of education, 
2 to 6 hours ; practice teaching academic subjects, 2 to 6 hours. A mini- 
mum total of 18 semester hours is required. III. A minimum of 18 
semester hours is required in each special academic field to be taught. 
Thirty-six semester hours are required in each of the technical fields. 

Those who are planning to teach must declare their intention at the 
end of the sophomore year and meet the qualifications of the Committee 
on Teacher Education. 

The curriculum is set up to meet the requirements for teaching in the 
State of Pennsylvania. Basically these are also acceptable in other 
states, especially for those preparing to teach the academic subjects in 
high schools. However, in Commercial Education and Public School 
Music such highly specialized requirements prevail in some other states 
that it has been found impossible to meet all of these requirements in a 
four-year curriculum designed primarily for Pennsylvania. 



23 Introduction to Education 

An orientation course for all who have signified their intentions 
to become teachers. The evolution of our educational system, teach- 
ing problems, the learning process, the curriculum, changing concep- 
tions of education. School visitation, with written report of observa- 
tions, required of each student. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Galt 

24 Educational Psychology 

A study of the laws, characteristics, and economy of the learning 
process with applications to school subjects. General psychology is 
a prerequisite. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Waterbury 



31 History and Principles of Education 

A study of the historical developments of education from the early 
beginnings to the present day. Special emphasis on the origin and 
development of American educational institutions. A study of pres- 
ent day tendencies and practices. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Waterbury 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 75 

32 Techniques of High School Teaching 

The principles underlying the selection and organization of sub- 
ject matter, and the development of skills, habits, ideals and attitudes 
in connection with the various school subjects. Principles that should 
guide the teacher in controlling conduct and building character. 
Each student will be required to teach a demonstration lesson in the 
presence of the instructor and the members of the class. 

Three hours. Three credits. Required of all liberal arts juniors enter- 
ing teaching. Mr. Galt 

33 Secondary Education 

Evolution of secondary schools, teaching staff, curricula, student 
organization, life guidance, aims and values of various high school 
subjects, the relation of secondary education to elementary and high- 
er education. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. WATERBURY 

44 Visual Education 

Study of audio-visual and other sensory aids in education. Lab- 
oratory work in the use of objects, specimens, graphs, charts, maps, 
pictures, the stereograph, the opaque projector, the film slide, and 
silent and sound motion picture projectors. Offered only in summer 
term. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Galt 

45-46 Practice Teaching 

Observation and practice teaching in the public high schools. 
Observation, conferences, reports, lesson plans, and teaching. A 
laboratory fee is charged. 

Six credits. MRS. GlAUQUE 

Mr. Waterbury 

47-48 Methods in Specific Subjects 

Courses in teaching methods are offered by the various depart- 
ments as required by the curricula of the students. In the Liberal 
Arts course these are elective, but in the Commercial Education and 
Public School Music courses they are required. 

50 Philosophy and Techniques of Personnel "Work 

A course designed to outline the broad scope of personnel work 
with emphasis given to the functions of the counselor, techniques 
employed, and other aspects of the work for the purpose of orienting 
the counselor to the many ramifications of personnel work. Special 
emphasis will be given to the work of the counselor and teacher- 
counselor as related to student personnel work in the secondary school. 
Three hours. Three credits. Miss Beatty 



76 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

ENGLISH 

Courses 1, 2 (or 11, 12) and 21, 22 fulfill the necessary twelve 
hours required of all candidates for the degree of bachelor of arts. 

Major, Literature: Courses 21, 22, 31, 32, 41, 42, and additional 
hours chosen from 33, 34, 35, 36 43, and 44 to make a total of 
twenty-four hours are required for a major in English literature. 

Minor, Literature: Courses 21, 22, 31, 32, 41, 42, and additional 
courses chosen from 33, 34, 35, 36, 43, and 44 to make a total of 
eighteen hours are required for a minor in English literature. 

Minor, Composition: Courses 11, 12, 28, 38, 46, and two con- 
secutive years of 23-24 are required for a minor in English Com- 
position. 

Minor, Dramatics: Courses 28, 33, 34, 41, 42, 47, 48, 49, and 50 
are required for a minor in Dramatics. 

Major English Literature; Minor, Dramatics: In order to obtain 
a major in English Literature, with a minor in Dramatics, a student 
is required to take the following courses for the major: 21, 22, 31, 
32, 35, 36, 43, 44, 45, and 46, or a total of twenty-two hours. In addi- 
tion, the student must arrange with the chairman of the English 
department for two additional credits to make the required total of 
twenty-four hours. The minor in Dramatics will follow the program 
prescribed above. 

1-2 Fundamentals of English Grammar 

Freshmen whose basic knowledge of English is deficient, as shown 
by the testing program at matriculation, will be assigned to this 
course in the fundamentals of grammar. If the student makes suf- 
ficient progress in the first semester, he will be transferred to English 
12 for the second semester. May not be counted toward a major or a 
minor. 

Three recitation hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

Mr. Kleinsorg 

11-12 Composition 

A year course in the three forms of discourse : narration, descrip- 
tion, and exposition. The instruction aims to aid the student to 
express himself clearly and grammatically, and to correct any habit 
of slipshod, inaccurate thinking. 

Library Science is also a required part of Composition 1-2 or 
11-12 and is designed to acquaint the student with the basic library 
iools, through independent research. It consists of one hour a week 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 77 

for ten weeks during one semester, and for that semester it will count 
as one-fourth of the final grade in Composition or Fundamentals. 
Three recitation hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

Mr. Kleinsorg, Miss Kolpin, Miss Stamm, and Mr. Wilson 

21 Survey of English Literature and Language 

From the beginning to 1800. An historical study of the develop- 
ment of English literature in its various forms and movements, com- 
bined with a study of the English language, its origin, structure, 
relation to other languages, development, borrowings, and general 
history. 
Three hours. Three credits. 

Mr. Kleinsorg, Mr. Meader, Miss Stamm, Mr. Wilson 

22 Survey of English Literature and Language 

From 1800 to the present day. In manner and method, a con- 
tinuation of English 21. 
Three hours. Three ci'edits. 

Mr. Kleinsorg, Mr. Meader, Miss Stamm, Mr. Wilson 

23-24 Journalism 

An introduction to the business of conducting a newspaper, with 
specific practice in reporting, editorial writing, feature article writing, 
make-up, and other activities connected with the weekly appearance 
of the college newspaper, The Susquehanna. Open to freshmen, but 
credit given only in the three upper classes. 
One recitation hour throughout the year. Two credits. Mr. Wilson 

26 Business English 

A course in writing correct and effective business letters, reports, 
articles, and other forms of business communications. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Kleinsorg 

28 Public Speaking 

Emphasis on the practice of speaking in public, together with the 
content and composition of a speech. (See Speech.) 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Gilbert 

31 American Literature 

From the beginning to Henry James. An historical study of the 
various forms and movements of our native writing. Alternates with 
41. Given 1949-50. 
Two hours. Two credits. MR. WILSON 



78 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

32 American Literature 

From Henry James to the present day. A continuation of Eng- 
lish 31. Alternates with 42. Given 1949-50. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Wilson 



33 English Drama 

An historical survey of dramatic literature in England, not in- 
cluding the works of Shakespeare, with attention to European and 
American drama. Alternates with 35. Given 1949-50. 
Two hours. Two credits. Miss Stamm 

34 English Drama 

British, Continental, and American drama from Ihsen to the 
present day. Alternates with 36. Given 1949-50. 
Two hours. Two credits. Miss Stamm 

35 English Novel 

An historical development of the novel from its beginnings to 
the close of the nineteenth century, with particular emphasis on its 
development in England. Alternates with 33. Given 1948-49. 
Two hours. Two credits. Miss Stamm 

36 English Novel 

A study of a group of novels representative of phases of develop- 
ment in the contemporary British novel from Henry James to 
Virginia Woolf. Alternates with 34. Given 1948-49. 
Two hours. Two credits. Miss Stamm 

41 Shakespeare 

Plays before 1600. Particular study of the comedies and his- 
tories, with a careful consideration of Shakespeare's workmanship. 
Alternates with 31. Given 1948-49. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Wilson 

42 Shakespeare 

Plays after 1600. Particular study of the tragedies, through 
Shakespeare's manner and method of composition. Alternates with 
32. Given 1948-49. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Wilson 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 79 

43 English Poetry 

From 1500 to 1798. An historical survey of poetry in England 
from the early Renaissance to the Romantic Movement. Given 
1948-49. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Wilson 

44 English Poetry 

From 1798 to the present day. A continuation of 43. Given 
1948-49. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Wilson 

45 Methods 

A study concerned with the problems of teaching literature and 
composition in junior and senior high school. Required in New 
York and New Jersey for the certification of English teachers. 
Alternates with 43. Given 1949-50. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Wilson 

46 Advanced Composition 

The theory and practice of various forms of literary composition : 
feature articles, verse, drama, fiction, et altera. The course requires 
the student to compose original material of considerable length, in 
weekly assignments. Alternates with 44. Given 1949-50. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Wilson 

47-48 Acting and Directing 

Emphasis will be placed upon techniques to prepare prospective 
secondary-school teachers for the responsibility of directing plays and 
operettas. Alternates with 49-50. Given 1949-50. 
Two hours throughout the year. Four credits. Mr. KLEINSORG 

49-50 Stagecraft and Lighting 

Emphasis will be placed upon the decor of scenery, setting, light- 
ing, and the general physical composition of the stage itself. Alter- 
nates with 47-48. Given 1948-49. 
Two hours throughout the year. Four credits. Mr. Kleinsorg 



FRENCH 

Courses 45 and 46 and electives in advance of 11-12 to make a 
total of 24 hours are required for a major. 

Courses totaling 18 hours in advance of 11-12 are required for 
a minor. Students planning to teach should include courses 45 and 
46 in the 18 hours. 



80 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Students choosing a French major are urged to elect a minor in 
another foreign language. It is also recommended that they elect 
related courses in history, art, philosophy, and other languages and 
literature. 



11-12 Elementary French 

A course in pronunciation, in the elements of grammar with oral 
and written exercises to illustrate their application, and in reading, 
writing, and speaking simple French. For students who have had 
one year of French or no French in high school. May not be counted 
toward a major. 
Four hours throughout the year. Six credits. Miss Stamm 

21-22 Intermediate French 

A careful review of grammar. Practice in speaking and writing 
French. Special emphasis on the reading of the short story and the 
drama. Prerequisite, French 11-12 or two years of high school 
French. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. Miss Kline 

31-32 French Literature of the 17th Century 

A study of the origin and development of French classicism with 
particular attention to comedy and tragedy. Lectures in French, 
collateral reading and discussion. Prerequisite: French 21-22. 
Alternates with French 43-44. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. Miss Kline 

41-42 French Literature of the 19th Century 

A study of Romanticism and Realism with special emphasis on 
the works of Lamartine, DeVigny, DeMusset, Hugo, Sand, Balzac, 
Flaubert, Zola, L>audet, Loti and Anatolc France. Lectures in 
French, collateral reading and discussion. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. Miss Kline 

43-44 Survey of French Literature 

A study and comparison of the main currents of French literature 
from its inception to the present day. This course is designed chiefly 
for seniors majoring in French who wish to organize and synthesize 
their knowledge of French literature as a whole. Alternates with 
French 31-32. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. Miss Kline 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 81 

45-46 Advanced Composition and Conversation 

A course to enable the student to write and speak French as fluent- 
ly as possible. Includes a study of phonetic symbols, practice in 
pronunciation and drill in the use of common idioms. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. MISS KLINE 



GENERAL SCIENCE 

11-12 Science Survey Mr. Hoffman 

The first semester's work includes a survey of the biological 
sciences as aids in man's cultural development. The second semes- 
ter's work includes a survey of the physical sciences with applications 
to modern life. 

Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 



GERMAN 

, Mr. Gilbert 

Courses 21, 22, 41, 42 and electives in advance of 11-12 to com- 
plete a total of 24 hours are required for a major. 

Courses 21, 22, 41, 42 and electives in advance of 11-12 to make 
a total of 18 hours are required for a minor. 

11-12 Beginning German 

A course in the minimum essentials of grammar to make possible 
a good reading knowledge of the language, including practice in 
simple conversation. Reading of simple stories with attention to 
their folklore, history, and characteristic atmosphere. May not be 
counted toward a major or minor. 
Three or four hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

21-22 Intermediate German 

Modern Nbvellen, poetry, and other works of medium difficulty 
will be read. Every effort will be made to increase the student's 
active vocabulary by means of composition and conversation. The 
reading of works outside the classroom aids in increasing the under- 
standing of printed German. 

Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 



82 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

31-32 German Drama of the 19th Century 

Emphasis will be placed upon romanticism, realism, and natural- 
ism, the characteristic literary attitudes of the period. The drama 
will be interpreted also as the outgrowth of the personality of such 
writers as Kleist, Grillparzer, Hebbel, Wagner and Hauptmann. 
Alternates with 33-34. Not given 1948-49. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

33-34 The German JNTovelle of the 19th Century 

The development of this form will be traced by the reading of 
important ISTovellen of each literary trend of the 19th century. 
Alternates with 31-32. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

41-42 German Composition and Conversation 

A course to give the student an excellent working knowledge of 
German grammar, and to increase his ability to use the spoken and 
the written word. The work will be based largely on texts dealing 
with German life, history and art. 
Two hours throughout the year. Four credits. 

43-44 German Literature of the 18th Century 

Representative works of the period will be read to reveal the per- 
sonality of such writers as Lessing, Goethe and Schiller, and to show 
the development of sentimentalism, storm and stress, classicism and 
romanticism. Alternates with 45-46. 
Two hours throughout the year. Four credits. 

45-46 History of the German Language and Literature 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the develop- 
ment of the German language and literature. Middle High German 
will be studied and read to make the student conscious of linguistic 
changes. Through contact with works not read previously, the 
student gains a more comprehensive knowledge of German literature. 
Recommended only for majors. Alternates with 43-44. Xot given 
1948-49. 
Two hours throughout the year. Four credits. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 83 

GREEK Mr. Ahl 

Courses 11, 12, 21, 22, and any two from 31-32, 33, 34, 35-36, 
43-44, are required for a major. Courses 11, 12 21, 22, and elec- 
tives in advance of 21, 22 to make a total of 18 hours are required 
for a minor. 

11-12 Elementry Greek 

Emphasis will he laid on the acquisition of a knowledge of the 
fundamental principles of Greek grammar and syntax. Easy selec- 
tions from Greek literature, illustrating the grammar and syntax 
studied, will be read. 
Four hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

21 Epic Poetry 

Selections from Homer's Iliad with special attention to develop- 
ing facility in reading and in the mastery of syntax. The Greek epos 
is considered as an expression of the thought and general conditions 
of early Greek life. 
Three hours. Three credits. 

22 Prose Literature 

A study of Plato's Apology and Crito or similar writings. Special 
consideration is given to the study of the character of Greek thought 
and the men who taught Greek youth the meaning of "reasoned 
truth." 
Three hours. Three credits. 

31-32 Greek Drama 

Aristophanes, the Clouds; Sophocles, Oedipus Tyrannus and An- 
tigone; Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound; Euripides, Alcestis. As many 
as possible of these selections will be studied with special attention to 
metre and scenic antiquities. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

33 Greek Literature in English 

A survey of Greek literature with an intensive study in English 
translation of literary masterpieces. Text book, recitations, lectures, 
assigned library work, selected from the ancient writers and other 
relevant books. Of interest especially to students of English, the 
classics and history. 
Two hours. Two credits. 



84 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

34 Greek Life and Thought 

A survey of the religious and social life of the ancient Greeks. 
Mythology, its influence on English literature, and on art in general, 
the social life as expressed in the national games, customs, education 
public life of the citizen, including law and government will be 
studied. Special emphasis will be placed on Greek contributions to 
modern civilization. No knowledge of the Greek language is required 
for this course. 
Two hours. Two credits. 

35-36 New Testament Greek 

A rapid reading course, designed primarily for candidates for 
the ministry and religious workers; a linguistic and historical inter- 
pretation of the New Testament. Selections from the historical and 
didactic literature. Prerequisite, Greek 21, 22, or equivalent. Alter- 
nates with 31 and 32. 

Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

43-44 New Testament Greek 

A continuation of courses 35-36 with different selections. Alter- 
nates with 35-36. 

Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 



HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

A major (24 hrs.) or a minor (18 hrs.) may be constructed out of 
courses 11-12, 21-22, 31-32, 33-34, 41-42, 43-44. 

11-12 History of Western Europe 

A survey of the history of Western Europe and the expansion of 
European civilization around the globe. The period covered is from 
the fall of the West Roman Empire to the present. 

Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. MR. Russ 

21-22 History of the United States and of Pennsylvania 

A narrative history which begins with the discovery of America 
and carries the story to the present. This course fulfills the require- 
ment as laid down by the Pennsylvania State Council of Education. 
It must be taken by all prospective teachers. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. Mr. Stevens 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 85 

23 History of Civilization 

A brief basic survey of the whole field of history. Special 
emphasis is placed on man's cultural achievements in the political, 
social, religious, intellectual, artistic and economic fields. Human 
ideals and institutions are studied in their general outline, and an 
attempt is made to trace the continuity of culture through the cen- 
turies. Required of Public School Music students. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Meader 

31-32 American Government 

A study of federal government during the first semester; state 
and local during the second. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. Mr. Russ 

33-34 Ancient History 

A brief survey of the ancient world, covering the history of the 
monarchies of the Near East, the rise of democracy in Greece, and 
the story of Rome down to the barbarian invasions. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. Mr. Ahl 

41 Economic History of the United States 

A study of the history of manufacturing, agriculture, transporta- 
tion, communication, banking, internal and foreign commerce and 
related topics, within the United States. Prerequisites: 21-22, 31-32. 
(Same as Economics 32). 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Russ 

42 World Problems 

An analysis of the problems facing the nations in the search for 
international peace. Prerequisites : 21-22, 31-32. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Russ 

43 Seminar 

A course in historiography and the methods of research. The 
purpose is to teach the student, who intends to go to graduate school, 
the mechanics of historical writing. Prerequisites : 21-22 ; 31-32. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Russ 

44 Methods in Teaching the Social Studies 

This course is offered when needed by those out-of-state majors 
who intend to teach the social studies. Given 1948-49. Prere- 
quisites: 21-22, 31-32. 
Three hours. Three credits- Mr. Russ 



86 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

LATLN 

Mr. Meader 

Courses 13-14, 21-22, 31-32, 36 and one course selected from 33, 

34, 35 are required for a major. Courses 13, 14, 21, 22, 31, 32 are 

required for a minor. Students planning to do graduate work should 

also have a reading knowledge of German. 

The composition course is required for those who plan to do grad- 
uate work or teach. 

11-12 Beginning Latin 

A study of pronunciation, essential forms, and the principles of 
syntax. The aim of this course is to develop as quickly as possible 
an ability to read Latin in simple texts. May not be counted toward 
a major or a minor. 
Four hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

13-14 Intermediate Latin 

Selected orations of Cicero with supplementary reading in Eng- 
lish, Vergil's Aeneid, including a study of the poem as a whole, its 
sources, poetical diction and its mythological background. Prere- 
quisite, two years of high school Latin. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

21-22 Ovid and Catullus 

Selections from Ovid's Metamorphoses. Shorter poems of Catul- 
lus. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

31-32 Horace 

Selections from Horace's Odes, Epodes, Satires, and Epistles. A 
study of Horace as a satirist, philosopher, lyric poet, and literary 
critic by a representative study of his words. Prerequisite, Latin 13 
and 14, or four years of high school Latin. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

33 Roman Drama 

Selected plays of Plautus and Terence. Collateral reading on the 
origin, development and technique of Roman comedy. Alternates 

with 35. 

Three hours. Three credits. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 87 

34 Roman Historic Writers 

Passages from Livy's Ab Urbe Condita dealing with the mythical 
age of Roman kings. Selections from Suetonius and Tacitus will be 
studied in the light of their contribution to Roman imperial history. 
Alternates with 36. 
Three hours. Three credits. 

35 Martial 

Martial's Epigrams; a study of the epigram as a literary form; 
its source and influence. Alternates with 33. 
Three hours. Three credits. 

36 Latin Language and Prose Composition 

A review of forms and of principles of syntax, drill in reading 
and writing Latin, and a study of Latin style and idiom. Alternates 
with 34. 
Three hours. Three credits. 

38 Latin Literature in English 

This is a survey of Latin literature with an intensive study of 
illustrative authors in English translation. The course is designed 
to give the student an opportunity of becoming acquainted with the 
treasures of literature. No knowledge of the Latin language is 
required. 
Two hours. Two credits. 



MATHEMATICS 



<s 



Courses 13, 14, 21, 22, 23 and six additional hours are required 
for a major. Courses 13, 14, 21, 22, 23 are required for a minor. 
Students majoring in mathematics should carry a minor in physics. 

1-2 Introduction to College Mathematics 

An introduction to the study of the elementary mathematical 
functions. This course is designed for those whose high school 
mathematics have not been sufficient. 
Three hours throughout the year. No college credit. 

13 College Algebra 

An introduction to the study of elementary algebraic functions 
and the solution of equations. Also progressions, permutation com- 
binations, probabilities and determinants. 
Five hours. Three credits. Mr. Robison 



88 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

14 Trigonometry 

The study of the trigonometric functions and logarithms with 
application to triangles. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Robison 

21 Analytic Geometry 

A study is made of systems of coordinates and the relation between 
equations and loci. Prerequisite, Courses 13 and 14. 
Four hours. Four credits. Mr. Robison 

22-23 Calculus 

The concepts and fundamental formulae of differentiation and 
integration are studied and applied to problems involving maxima 
and minima, lengths, areas and volumes. Prerequisite, Course 21. 
Four hours throughout the year. Eight credits. Mr. Robison 

25 Mathematics of Finance 

The mathematical theory underlying interest, annuities, depre- 
ciation, mortality, insurance, and investments. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Robison 

31 The Foundation of Algebra and Geometry 

A critical analysis of the fundamental concepts and methods of 
reasoning in mathematics. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Robison 

32 The Teaching of Mathematics 

A course in the methods of teaching mathematics in the secondary 
schools. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Robison 

33 Advanced Calculus 

A study of the theoretical aspects of calculus, with particular 
emphasis on infinite processes and the concepts of limit and continu- 
ity. Prerequisite, Courses 21, 22, and 23. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Robison 

34 Advanced Calculus 

A continuation of Course 33. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Robison 









COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 89 

35 Differential Equations 

The formation and geometrical meaning of differential equations 
and the standard methods of solution. Prerequisite, Courses 21, 22, 
and 23. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Robison 

37 Navigation 

A descriptive study of the problems of air navigation as outlined 
by the Civil Aeronautics Administration. The course includes a 
detailed study of meterology insofar as it affects the handling of 
aircraft. Prerequisite, Mathematics 13-14. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Houtz 

38 Surveying 

Classroom work and field practice in the care and use of surveying 
instruments, running lines and levels, establishing grades, plotting 
and computing areas, running profiles and cross sections. Stress is 
put on the use of the plane table and stadia. Prerequisite, Mathe- 
matics 13-14. 

Three hours. Three credits. 

Mr. Houtz 

40 Statistical Methods 

Methods of analyzing and presenting numerical data, with refer- 
ence to probability, averages, and measures of correlation. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Robison 



MUSIC 

21-22 History of Music 

A survey of the development of music from its beginning to the 
present. Current events related to the subject matter of the course 
are brought to the attention of the class. Course same as Music 17-18. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. Mrs. Sheldon 

30 Music Appreciation 

A course to develop an intelligent appreciation of music. For 
description, see Music 42. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mrs. Giauque 

The above courses are for Liberal Arts students. For complete 
description of courses offered in the Conservatory of Music, see p. 105. 



90 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

PHILOSOPHY 

31 Logic Mb. Lotz 
The guiding principles and conditions of correct thinking, the 

nature of the deductive and the inductive processes, and the basis of 
the scientific method. 
Three hours. Three credits. 

32 Introduction to Philosophy 

An attempt to get a clear understanding of metaphysical reality 
and to present the fundamental facts and principles in relation to 
the categories of thought. 
Three hours. Three credits. 

33 Ancient and Mediaeval Philosophy 

The history of the progress of philosophical thinking from the 
early Greek philosophers to the Renaissance. 
Three hours. Three credits. 

34 Modern Philosophy 

The history of the progress of philosophical thinking from the 
Renaissance to the present time. 
Three hours. Three credits. 

42 Modern Philosophers 

The philosophies of James, Royce, Bergson, Dewey, and San- 
tayana. 
Three hours. Three credits. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Courses for Men Mr. Stagq 

The war has caused a marked change in the program of required 
classes in Physical Education. The purpose to develop the physical 
well being of the student remains the same, but greater emphasis is 
placed on rugged health, endurance, strength and agility, as goals to 
attain. In addition, qualities of character such as courage, daring, 
poise under emotional strain, confidence in one's self and fair play 
are fostered. 

11-12M Physical Education 

Required in all college curricula. Covering the period from the 
opening of college to the Thanksgiving recess, the activities include 
calisthenics, football, soccer, touch football, combative games, track, 
golf and tennis. From the Thanksgiving recess to the spring recess, 
the classes meet in the gymnasium and the work consists of calis- 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 91 

thenics, informal gymnastics, basketball, volley ball, indoor baseball, 
handball and boxing. From the spring recess to commencement, the 
activities, include calisthenics, soft ball, track, baseball, combative 
games, tennis, hiking and golf. Classroom instruction is assigned. 
Three hours throughout the year. Two credits. 

21-22M Physical Education 

Required in all college curricula. The plan and nature of the 
work is similar to Course 11-12. Classroom instruction as assigned. 
Three hours throughout the year. Two credits. 

31-32M Physical Education 

Required in all college curricula. A continuation of course 21-22 
with the privilege of a wider range of sports, and recreational activi- 
ties upon an elective basis. Classroom instruction as assigned. 
Three hours throughout the year. Two credits. 

15-16M Physical Education — Restricted Activities 

These courses are planned in consultation with the student's physi- 
cian to meet the needs of individual students who are unable to pur- 
sue the regular courses. Classroom instruction as assigned. 
One hour throughout the year. Two credits. 

13-14M Personal Hygiene 

This course presents a wide range of materials concerning health- 
ful living. 
Two hours throughout the year. Two credits. 

Courses for Women 

Miss Sparhawk 
11-12W Physical Education 

A foundation course which aims to build a vital interest in team 
games. Hockey, soccer, volley ball, and basketball are played. 
Round Robin Tournament in each activity. Badminton and tennis 
in the second semester. Classroom instruction as assigned. 
Two hours throughout the year. Two credits. 
13-14W Personal Hygiene 

This course presents a wide range of scientific and educational 
materials. Information is presented through lectures, guided dis- 
cussions, surveys, group health projects, and term papers. 
One hour throughout the year. Two credits. 
15-16W Physical Education 

These courses are planned in consultation with the student's phy- 
sician to meet the needs of individual students who are unable to 
pursue the regular courses. Classroom instruction as assigned. 
Two hours throughout the year. Two credits. 



92 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

21-22W Physical Education 

A course designed to improve fundamental skills and technique 
throughout the team games. A wide range of folk dance material is 
presented in the second semester. Instruction in tennis. 
Two hours throughout the year. Two credits. 

27 EuRYTHMICS 

This course aims to enrich and develop the individual's musical 
ability by stimulating his bodily responses. The student learns to 
interpret meter, rhythm, and phrasing not as a mathematical prob- 
lem but as movement. 
Two hours. One credit. Mr. Flock 

28 Folk Dancing 

Purpose of this course is to develop through dancing the dances 
of different peoples and nations a keener artistic and humanistic 
appreciation of their physical and emotional expression, with a 
knowledge and understanding of their music. Also, it provides a 
teaching background in well-known and typical folk dances. 
Two hours. One credit. Miss Sparhawk 

31-32W Physical Education 

A course similar in nature to 21-22W. Classroom instruction as 
assigned. Badminton §jkd Archery in the second semester. Tourna- 
ments and meets will be planned by students. 
Two hours throughout the year. Two credits. 

41-42 Physical Education 

A course which emphasizes leadership in team games. The 
students plan and manage the intramural program. Instruction in 
coaching and officiating. Tap dancing and golf instruction will be 
given in the second semester. 
Two hours throughout the year. Two credits. 

PHYSICS 

Mr. Hoover 

Courses 11-12 and 16 semester hours of advanced physics are 
required for a major. Students planning to major in physics should 
plan their schedules to include at least a minor in mathematics. 
Courses 11-12 and 10 semester hours of advanced physics are re- 
quired for a minor. 

11 Introductory Physics 

A course in mechanics, heat and sound. Prerequisites : High 
School credits in algebra and trigonometry. 
Three lectures, one double laboratory period per week. Four credits. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 93 

12 Introductory Physics 

A continuation of Physics 11, studying electricity, magnetism 
and light. 
Three lectures, one double laboratory period per week. Four credits. 

21 Sound 

Production, propagation, and detection of sound waves ; vibrations 
of sounding bodies; Theory of acoustical measurements and instru- 
mentation. Prerequisite: Physics 11-12. 
Three lectures. Three credits. 

22 Electronics 

The phenomena of electron emission from solids; the physical 
properties of electron tubes, and the principles underlying their basic 
applications. Prerequisite: Physics 11-12. 
Two lectures, one double laboratory period per week. Three credits. 

31 Light 

Geometrical optics; elementary theory of wave motion; interfer- 
ence, diffraction, polarization, and dispersion of light ; introduction 
to spectroscopy. Prerequisite : Physics 11-12. 
Two lectures, one double laboratory period per week. Three credits. 

32 Atomic Physics 

Constituent particles of matter and kinetic theory; spectra and 
the structure of atoms and molecules ; nuclear energy. Prerequisites : 
Physics 11, 12, 31; Mathematics 21, 22, 23. 
Three lectures. Three credits. 

41 Mechanics 

Statics, elasticity, dynamics of solids and gravitation. Prerequi- 
sites: Physics 11-12; Mathematics 21, 22, 23. 
Three lectures. Three credits. 

42 Heat 

Thermometry, calorimetry, heat conduction, the laws of thermo- 
dynamics with their application to physical systems. Prerequisites : 
Physics 11-12; Mathematics: 21, 22, 23. 
Three lectures. Three credits. 

43-44 Electricity & Magnetism 

Fundamental phenomena of electricity and magnetism; circuit 
theory, including alternating-current circuits; electromagnetic radia- 
tion theory; theory of electrical measurements and introduction to 
practice of electrical measurements. Prerequisites : Physics 11, 12, 
22; Mathematics 21, 22, 23. 

Two lectures throughout the year. One double laboratory per week. 

Three credits. 



94 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

PSYCHOLOGY 

21 General Psychology 

An introductory course covering the entire field, designed to 
develop a scientific attitude toward psychological problems. A 
description of the receiving, connecting, and re-acting mechanisms. 
A survey of the emotions, sense-perception, imagery, attention, rea- 
soning, learning. Behavior is considered as environmental adjust- 
ment. This course is prerequisite for other courses in psychology. 
Three hours, one hour laboratory per week. Three credits. 

Mr. Waterbury 

22 Educational Psychology 

A study of the laws, characteristics, and the economy of the 
learning process with application to school subjects. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Waterbury 

24 Applied Psychology 

The principles of psychology applied to the vocations, business 
and industry. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Waterbury 

33 Mental Hygiene 

A study of the relationship of personal and environmental factors 
in the production of wholesome and unwholesome life adjustments. 
The sources of emotional conflict are considered, together with the 
formation of attitudes and reaction systems affecting personality 
coordination. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Waterbury 

34 Abnormal Psychology 

A survey of the principal forms of mental derangement and 
diseases, with emphasis upon their causes, symptoms, course of treat- 
ment. Trips to mental institutions are made whenever possible. 
College students may elect the course if they desire. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Waterbury 

41 Social Psychology 

A study of the interaction of individuals in their several group 
relations, the contacts of harmony, and conflict within groups as well 
as between groups, group controls, and the phenomena of imitation 
and suggestion. Course same as Sociology 41. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Stevens 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 95 

42 Child Psychology 

A study of the development of the child from infancy through the 
early teens. Motor, intellectual, emotional and social development 
will be considered, with special attention to the guidance of the child 
at home and at school. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Waterbury 

43 Educational Tests and Measurements in the Secondary 
School 

Historical background of testing; construction and use of tests; 
interpretation of results with emphasis on diagnosis of difficulties 
and remedial measures. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Waterbury 

44 Psychology of Adolescence 

A study of the physical, intellectual, emotional, and social de- 
velopment of the individual during the adolescent stage. Applica- 
tions to problems of secondary education, home guidance, and recrea- 
tion will be stressed. 
Three hours. Three credits. MISS Beatty 



SOCIOLOGY 

Mr. Stevens 
21-22 Principles of Sociology 

A systematic study of the fundamentals of human society such as 
the social processes, factors, functions, products, and underlying 
principles. Prerequisite : Sophomore standing. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

23 Anthropology 

As a background for the studies of sociology and philosophy, a 
course of three hours is offered in anthropology with special emphasis 
on its cultural aspect. 
Three hours. Three credits. 

31-32 Modern Social Problems 

The aim of the course will be to locate the significant problems of 
present-day society and to evaluate the current approaches to them. 
Among these problems are those of population, race, labor, delin- 
quency, poverty and dependence, and problems peculiar to rural and 
urban life. Prerequisite : Sociology 21-22. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 



96 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

44 Social Psychology 

A study of the interaction of individuals in their several group 
relations, the contacts of harmony, and conflict within groups as well 
as between groups, group leadership and group controls, the phenom- 
ena of imitation and suggestion. Course same as Psychology 41. 
Prerequisites: Sociology 21-22; Psychology 21. 
Three hours. Three credits. 

45 Introduction to Social Work 

An introductory course covering the scope and function of the 
different fields of social work. The work of the classroom is supple- 
mented by special lectures and seminars by officials of the various 
social agencies. Prerequisite: Sociology 21-22. 
Three hours. Three credits. 

46 The Family as a Social Institution 

The origin and development of the family, function, and relation 
to other primary and secondary groups; the problems of family life 
and how to meet them. Prerequisite : Sociology 21-22. 

Three hours. Three credits. 



SPANISH 

Miss Kline 

Courses 45 and 46 and electives in advance of 11-12 to make a 
total of 24 hours are required for a major. 

Courses totaling 18 hours in advance of 11-12 are required for a 
minor. Students planning to teach should include courses 45-46 in 
the 18 hours. 

Students choosing a Spanish major are urged to elect a minor in 
another foreign language. It is also recommended that they elect 
related courses in history, art, philosophy, and other languages and 
literature. 

11-12 Elementary Spanish 



A course in pronunciation, elements of grammar and in reading, 
writing and speaking simple Spanish. Some time is devoted to the 
introduction to Spanish civilization and culture. May not be count- 
ed toward a major or minor. 

Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 97 

21-22 Intermediate Spanish 

A course in grammar, conversation and reading of Spanish and 
Spanish- American prose. Prerequisite: Spanish 11-12 or two years 
of high school Spanish. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

31-32 Survey of Spanish Literature 

Lecture and reading course. Study of representative authors 
with special emphasis on the Golden Age and its achievement. Col- 
lateral reading, reports and discussion. Prerequisite: Spanish 21-22. 
Alternates with Spanish 43-44. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

33-34 Modern Drama 

A study of the drama from the romanticists to the present. Read- 
ings with reports and discussion of representative works of Hartzen- 
busch, Echegaray, Galdos, Benavente, los Quinteros and other 
authors. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

41-42 Modern Novel 

A critical study of literary movements since 1850, as exemplified 
in the works of such novelists as Pardo Bazan, Galdos, Valdes, Pio 
Baroja and Valle Inclan. Collateral reading, reports and discussion. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

43-44 Spanish American Literature 

A study of the development of Spanish American literature from 
its beginnings. Collateral reading, reports and discussion. Alter- 
nates with Spanish 31-32. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 

45-46 Advanced Composition and Conversation 

Intensive study of grammar. Oral and written themes, letters, 
etc. ; class conversation and ear-training. 
Three hours throughout the year. Six credits. 



SPEECH 

28 Public Speaking Mr. Gilbert 

Emphasis on the practice of speaking in public, together with the 
content and composition of a speech. This course, offered each 
semester, will be required of all pre-ministerial students and prospec- 
tive teachers. 
Three hours. Three credits. 



THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



The Conservatory of Music of Susquehanna University offers 
complete courses of instruction in Pianoforte, Singing, Violin, Organ, 
and Public School Music. The courses are planned with a view to 
developing a high degree of musicianship in students, giving them, 
besides the technique of their special study, that comprehensive in- 
sight into the nature and structure of music which can be obtained 
only from a practical study of Harmony, Form, and other theoretical 
subjects. 

ENTRANCE CREDITS 

Candidates for the degrees in Music must present entrance credits 
equivalent to a four-year high school course and show evidence of 
aptitude in music. 

MUSIC EDUCATION" 

Susquehanna University Conservatory of Music is approved by 
the State Department of Public Instruction for the education of 
supervisors and teachers in Public School Music. 

CONSERVATORY STUDENT ORGANIZATION 

All students taking work in the Conservatory of Music are mem- 
bers of the organization. Officers are elected from among the stud- 
dents, and preside at the meetings of the Recital Class as well as 
other student sessions. All matters pertaining to the welfare of the 
Conservatory of Music are considered through this organization. 

UNIVERSITY BANDS 

The marching band offers opportunity for the schooling of the 
individual marching bandsman in the routine of intricate maneuver 
and drill formation. 

In the concert band standard overtures, suites, and symphonic 
movements of the great masters are studied. Adequate technical 
facility, ability to read music readily, and a feeling for genuine in- 
terpretive skill are emphasized. College credit. 

98 



THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 99 

SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY ORCHESTRA 

Symphonic orchestral experience is gained in the study of stan- 
dard literature. Instruction is given in orchestral technique and 
methods of rehearsing. Adequate technical facility, ahility to read 
music readily, and musicianship are necessary for entrance to this 
orchestra. College credit. 

SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY CHORUS 

This choral group of mixed voices meets two periods per week, 
heing a required course for all sophomores and juniors in music. 
College students may elect the course if they desire. Choruses and 
cantatas are studied, and appearances are made in various recitals 
during the year. College credit. 

RULES AND REGULATIONS 

No reduction is made for absence during the first two weeks of 
the semester, nor for subsequent individual absences. 
All sheet music must be paid for when given out. 

Special holidays declared by the faculty will be observed. Les- 
sons missed because of such action will not be made up by any teacher 
without the consent of the director. 

Students must consult the director before arranging to take part 
in any public musical exercise outside of the regular work. Too 
often students bring unjust criticism on the teacher by appearing 
before an audience without having had sufficient preparation. 

Absence from class or private lessons requires that satisfactory 
excuses shall be offered. Failure in the matter lowers class standing. 

Reports showing attendance, scholarship, deportment, etc., are 
issued at the close of each semester. 

For further information concerning courses, tuition, etc., address 
— Director of the Conservatory of Music, Susquehanna University, 
Selinsgrove, Pa. 

RECITALS 

Students' Evening Recitals — Each semester, recitals are given 
in which students who have been prepared under the supervision of 
the instructors take part. These recitals furnish incentives to study 
and experience in public performance. 

Students' Recital Class — Students who are not sufficiently 
advanced to participate in the Evening Recitals are given experience 
in public performance in the Recital Classes which meet once each 



100 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

month. Rules governing stage deportment are brought to the atten- 
tion of the pupils, and topics of general interest to music students 
are discussed. These classes are not open to the public but an excep- 
tion is made in the case of near relatives. 

Artist Recitals — Important to the student of music is the hear- 
ing of compositions of the great masters as interpreted by artists of 
recognized ability. It is the purpose of the management to provide 
such recitals at the University at a nominal cost to the students, as 
well as to assist in making it possible to hear similar recitals in 
nearby cities. 

PRACTICE TEACHING 

The Senior Class in Music Education teaches and observes in the 
Public Schools of Sunbury, Selinsgrove, and Middleburg. This work 
is done under the direction of Mrs. Alice H. Giauque, B.S., A.M., 
Instructor in Methods, Susquehanna University; Katherine Reed, 
Mus.B., Supervisor of Music, Sunbury Public Schools; Mrs. June 
Hendricks Hoke, Supervisor of Music, Selinsgrove Public Schools. 

COLLEGE CREDIT 

College students may elect any of the theoretical subjects and 
have them count as "college electives." 

EXPENSES 

For the best results in piano, singing, organ, violin, etc., in which 
individual instruction is given, students should take two periods of 
instruction each week. This is in accordance with the general practice 
of conservatories of music. The university year is divided into two 
semesters of equal length. 

The total charge to boarding students for the year, including tuition, 
board, room rent, and all other fees ranges from $810.00 to $830.00 for 
men, and $810.00 to $850.00 for women. 

The total annual charge to day students, registered for the degree 
ranges from $450.00 up depending on the schedule taken. 

Two hours of daily practice on a piano are included in the above rates. 
Organ practice is an additional expense. Its cost is listed under mis- 
cellaneous expenses. 

The following tuition rates per semester are quoted for students not 
registered for a degree course: 

PIANO, SINGING, PIPE ORGAN, VIOLIN, etc. 

Fkeshman and Sophomore Yeaks 

One semester — 2 one-half hour lessons per week $60.00 

One semester — 1 one-half hour lesson per week 30.00 



THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



Junior and Senioears 
One semester — 2 one-half hour lessons p<eek _ 
One semester — 1 one-half hour lesson peeek _ 



101 



$80.00 
40.00 



Sub-Freshman lr 
PIANO, VIOLIN, CLARINET, TRIVET, TROMBONE, etc. 

One semester — 2 one-half hour lessons pveek icon 

One semester — 1 one-half hour lesson p^eek lb.00 



MISCELLANEOUS TENSES 

Rent of three-manual organ — one semest-5 hours per week — $25.00 

Rent of three-manual organ— one semest2 hours per week „ 1U-UJJ 

Rent of two-manual organ — one semester hours per week k'oo 

Rent of piano — one semester, 1 hour eachy om) 

Rent of piano — each additional hour, onemester "•J™ 

Private lessons in all theoretical subjectsach -i(\(\ 

Sight Playing library fee — one semester _' ftf . 

Rent of any orchestral instrument, one aester &,u 

Music theory subjects not taken for crt toward a degree shall be 
charged at the rate of $12.00 per semestihour. 



102 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

COURSE RECREMENTS FOR DEGREES 
BACLOR OF SCIENCE 



Ioloist Course 



reshman Year 



First Semester 



Cr. 



Piano, Singing, Organ or 

Orchestral Instruments, 2 

Second Solo Subject ~_ l 

Harmony II 3 

History of Music 17 3 

Sight Reading 13 "" 2 

Dictation 15 __ __ 2 

English II & Lib. "Science"""" 3 

Physical Education II _ 1 

Personal Hygiene 13 __"Z_ 1 

18 



Second Semester 



Cr. 
Piano, Singing, Organ or 

Orchestral Instruments 2 

Second Solo Subject 1 

Harmony 12 3 

History of Music 18 3 

Sight Reading 14 2 

Dictation 16 2 

English 12 3 

Physical Education 12 1 

Personal Hygiene 14 1 



18 



phomore Year 



Piano, Singing, Organ or 

Orchestral Instruments _ 2 

Second Solo Subject ___ 1 

Harmony 21 _ 2 

Dictation 25 I__" 2 

Eurythmics 27 __I " 1 

English Literature 21 "__ 3 
General Psychology 21 _~ 

Chorus ^ 

Sight Reading 23 I ~~ 2 

17 



Piano, Singing, Organ or 

Orchestral Instruments 2 

Second Solo Subject 1 

Harmony 22 (Keyboard) 2 

Elements of Conducting 2 

Folk Dancing 1 

English Literature 22 3 

Public Speaking 28 3 

Chorus 1 

Elective 2 



17 



Junior 
Piano, Singing, Organ or 

Orchestral Instruments ___ 2 

Second Solo Subject 1 

Harmony 33 (Form & Anal". _ 2 

Adv. Instrum. Conducting 35 _ 3 

rrench or German 3 

Sight Playing (Piano)~37 ~_" 1 

Chorus ■, 

Jr. Recital Preparation 2 

Elective 3 



18 



Year 

Piano, Singing, Organ or 

Orchestral Instruments 2 

Second Solo Subject 1 

Harmony, 34 (Composition) 2 

Adv. Choral Conducting 36 3 

French or German 3 

Sight Playing (Piano) 38 1 

Chorus it 1 

Junior Recital 3 

Art Appreciation 32 3 

19 



THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



103 



Senior Year 



First Semester 

Cr. 
Piano, Singing, Organ or 

Orchestral Instruments 2 

Simple Counterpoint 51 2 

Sight Playing (Piano) 43 1 

French or German 3 

Bible 21 2 

Music Appreciation 1 

Senior Recital Preparation 3 

Elective 3 



Second Semester 

Cr. 
Piano, Singing, Organ or 

Orchestral Instruments 2 

Double Counterpoint 52 3 

Sight Playing (Piano) 44 1 

American History 22 3 

Bible 22 2 

Music Appreciation 42 1 

Senior Recital 5 



17 



17 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MUSIC EDUCATION 

This course has been approved bj the State Council of Education 
for the preparation of Supervisors and Teachers of Public School 
Music. 



Freshman Year 



Harmony 11 3 

History of Music 17 3 

Sight Reading 13 2 

Dictation 15 2 

English 11 & Library Sci. 3 

Physical Education 11 1 

Personal Hygiene 13 1 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, 
Chorus, Band, and Orchestral 

Instruments 3 

18 



Harmony 12 3 

History of Music 18 3 

Sight Reading 14 2 

Dictation 16 2 

English 12 3 

Physical Education 12 1 

Personal Hygiene 14 1 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, 
Chorus, Band, and Orchestral 

Instruments 3 



18 



Sophomore Year 



Harmony 21 2 

Sight Reading 23 jl- 2 

Dictation 25 £— _ 2 

Eurythmics 27 ( 1 

History of Civilization 23 3 

General Psychology 21 3 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, 
Chorus, Band and Orchestral 

Instruments _' 3 



Harmony 22 (Keyboard) 2 

Methods and Materials 24 3 

Elements of Conducting 26 2 

Folk Dancing 28 1 

Public Speaking 28 3 

English Literature 22 3 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, 
Chorus, Band and Orchestral 

Instruments 3 



16 



17 



104 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 



Junior Year 



Harmony 33 (Form) 2 

Methods & Materials 31 3 

Instrumental Conducting 35 __ 3 

Principles of Sociology 3 

Intro, to Education 3 

Voice, Piano, Gig'an, Violin, 
Chorus, Band and Orchestral 

Instruments 3 



17 



Harmony 34 (Composition) __ 2 

Methods & Materials 32 3 

Adv. Choral Conducting 3 

Art Appreciation 3 

Educational Psychology 3 

Voice, Piano, Qrgmr, Violin, 
Chorus, Band and Orchestral 

Instruments 2 



16 



Senior 

Music Appreciation 41 1 

Bible 21 2 

Science Survey 11 3 

Ed. Measurements 47 2 

Student Teaching and 

Conference 45 6 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, 
Chorus, Band and Orchestral 

Instruments 2 

16 



Year 

Music Appreciation 42 1 

Bible 22 2 

Orchestration 48 2 

American History 22 3 

Student Teaching and 

Conference 6 

Voice, Piano, Qiipwn, Violin, 
Chorus, Band and Orchestral 

Instruments 2 

16 



INSTRUMENTAL COURSES 



Elementary Class Instruction in Band and Orchestral Instruments 

Students are taught the principles underlying; the playing of band 
and orchestral instruments. Problems of class procedure in the pub- 
lic schools are discussed. Ensemble playing is a part of the work 
done. 

String Group — Two hours per week through two semesters. 

Woodwind Group — Two hours per week for two semesters. 

Brass Group — Two hours per week through two semesters. 

Percussion — One hour per week. One semester. 

Advanced Class Instruction in Band and Orchestral Instruments 

Further study may be pursued in Band and Orchestral [nstru- 

ments as follow- : 

String Choir (Viola, Violoncello, and Bass Viol) 
Woodwind Choir (Flute, Oboe, and Bassoon) 



THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 105 

Brass Choir (All brass instruments not studied in the elementary 
classes.) 
Smaller Ensembles 

String Trio 

String Quartet 

String Quintet 

Violin Choir 

Brass Ensemble 

"Woodwind Ensemble 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

11 Harmony 

A study of first essentials in music ; scales, intervals, note and rest 
values, musical terms, etc., thereby laying a foundation for further 
harmonic writing and musical development. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Hatz 

12 Harmony 

The supertonic, submediant, and mediant harmonies, with their 
sevenths and their inversions as well as simple chromatic alterations 
are studied. Melody writing and melodic invention using these 
simpler harmonies are a part of this semester's work. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Hatz 

13 Sight Reading 

Students read at sight music of moderate difficulty, using the 
sol-fa syllables as well as words. Tone and rhythm are stressed. 
Three hours. Two credits. Miss Potteiger 

14 Sight Reading 

The work of the first semester is continued introducing chromatics 
and more difficult intervals and rhythms. Two and three-part songs 
with words add to the interest of this course. 
Three hours. Two credits. Miss Potteiger 

15 Dictation 

A study of tone and rhythm enabling the student to sing and write 
melodic phrases which have first been visualized. 
Three hours. Two credits. Mr. Flock 



106 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

16 Dictation 

Melodic dictation is continued throughout this semester, stressing 
the development of memory in writing longer phrases with melodic 
and rhythmic accuracy. 
Three hours. Two credits. Mr. Flock 

17 History of Music 

- The development of music from its beginnings to the period of the 
classical composers is covered in this semester. Current events are 
brought to the attention of the class each week and students are 
encouraged to do such reading in the library. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mrs. Sheldon 

18 History of Music 

Music and musicians from the classical period to the present, to- 
gether with current events, are given serious consideration. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mrs. Sheldon 

21 Harmony 

The study of chromatic harmony and chord species is included in 
Harmony III. This material is applied in various types of modu- 
lation. Original melody writing and modulation using the material 
are a part of the course. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Hatz 

22 Harmony 

Knowledge of diatonic harmonies, non-chordal tones, easy chro- 
matic chords, and modulation, are applied to the keyboard. Included 
in the course are transposition, sequences, and creative work at the 
keyboard. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Hatz 

23 Sight Reading 

This course presupposes that the student has satisfactorily com- 
pleted Courses I and II. New material is constantly used, and speed 
and accuracy in reading from the G and F clefs are required. 
Three hours. Two credits. Miss Potteiger 

24 Methods and Materials 

The work covered in the course includes music materials .suitable 
for the elementary grades, textbooks, songs, and classroom music 
procedure. One hour per week will be devoted to "applied methods," 
including observation and preliminary practice teaching in the 
schools. 
Four hours. Three credits. Mrs. Giauque 



THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 107 

25 Dictation 

Harmonic dictation is designed to develop ability to recognize and 
write chord progressions, making use of the various harmonies as 
they are required. 
Three hours. Two credits. Mr. Linebaugh 

26 Elements of Conducting 

Principles of conducting; study of methods of conductors; daily 
practice in adapting these methods to school purposes; score reading 
and program making are points receiving attention. Orchestral and 
choral conducting are a part of the student's experience. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Hatz 

27 EURYTHMICS 

This course aims to enrich and develop the individual's musical 
ability by stimulating his bodily responses. The student learns to 
interpret meter, rhythm, and phrasing not as a mathematical prob- 
lem but as movement. 
Two hours. One credit. Mr. Flock 

28 Folk Dancing 

Purpose of this course is to develop through dancing the dances 
of different peoples and nations a keener artistic and humanistic 
appreciation of their physical and emotional expression, with a 
knowledge and understanding of their music. Also, it provides a 
teaching background in well-known and typical folk dances. 
Two hours. One credit. Miss Sparhawk 

31 Methods and Materials 

The work covered in the course includes music materials suitable 
for the intermediate grades, textbooks, songs, and classroom music 
procedure. One hour per week will be devoted to "applied methods," 
including observation and preliminary practice teaching in the 
schools. 
Four hours. Three credits. Mrs. Giauque 

32 Methods and Materials 

A study of music courses for junior and senior high schools. 
Among the problems considered are classification of voices, methods 
of dealing with the adolescent voice, assembly, music clubs, bands 
and orchestras, and routine work pertaining to these departments. 
Four hours. Three credits. Mrs. Giauque 



108 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

33 Harmony 

This course includes a study of the motive, the phrase, period 
forms, two and three-part song forms, rondo forms, sonata form, etc. 
Detailed analysis is presented in connection with each lession. 
Two hours. Two credits. 

34 Harmony 

Included in this course is creative application of material of all 
previous harmony courses. Composition in various vocal and instru- 
mental forms is presented and the best work is given performance 
before the music students. 
Two hours. Two credits. 

35 Advanced Instrumental Conducting 

Consideration of the methods and principles of conducting applied 
to the orchestra and band. Development of baton technique, score 
reading, orchestral playing and the psychology of rehearsing 
ensembles of various sizes and combinations. Orchestral literature 
adaptive to public school work is studied in this course. Opportunity 
is given the student to conduct compositions of different character. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Hatz 

36 Advanced Choral Conducting 

A more detailed study of the principles of conducting applied to 
choral groups. A discussion of points helpful in the organization 
and direction of church choirs, mixed choruses, a cappella choirs, and 
larger groups producing oratorios. The young conductor is given 
opportunity to appear before groups, acquiring power through such 
experience in this particular field, enabling him to be at ease when 
called on to serve in the capacity of a choral conductor. 
Three hours. Three credits. Mr. Haskins 

37-38 Piano Sight Playing 

Students of the Junior Year who elect to major in Piano or 
Organ are given two periods each Aveek in ensemble playing. Music 
of average difficulty is placed before them for sight reading. 
Two hours throughout the year. Tivo credits. Mr. Linebaugh 

39 Instrumental and Vocal Fugue 

Contrapuntal writing reaches its culmination in the Fugue. Two, 
three, four and five voiced fugues are written by the student. Analy- 
sis of fugues by Johann Sebastian Bach is included in this course. 
Two hoios. Tivo credits. 



THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 109 

41 Music Appreciation (P.S.M.) 

Methods — An outline course of study on procedure and appli- 
cable materials for the Elementary, Intermediate, and Junior High 
School. 
Two hours. One credit. Mrs. Giauque 

42 Music Appreciation (General) 

The development of a critical judgment of music through an 
appreciation of various forms and modes, through recordings and 
renditions by faculty and visiting artists. General appreciation is 
particularly suitable for college students. 
Two hours. One credit. Mrs. Giauque 

43-44 Piano Sight Playing 

Students of the senior class who elect to major in piano or organ 
are given two periods per week in ensemble playing similar to that 
in the Junior year, but with music of greater difficulty. 
Two hours throughout the year. Two credits. Mr. Linebaugh 

45-46 Student Teaching and Conference 

The seniors in Music Education observe and do teaching in the 
public schools of Selinsgrove and Sunbury under the supervision of 
their methods instructor and members of the faculty mentioned under 
Practice Teaching. In addition to the student teaching they have 
critic classes and special conferences. 

Mrs. Giauque 

47 Educational Measurements 

The measurement of specific capacities or abilities involved in 
the hearing, appreciation and performance of music, based on a 
scientific analysis of elements which function in all music. The 
techniques of administering aptitude tests for the discovering and 
developing of music interest are practised and applied. 
Two hours. Two credits. 

48 Orchestration 

This course is devoted to arranging music for the orchestra and 
implies an intimate knowledge of the range, qualities, and varied 
capabilities of all orchestral instruments. Attention is given to 
scoring accompaniments for high school choral literature. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Hatz 

51 Simple Counterpoint 

Melody against melody is written throughout the five species, be- 
ginning with two-part and continuing up to eight voices. 
Two hours. Two credits. Mr. Linebaugh 



110 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

52 Double Counterpoint and Canon 

Counterpoint so written that it may be removed an octave, tenth, 
or twelfth above or below the cantus firmus. Canons (direct imita- 
tion) are written in all intervals and prepare the student for the more 
advanced contrapuntal work in instrumental and vocal fugue. 
Three hours. Three credits. 

53 Instrumental Technique Class 

A laboratory class designed to give the student opportunity to 
inquire into, discuss, and experiment with the problems and tech- 
niques of teaching and performing which confront the music educa- 
tor on the flute, oboe, bassoon, and percussion. 
One hour. Mrs. Hatz 

54 The Marching and Concert Band 

This course is arranged to give the student a background in pro- 
paring the band for out-of-doors and concert activities. Marching 
fundamentals, band drills, and rehearsal techniques are emphasized 
along with the introduction of musical literature applicable to the 
various stages of this work. 
One hour. Mr. Flock 



PIANOFORTE 

Sub-freshmen — First, Second and Third Grades — The New 
England Conservatory Graded Course for Piano, Books I, II, III 
and Pieces of corresponding difficulty. 

Freshman Year — Scales in parallel and contrary motion mem- 
orized and played. Arpeggios built on the three triad positions. 
Technique, touch, and phrasing. Etudes: Duvernoy, Op. 120; 
Czerny, Op. 636; Loeschhorn, Op. 52; Kohler, Op. 242. Sonatinas 
— Clementi, Op. 36 ; Gurlitt, Op. 54 — The Clavecin Book of Anna M. 
Bach. Pieces of corresponding difficulty. 

Sophomore Year — Scales in Thirds and Sixths memorized and 
played. Arpeggios built on the Diminished Seventh Chord. Technic, 
touch, phrasing, and memorizing. Etudes — Loeschhorn, Op. 66 ; 
Czerny, Op. 299. Schirmer Sonata Album, Vol. 239. (Haydn, 
Mozart, Beethoven.) J. S. Bach-Busoni — Two-part Inventions. 
Pieces of corresponding difficulty. 

Junior Year — Scales in Accents; scales with two and three notes 
against one and two. Arpeggios built on the Dominant Seventh 
Chord. Technique touch, phrasing, memorizing, interpretation, and 



THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 111 

ensemble playing. Etudes — Cramer's Fifty Selected Studies ; Czerny, 
Op. 740 with metronome. Sonatas — Beethoven. J. S. Bach-Faelton 
— Three-part Studies. Pieces of corresponding difficulty. 

Junior Recital 

Senior Year — Technique, touch, phrasing, memorizing, interpre- 
tation, and ensemble playing. Etudes — dementi's Gradus ad Par- 
nassum, Chopin's Studies. Sonatas and Concertos by Beethoven, 
Schumann, Mendelssohn, etc. J. S. Bach — Preludes and Fugues. 
Pieces of corresponding difficulty. 

Senior Recital 



SINGING 

Introduction — To major in singing, the applicant must possess 
certain qualities and talents requisite to the accomplishments of a 
singer, including a healthy throat. 

Freshman Year — A study of the vocal instrument. Respiration 
and exercises for developing lung capacity. Correct posture and 
plastic exercises for developing freedom of bodily motion. Vowel 
sounds and consonants in definite form. Articulating organs. Hum- 
ming. Vocal Hygiene. Songs in medium compass of voice. Con- 
centration. Memory. Vocal technique based on the major scale. 
Sieber Vocalises. 

Sophomore Year — Routine drill on vocal technique. Major and 
minor scales. Italian diction. Vaccai Studies. Concentration. Song 
literature. Songs — Schubert, Brahms, Mozart, "Wolf, Handel, and 
Gluck. 

Junior Year — Routine drill on vocal technique. Chromatic 
scale. Phrasing. Embellishments. Panofka vocalises. Vocal style. 
Memory. Concentration, Interpretation. Mimicry. Poise. Songs 
in Italian, French, or German. Songs in English and Latin. 

Junior Recital 

Senior Year — Daily Vocal Drill. Advanced technique. A study 

of the Trill and Messa di Voce. Bordogni vocalises. Mimicry. Song 

literature — classic and modern. Oratorio. Opera. 

Senior Recital 

Chorus Class 
A study of music applicable to high school groups, amateur 
choruses, and choirs. An acquaintance with choral music from Bach 
to the present. Discussion of choral music, voice testing, and ways of 



112 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

judging compositions. This course is open to college students. It is 
required of sophomores and juniors in the Music Education Course. 
One hour. One-half credit for college students. Mrs. Giauque 



PIPE ORGAN 

The object of this department is to prepare practical organists for 
the church service as well as concert playing. 

To be admitted to this course the student must have attained a 
reasonable piano technique and fluency. 

Two lessons per week are required for the Sophomore, Junior, and 
Senior years. 

Freshman Year — General outline of the construction of the 
organ. "The Organ" by Stainer. Pedal Studies. Easy Trios by 
Schneider, and other organ composers. Playing of hymns. Easy 
organ pieces. 

Sophomore Year — Dudley Buck's 18 Studies in Pedal Phrasing. 
Organ Trios of moderate difficulty. Little Preludes and Fugues by 
J. S. Bach. A study of organ registration, and playing of hymns 
and easier anthems. Organ pieces of moderate difficulty. 

Junior Year — Technique, interpretation, registration. Truette — 
34 Pedal Studies from J. S. Bach's works. The easier movements 
from Sonatas for Organ by Mendelssohn, Guilmant, etc. Preludes 
and Fugues of moderate difficulty by J. S. Bach and Mendelssohn. 
Advanced anthems and service playing. Pieces of corresponding 
difficulty. 

Junior Recital 

Senior Year — Preludes, Toccatas and Fugues by Bach, Guil- 
mant and others. Sonatas and advanced concert pieces by Rhein- 
berger, Widor, Dethier, etc. 

Senior Recital 



VIOLIN 

Sub-freshman Year — S cales and Technics — Blumenstengle 
Scales, Bk. 1. Methods — Bang, Pts. 1, and 2, or Hohmann, Bks. 1, 
and 2. Studies— Wohlfahrt, Op. 45, Bk. 1. Kayser, Op. 20, Bk. 1. 
Pieces — 1st position 

Freshman Year — Scales and Technics — Blumenstengle Scales, 
Bk. 2. Sevcik School of Bowing, Pt. 1 Studies— "Wohlfahrt, Op. 
45, Bk. 2. Kayser, Op. 20, Bk. 2. Wohlfahrt, Op. 74, Bk. 2. 
Pieces — 1st and 3rd positions. 



THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 118 

Sophomoke Year — Scales and Technics — Schradieck Scales. 
Sevcik, Op. 1, Bk. 3. Sevcik School of Bowing, Pts. 1 and 2. Studies 
—Kayser Op. 20, Bk. 3. Mazas, Op. 36, Bk. 1. Sitt, Op. 22, Bk. 3 
or Kayser, Op. 57. 
Solos — 1st and 5th positions. 

Junior Year — Scales and Technics — Schradieck Scales. Schra- 
dieck School of Violin Technics, Pt. 1. Sevcik, Op. 8 and 9. Studies 
— Mazas, Op. 36, Bk. 2. Dont, Op. 37. David, The Advanced Stu- 
dent, Pt. 2. Sonatas and Concertos by Viotti, Mardini, Bach, and 

Mozart. 

Junior Recital 

Senior Year — Scales and Technics — Schradieck Scales. Casorti 
Op. 50. Dancla, Op. 74. School of Velocity. Studies. Florillo, 36 
Caprices. Kreutzer, 42 Studies. Rode, 24 Caprices. Sonatas and 
Concertos by Mendelssohn, Bruch, Wieniawski, and Viotti. 

Senior Recital 



THE SECOND "SOLO SUBJECT" 

Candidates for graduation in piano shall have taken at least three 
years in voice, violin, or organ. For graduation in voice, violin, or 
organ, the student shall have completed the Sophomore requirements 
in piano. 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



The first Alumni Association at Susquehanna University was 
organized June 4, 1884. The Association now embraces 2,700 alumni 
and former students: 35% are teachers, 12% ministers, 8% business 
men, 3% physicians, 3% lawyers; and all of the leading professions 
are represented. Susquehanna alumni are located in thirty-six states 
and many foreign countries. There are eighteen district alumni 
clubs active in Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey, Delaware, 
District of Columbia, Maryland, and California. 

The Susquehanna University Alumni Association is governed by 
the Association officers and Alumni Council. The Association pub- 
lishes "The Susquehanna Alumnus," sponsors an annual Alumni 
Fund, and organizes alumni affairs in the districts and on the campus. 



Officers of the Alumni Association 

Honorary President, Dr. George E. Fisher, '88 Selinsgrove 

President, Ernest F. "Walker, '21 Johnstown 

First Vice-President, Harry M. Eice, '26 Bloomfield, N. J. 

Second Vice-President, Horace M. Hutchison, '36 Morrisville 

Recording Secretary, Ruth Bergstresser, '34 Hazleton 

General Secretary, Ruth E. McCorkill, '43 Northumberland 

Treasurer, A. Banner Portzline, '16 Selinsgrove 

Statistician, Edwin M. Brungart, '00 Selinsgrove 

Executive Committee of Alumni Council 

Ernest F. Walker, '21 Johnstown 

Harry M. Rice, '26 Bloomfield, N. J. 

Horace M. Hutchison, '36 Morrisville 

Ruth Bergstresser, '35 Hazleton 

Ruth E. McCorkill, '43 Northumberland 

George F. Cassler, '20 Coraopolis 

Raymond H. Klinedinst, '24 York 

114 



115 

LADIES' AUXILIARY OF SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

On February 4, 1922, a group of ladies directly interested in the 
growth of Susquehanna University met in Seibert Hall and effected 
an organization known as the Ladies' Auxiliary of Susquehanna 
University. 

The aim of the Auxiliary is to promote the interests of Susque- 
hanna University both spiritually and financially, and to support 
such undertakings as shall be authorized by the general body. 

Six sub-auxiliaries have been formed. Mount Carmel, April 10, 
1937, Lewistown, April 26, 1937, Johnstown, May 1, 1938, Williams- 
port, October 17, 1940, Hazleton, October 22, 1940, and Harrisburg, 
February 25, 1941. 

It is hoped that through the activities of these auxiliaries, aid may 
be given in more extensive advertising, in the improvement of condi- 
tions in the buildings and on the campus, and in general work for a 
greater Susquehanna. 



DEGREES CONFERRED AND 
LIST OF STUDENTS 

DEGREES CONFERRED IN 1947 

Bachelor of Arts 

Donald Ray Bashore v _ Bloomfield, N. J. 

Robert Trone Bowman ■__, Hanover 

Ronald Herbert Boyer* -—, Pillow 

Jacqueline Lee Braveman J. New York, 1ST. Y. 

Naomi Elizabeth Day,/ Red Lion 

Helen Grace Felton vi___ Elizabeth, N. J. 

Margaret Helen Johns ^ Honesdale 

Ella Jean Kelly /_ Goshen, N. Y. 

Helen Virginia Lepley z.. Winfield 

Marvin Wesley Maneval*v: Newport 

Nancy Elizabeth Myers J. Elizabethtown 

Stanley Leo Nale** J. Harrisburg 

Ongkar Narayan* *^ j Essequibo, British Guiana 

-George Ellsworth Riegel «/! "Williamsport 

Margaret Jane Schnure _*/ Selinsgrove 

Oscar Stanley Stonesifer, Jr.** >/- Harrisburg 

Adah Arlene Wolfe <— Mill Hall 

Bachelor of Science 

Victor Peter Alessi Coraopolis 

William Earl Bomgardner* Hershey 

Ferdinand Alphonse Bongartz Bloomfield, N. J. 

Ralph Condit Brown, Jr.** Bloomfield, N. J. 

William Robert Camerer, Jr. Jersey Shore 

Gayle Virginia Clark V_ Drexel Hill 

Frank Corcoran Coraopolis 

Leah Marguerite Cryjler -/ Woolrieh 

Helen Eby Doss** X Newport 

Clair Harold Eastep Harrisburg 

Robert Charles Fellows Altoona 

Eugene Paul Grandolini Scranton 

116 



LIST OF STUDENTS 117 

William David Gross Selinsgrove 

Sara Jane Gundrum .. Rockwood 

Raymond George Hochstuhl** Bloomfield, N. J. 

Edith. Augusta Kemp / Sunbury 

Mary Ann Lizzio** Conemaugh 

Robert Stanley Maddocks, Jr.* Bloomfield, 1ST. J. 

Hilda Mabel Markey •! York 

James Steidle Milford** Hazleton 

Richard Daniel Moglia** Glen Ridge, N. J. 

Allan Richardson Parcells* Auburn, "N. Y. 

John Milton Reichard Wilkinsburg 

Edward Richards* Mt. Pleasant Mills 

Howard Houston Solomon South Williamsport 

Joseph Taylor** Wildwood, New Jersey 

Dorothy Virginia "Wagner *1 Aldan 

Ruth Elizabeth Williams ^1. Bloomfield, JBT. J. 

Bachelor of Science in Music Education 

Franklin Ellsworth Fertig Northumberland 

Allen Williams Elock Sunbury 

Lenore Kathleen Garman Selinsgrove 

Eula Virginia Hallock Milton, N. Y. 

Jean Louise Huver Allentown 

Thomas Edison James Selinsgrove 

John Robert Leach Selinsgrove 

Betty Anne Miller 1 Williamsport 

William Boone Rothenberg Sunbury 

Louise Helen Schlick Kingston 

Marie May Talbot Reading 

Elise Claire Thompson Lynbrook, N". Y. 

**Requirements completed January 1947. 
*Will complete requirements in summer 1947. 



SENIOR HONORS 

Cum Laude 

George Ellsworth Riegel Williamsport 

Eula Virginia Hallock Milton, N. Y. 

Ella Jean Kelly Goshen, N. Y. 

Hilda Mabel Markey York 



118 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

PRIZES 

The Charles E. Covert Memorial Prize 
Eleanor Elizabeth Steele Harrisburg 

The Stine Mathematical Prize 
Miriam Jane Avery Kingston 

The Sigma Alpha Iota National Fraternity Music Prize 
Eula Virginia Hallock Milton, H". Y. 

Omega Delta Sigma Sorority Scholarship Prize 
Nancy Elizabeth Myers Elizabethtown 

Kappa Delta Phi Sorority Scholarship Prize 
Hilda Mabel Markey York 



LIST OF STUDENTS 119 

Senior Class 1947-48 

Apple, Joan Sunbury 

I Arseniu, Frosta Mary Lewistown 

Bathgate, Bessie Margaret State College 

Q Bergstresser, Dawn Ebert Selinsgrove 

Bergstresser, John Benjamin Selinsgrove 

> Bollinger, Marlin Raymond Northumberland 

Bringman, Dale S. Hanover 

Brown, Russell Franklin Roaring Spring 

Bomboy, David Edward Bloomsburg 

Boyer, Jack Wesley Sunbury 

Clark, William Samuel Bloomsburg 

Cooper, George Asbury South Williamsport 

Cosgrove, Donald Richard Bloomfield, N. J. 

Dankman, Herbert Stephen Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Dauberman, Lois Christine Nemacolin 

| Derr, Aloysius Vincent Ashland 

Doss, Virginia Audrey Cranford, N. J. 

Eilhardt, Edith Dorothy Clarks Summit 

^Fisher, Robert Alfred Selinsgrove 

'. Flickinger, Harry Stuard Sunbury 

Gaetz, Roberta Moser Mt. Carmel 

" Garard, Martha Evelyn Lewisburg 

Gibson, Ann Elizabeth Lewistown 

Glanzberg, Alvin Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Gould, Harriet Ann Johnstown 

Graybill, Caroline Mae McAlisterville 

Gundrum, Eugene Haines ,. Rockwood 

Harbeson, Carolyn Hope Milroy 

Hazen, Marianna Sunbury 

Hebel, Harold Lee Liverpool 

Herman, Carl Lindbergh Lewisburg 

Herrold, Donald LeRoy Port Trevorton 

Hopewell, Florence Strouse Proctor 

Howell, James Franklin Paxtonville 

King, Donald Alvin Sunbury 

Koons, Bernadine Marie Mt. Carmel 

Kramer, Harold Raymond Allentown 

Kreps, Julia Arlene Lewistown 

Krouse, Marlin Philip Shamokin Dam 

Lady, Charles Luther Biglerville 

Laks, Ruth Elaine Kingston 

Leisenring, Frances Marie , Bear Gap 

Lindemann, Richard William Bloomfield, N. J. 

Loss, Kenneth Donald Middleburg 

McClure, William Horting Lewistown 

Malkames, Ann Ross Hazleton 

Mengel, Marjorie Elizabeth Freeburg 

Packman, Allan Bernard Atlantic City, N. J. 

Peters, Helen Hope Reedsville 

Peyton, Joseph Paul, Jr. Red Bank, N. J. 

Polanchyck, Nedia Frackville 

Reichley, Gloria Irene Dover 

Reisch, Betty Katz Ashland 

Reitz, Daniel Irvin, Jr. Allentown 

Roberts, Gertrude Agnes New Monmouth, N. J. 



120 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Schreiner, Carol Kathleen Williamstown 

Sheetz, Anna Marie Mt. Carmel 

Shroyer, Shirley Irene Sunbury 

Smith, Betty Louise Woodsboro, Md. 

Smith, Sara Lee T Scranton 

Snyder, Charles William Lebanon 

Steele, Eleanor Harrisburg 

Stetler, Paul Beaver Middleburg 

Stout, Marie Eleanor Neptune, N. J. 

Stow, George Clifford, Jr. Merchantville, N. J. 

Tietbohl, Augustus Valentine South Williamsport 

Wagoner, Gaynelle Pylesville, Md. 

Walker, Virginia Marie Beavertown 

Walmer, Gloria Jane Harrisburg 

Weikel, Dexter Neil New Berlin 

Wiley, John Dexter Merchantville, N. J. 

Williams, Russell Henry Northumberland 

Williard, Joseph Raymond Lewistown 

Wohlsen, Robert Fischer Yonkers, N. Y. 

Wolfe, Franklin Robert Selinsgrove 

Wood, Mary Ellen Farmingdale, N. J. 

Woodring, Alvin James Bloomsburg 

Zeidler, Frank Albert Bloomfield, N. J. 

Junior Class 

Apriceno, Louis Paul Berwick 

Arthur, Cora Mae Hughesville 

Avery, Miriam Jane Kingston 

Billow, Grace Ellen McAlisterville 

Bingaman, Paul Rearick Thompsontown 

Bittenbender, Edwin Lee Berwick 

Blecher, Jean Elizabeth Danville 

Bloom, Kay Lee Sunbury 

Bogar, Joseph Edwin Selinsgrove 

Bottorff, Joyce Elaine Lewistown 

Boyer, Marland Paul Pottsville 

Brindel, Anna Margaret Lewistown 

Bubb, Robert Neil Selinsgrove 

Buffington, Ruth Mary Valley View 

Butts, Harry William, Jr. East Orange, N. J. 

Childress, Barbara Ellen York 

Cochrane, Virginia Wayne Bloomfield, N. J. 

Conrad, Theron Walter Sunbury 

Culp, Harry Conrad, Jr. Sunbury 

Dahlgren, Carl Eugene Williamsport 

Davison, Mary Cady Guaro, Cuba 

Day, Gilbert Oliver, Jr. Selinsgrove 

Derr, Jean Eleanor Selinsgrove 

Dornsife, Robert Lloyd Gordon 

Etzrodt, Edna Mae Scranton 

Everett, Nancy Ann Bayside, L. I., N. Y. 

Fetherolf, Ella .!mii, Freeburg 

Fetterolf, Frank Kinzey Johnstown 

Fisher, Millard George Berwick 

Ford, Edward Henry Northumberland 



LIST OF STUDENTS 121 

Fosselman, Donald W. Newport 

Gardner, Dorothy Eleanor Allentown 

Getsi.nger, Mary Ann Wildwood, N. J. 

Heim, John William Reading 

Hill, Betsy Jane Altoona 

Hbllenback, Daniel Leo Williamsport 

Hoover, Robert Stewart Elizabethville 

Houser, Stanley Paul Middleburg 

Houtz, Donald Barrett Northumberland 

Hugus, Howard Shannon Selinsgrove 

Jessen, Mary Jane Camas, Washington 

Johnston, Harry Ryan Greensburg 

Jones, Maude Bessie Shamokin 

- Kale y, Alice Marie Williamsport 

Keller, Juanita Belle Jefferson, Md. 

Kepner,. Lillian Mae Baltimore, Md. 

Kimble, James David South Williamsport 

Kiss, Isabel Marlboro, N. Y. 

Kuhns, Harvey Henry, Jr. Williamsport 

Latta, Margaret Helen Lockport, N. Y. 

Lau, Grace Elizabeth Spring Grove 

Leitzel, James Silas, Jr. Richfield 

Lorrah, Ruth Jane Williamsport 

Lybarger, Nina Frances Lampeter 

McAllister, Elwood Marlin Northumberland 

McHenry, Marjorie Ann Stillwater 

Madden, Edward Douglas, Jr. New York, N. Y. 

Matthews, Jean Elizabeth Middletown, N. Y. 

Mattson, Dolores Mae Coatesville 

Merz, Kenneth Malcolm Philadelphia 

Morris, Charles Albert Harrisburg 

Mummey, Stanley Henry Sunbury 

Nitchman, Dorothy Mae York 

Orr, Kenneth DeWitt East Orange, N. J. 

v Outerbridge, Warren Somersall Shelly Bay, Bermuda 

, Peters, James Burleigh Lock Haven 

Phillips, Muriel Alice Greenwich, Conn. 

Pirie, Warren James Bloomfield, N. J. 

Plock, William Lloyd Sunbury 

Radell, Robert William Williamsport 

Raup, Columbus Hill Sunbury 

Reaver, Mildred Katharine Gettysburg 

Reilly, James Bernard Lawrence, N. Y. 

Robson, Marion Cornell Marlboro, N. Y. 

Rohmann, Charles H. Ehrenfeld 

Rohrbach, Donald Paul Sunbury 

Ruhl, William Reuben Mifflinburg 

Savidge, Frances Alberta Shamokin 

Schneider, Katherine Anna Sunbury 

Schrieffer, Barbara Manhasset, N. Y. 

Schweighofer, Rita Fay Honesdale 

Shaffer, Dorothy Isabel Sunbury 

Sheetz, Wilfred Jack Selinsgrove 

Smith, Lawrence Moyer Freeburg 

Smith, Mary Helen r Sunbury 

Southwick, Margaret Jane Millburn, N. J. 

Speyer, Gabrielle Pamela New York, N. Y. 



122 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Stahl, Roy Edward ^ Pittston 

Steigerwalt, Marian Constance Schuylkill Haven 

Strawbridge, Irma Rosanna Lemoyne 

Swartz, Phyllis Irene Lewistown 

Tietbohl, Ralph Harry South Williamsport 

Venner, Charles Aked, III Bloomfield, N. J. 

Wanbaugh, Doris Elaine York 

Wegner, Edith May f New Brunswick, N. J. 

Wian, Charles Rothermel Sunbury 

Williams, Margaret Harriet Mt. Carmel 

Williams, Sarah Elaine Bloomfield, N. J. 

Wilson, Richard Llewellyn - Sunbury 

Winter, Robert Eugene , Williamsport 

Wright, Anne Barbara Hazleton 

Yancho, William Philip Morris Plains, N. J. 

Young, Jean Louise t South Williamsport 

Young, Lois Jane Lewistown 

Zerbe, Maynard Nelson Sunbury 

Zlock, Evan Paul Coaldale 

Sophomore Class • . 

Anderson, Barbara Elaine Johnstown 

Appleby, Margaret Catherine Mount Union 

Arthur, Douglas Earl Millersburg 

Auman, Cecilia Beatrice _, St. Mary's 

Auman, Fred Arthur, Jr. * Northumberland 

Babies, Donald Conemaugh 

Babies, Charles Seiler Shamokin 

Barr, Janet Frances Honey Brook 

Beigh, Harry Daniel Hai'risburg 

Bell, Joyce LeJeune Mount Union 

Benner, Ned Oliver ■ Sunbury 

Berkey. Ronald Ray Windber 

Bernstine, Earl LeRoy 'Williamsport 

Bickhart, Ai'thur Selinsgrove 

Bilger, Roy Renninger Selinsgrove 

Block, Robert Louis Philadelphia 

Blough, Virginia Eileen Johnstown 

Bobb, Marlin Oscar Herndon 

Rolig, Robert Morris Hummels Wharf 

Bollinger, Anna Jane New Oxford 

Bonish, Harry Michael Ashland 

Bresnock, Edward Andrew Ashland 

Brosius, Margietta Elizabeth Rebuck 

Buffington, John Hamilton Bloomfield, N. J. 

Buffington, Wilbur John Elizabethville 

Calvert, Frank Dreshman Ashland 

Campbell, Richard Ernest Selinsgrove 

Canals, Ernest Alfred Bloomfield, N. J. 

Chadwick, Henry Gardner Wildwood, N. J. 

Clark, Theodore Horace Prospect Park 

Comptou. Frai Valentine Egg Harbor City, N. J. 

Conrad, Calvin tiarvey, J;. Sunbury 

Conrad, James Henry Sunbury 

Davis, Donald R. Berwick 



LIST OF STUDENTS 123 

Davis, Thomas Roy , Shamokin Dam 

Decker, Barbara Ann * Melrose Park 

Deppen, Diane Gere Sunbury 

Deppen, Thomas Earl i' Herndon 

Derr, Donald James -i__ Buck Run 

Devine, John Gilbert — T Ashland 

Diaz, James .__ Coaldale 

Dimmick, George Clifton _. Northumberland 

Doig, Richard Rolland Honesdale 

Doran, John Bernard Downingtown 

Duncan, Burde Armand, Jr. Northumberland 

Duncan, Charles Harry Sunbury 

Dunlap, John Robert Abington 

Faddis, Phyllis Elaine Coatesville 

Felker, Richard Eugene Middleburg 

Fetherolf, Anna Lois Freeburg 

Fleming, Ray Edward Northumberland 

Foltz, Chiri Lola Reedsville 

Frankenfield, Robert "Madison Huntington, W. Va. 

Gehris, James Carl Berwick 

Gleason, Hanni Corinne Sunbury 

Goetz, Robert Lynwood Millerstown 

Goodling, Ben Leon Middleburg 

Gottschall, Charles Leon Muncy 

Gow, John III Marlboro, N. Y. 

Gumble, Doris Evelyn Paupack 

Guyer, Floris Leone Tipton 

Haffly, Paul Russell Belleville 

Hand, Jay Lamar Muir 

Hanis, George Francis Hazleton 

Harter, Forrest Jordan Harrisburg 

Henderson, Alvin Richard Atlanta, Ga. 

Herb, Paul Jonathan Sunbury 

Hoover, Lillian Lucille Sterling, 111. 

Hort, JoAnn Marie Sunbury 

Hospodar, John, Jr. Hazleton 

Houtz, Mary Patricia Sunbury 

Howling, Roger Cornelius Upper Montclair, N. J. 

Hrkman, Daniel Johnstown 

Huntington, Clair Irvin West Milton 

Hutchison, Marjorie Besse Mt. Union 

Jackson, Mary Jane Wildwood, N. J. 

Janson, Doris Elizabeth York 

Jenkins, Thomas Moorman Westfield, N. J. 

Kahler, Jeanne Louise Nazareth 

Kelley, Frederick Randolph, Jr. Sunbury 

Kershner, Richard Pawley Tamaqua 

Kirchman, Edward John Milton 

Kline, Susan Ann Bloomsburg 

Knecht, Lawrence Richard Sunbury 

Koch, Andrew Albert Hazleton 

Koch, Nancy Lee Manhasset, N. Y. 

Kohlweiss, Gertrude Marie Merrick, N. Y. 

Koontz, Roberta May Meyersdale 

Korkuch, Edward John Shamokin 

Kost, Rae Nelson Mechanicsburg 

Kundis, Harold Mt. Carmel 



124 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY, 

Kunkle, Brady Lewis Port Royal 

Ladika, Joseph Albert Mt. Carmel 

Lauver, Raymond Christian McAlisterville 

Lease, Barbara Jane Somerset 

Leeser, Mildred Reay .' Sunbury 

Lockwood, Anne Mary jj , Wayne 

Lombard; Bernice Dorothy itX.VitV^rAr^Arr Norwood 

McHenry, Roy Boyd j_j Berwick 

McKeever, Grace Jane \l Harrisburg 

Mack, Helen Marie Cornwells Heights 

Manning. Everett Marcus East Orange, N. J. 

Martin, Kenneth Elmer Newport 

Mease, Kenneth Frederick Selinsgrove 

Meerbach, John Calvin Stratford, Conn. 

Mertz, John Raymond Bath 

Miller, Mary Julia Honesdale 

Miller, Robert Ardell Liberty 

Miller, Vernon Jacoby Altoona 

Mincemoyer, Earl Howard Milton 

Minnich, Donald Martin Bradford 

Molinaro, Albert Philip, Jr. Montclair, N. J. 

Moyer, Marvin Row Northumberland 

Mussina, Rosemary Milton 

Nicklin, Shirley Alice Marlboro, N. Y. 

Orner, Jeanne Marie Bendersville 

Otto, Palmer Wilson Sunbury 

Oyster, Anna Mae Sunbury 

Paulhamus, Lewis Oliver Selinsgrove 

Penman, Jean Evelyn Strong 

Pfeiffer, Edward Franklin Weatherly 

Phillips, George William Herndon 

Polk, Helen Hoopes Merchantville, N. J. 

Popken, Janet Louise West Orange, N. J. 

Portzline, Abraham Bahner, Jr. Selinsgrove 

I ust, William Howard, Jr. Williamsport 

Price,, Marian Jane Ashland 

Ranck, Kenneth. James Milton 

Rau, Charles Franklin Selinsgrove 

Raup, Betty Jane Sunbury 

Reifsnider, Justine Hanover 

Reigle, John Luther Lewistown 

Reuther, John Alfred Nichols, Conn. 

Rhone, Earl Fasold Sunbury 

Ricedorf, Robert Elwood Ickesburg 

Robinson, Zola Ailene Lewistown 

Rohmann, Charles H. Ehrenfeld 

Rothermel, Jean Arlene Klingerstown 

Roush, Frances Jeanette Northumberland 

Rowe, Chester Graybill Selinsgrove 

Rowe, Harold Charles Lykens 

Rumbaugh, James Orville Millerstown 

Rush, Lucretia Elizabeth Cranford, N. J. 

Santangelo, Louis Franklin Northumberland 

Sarba, Mary Elmina Sunbury 

Satzler, Faye Arlene McAlisterville 

Shaffer, Richard William Selinsgrove 

Sharadin, Harold Leroy Middleburg 



LIST OF STUDENTS 125 

Shetler, Maria Jane Spring City 

Showalter, Shirley June Millmont 

Shuey, Mark Wesley Middletown 

Siemers, Louise Alvina Upper Montclair, N. J. 

Small, George Kenneth Paterson, N. J. 

Smith, Lillian Cora Nescopeck 

Smith. Mary Helen Sunbury 

Snyder, Mary Elizabeth Sunbury 

Solomon, Jack Mathew Athens 

Solomon, Joseph Michael Atlas 

Spogen, Marjorie Louise Turbotville 

Sullivan, Charles Andrew Youngwood 

Teter, Phyllis Ethel Northumberland 

Thomas, George Blair, Jr. Sunbury 

Troutman, Richard Eugene Pillow 

VanDyke, Willis Baum Lewistown 

Wagner, Paul Albert Milroy 

Watkins, Barbara Jane Scranton 

Wegner, Edith May New Brunswick, N. J. 

Weller, Kent Reginald Aristes 

Welliver, Barbara Sharretts Berwick 

Weste,rvelt, Richard George Bloomfield, N. J. 

Wetzel, Richard Lee Selinsgrove 

Wheat, Barbara ! Cedar Grove, N. J. 

Williammee, Phyllis Mary Millville 

Wissinger, Donald Altoona 

Witowski, John Joseph __„ Keiser 

Wohlsen, Donald Eugene Yonkers, N. Y. 

Wolf, Janet Eileen Johnstown 

Wright, John H. r Hazleton 

Yanovitch, George Alfred Nanticoke 

Yorty, Ann Elizabeth Selinsgrove 

Zimmerman, Harold Clayton Sunbury 



Freshman Class 

Abrahamson, David Earl ^ Hummels Wharf 

Aeciavatti, Richard Edward Mt. Carmel 

/Albert, Martha Louise Myerstown / 

Alexander, Marjorie Bertha Burnham^ 

/ Alter, Ben Calvin Shamokin 

Attinger, Katharine Jeanne Middleburg 

l-Bailey, Lyn New York, N. Y. 

•/Barnhart, Flora Marie Claysburg 

vBaumgardner, Fern Anna Windber 

/Beam, Marie Elizabeth , Windber 

Beckwith, Daniel Frederick Oakmont 

3 Beers, Marilyn Jeanne — __ Bloomfield, N. J. 

Benfer, Paul Lindberg fe Beaver Springs 

2-Bitting, Robert Lloyd _ ___ Marysville 

Blauser, Rhoda Arlene -_„:_-.. Mechanicsburg 

2-Bogar, Marsh Couldren Harrisburg 

,5*Bollinger, Herbert Orville Northumberland / 

Bor«hw*v-Donald LaRue Northumberland V 

Boyle, Alphonsus Lignori , Sunbury 

Boyle, Emmett Thomas Sunbury 



126 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 




♦•Branday, Walter Lee k Sunbury 

!:.■ atie t.uctile _ fc^= S**?*r*?? Beaver Springs 

jUBrobst, Hazel Jane ty. Sunbury 

Brosious. Emory Charles | Northumberland 

Blown, Floy Ann Westfield, N. J. 

Brown, Jack Alli-son Indiana 

Drown, Jack James ^i «. Sunbury 

Buehler, Paul Bernhard Paupack 

Burcher, Rhoda Marie Honesdale 

^Caldwell, Robert Luther __. Sunbury 

Charles, Kathryn Elizabeth Tyrone 

Cqmart, Martin I Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Cope, Nancie Louise * , Telford 

| Os-'iove, Nancy Jaae ai /t __i.^£'_ Mt. Carmel 

; D; vies. Barbara* XUMU*4^*™^ Chittenden, Vt. 

f/' 3Dove, Lewis Upshire, Jr. j Bloomsburg 

^9 > Dunn, Melvin Lucien 1 Enola 

Eagan, Martin Joseph 5. Bloomfield, N. J. 

2-Eccker, John Lawrence Nanticoke 

Edwards, Nancy Verona, N. J. 

Ejdys, Leon arc Edward Croydon 

Ellis, Ford _■_* Bloomfield, N. J. 

Ellis, Gladys Luc^le . Muncy 

Ent, Uzal Wellington t Mechanicsburg 

— . Erbe, Beverly Eeed Frackville 

£•"""* -^ Erdman, Daniel Raymond, Jr. Sunbury 

^"Fague, Marianne Esther Lancaster 

Fasold, Robert Eugene Sunbury 

I Faust, Burdell Somers ^y- Weatherly 

Fay r gaHy T ; ne - .5.2*. Hazleton 

*fFenstermacher, Robert John Sunbury 

'Ferguson, Althea Jean __, Millerstown 

Flfick, William Frank Sunbury 

/fFoltz, Susan Rachel Collingdale 

Fof-ter, William James, Jr. Pc*T _ ^-bti i\ "• Newportville 

Frederick, Margie Anna &^)<Z SflAr*-*. I/Ufc^rL Shamokin 

Fuhrman, Constance Elaine _'-_ Selinsgrove 

^Gacono, Venice Carl Wildwood, N. J. 

XjGaglione, Robert Keller Selinsgrove 

«3Gearinger. Jack William ... ... J^-. _J__AA__^__i Bloomsburg 

Geary. Marine Grosser JtSi^^J^^^^A^^^fl^.. Hazleton 

Goyne, June 1-ouise i^^^^_r>o-_.Ujriix^K, -j-1 Ashland 

IGroegei, Alice iricOone Havertown 

* Hackenberg, Robert Lee -\. ^_j Penn's Creek 

^j} * -■— -^ Hanis, Herbert Roy, Jr. East Orange, N. J. 

ITunvple, Dolly Luverne ' ! Bellwood 

I Harder, Jacob Bierbower, Jr. Camp Hill 

Harris, Richard Rodney Johnstown 

Hauber, Halsey Meade - Bloomfield, N. J. 

Haupt, Charles Raymond Sunbury 

3Hazeltine, Frederick Everett r Sunbury 

t Henninger, Robert JordAm / -f" Q . / JL Northumberland 

Her>j " Agnes iW"^*H^-tt_JL«"*_ Sunbury 

rierr, Charles Richard _ [ Shamokin 

Hershberger, Lois Ann ., Barnesboro 

t-f Hill, Jean PlorjW! ... Sunbury 

Hoffman, Carson Ecrward Sunbury 




/ 
LIST OF STUDENTS 127 

Hoffman, Shirley Mae Ashland**' 

Howard, Doris Ingrid -_ .__ Prospect Park 

C' Jones, Glenna Mae (?l Emporium 

^ Jones, Paul Roosevelt , Shamokin 

Kammer, Lucille Esther . ' Scranton< 

Karpinski, Gilbert Clement Ji^/l^J^ Shamokin 

Keene, pB\ r feE*y-I rraine Bloomfield, N. J. 

Kelly, Gregory William Ambler, 

Klingler, Joan Louise.^. t tp -Qx-^a, McClure 

Krepps, iv.ary Ann _ J^Af^ftr^A_ Jl^_«_^«^ft Mount Union 

Kunkle, Berniece Marie _*; Port Royal 

Landau, Lee Zelda Hazleton 

«3Lehman, Mary Elizabeth Newville 

Lewis, Theodore Russel Coaldale 

/MacNeil, Audrey Elwell Richland, N. J. 

^/McCahan, Carolyn Joy Port Royal 

Marrieyr-James Willis New Kensington / 

^Marek, Gardiner _ Atlantic Highlands, N. 3./ 

fcMartin, Alfred ___. East Orange, N. 5v 

i/Martin, Martha June Shamokin 

^Mitchell, Sally Ann Sunbury 

/Moorhead, Gerald Eugene Milton 

4|tMoyer, Robert Edwin ™ Selinsgrove 

JfO'Gara, Robert Martin __ TL Bloomfield, N. J. 

Oppel, Joan Eleanor .. — ^.^ Selinsgrove 

Oshirak, Alexander Theodore .1 5>_*> Wilkes-Barre 

tfPatterson, Robert Repse Tamaqua 

Peters, Mary Ann __. Mill Hall 

Pheasant, Ned Junior ^ McClure 

Post, lone Joan S3 Colorado Springs, Colo. 

{TPost, Joan Beth *• Bloomfield, N. J. 

Powell, Marjorie Joyce * Harrisburg 

Reed, Ellis Emmons, Jr. Bloomfield, N. J. 

$ Reese, Daniel Gower _^ Kingston 

Reitz, Donald James __i — Northumberland 

Reneker, Roy Edward — ...: Mechanicsburg 

Roessner, George Nicholas _i S.S Irvington, N. J. 

jf*Rosetti, Roland Richard South Canaan 

Rossiter, Janet Elizabeth Springfield 

Schlegel, Doris Irenp . . Dalmatia / 

|S'.h '■ 1 \ Sylvia JeaS Port Trevorton /.' 

Seiberc, Glenn __;;, ^ Harrisburgs//'/ 

Setzer, Joyce Jane Eastonv / 

Seybrecht, Lois LaRue Ashland / 

Shadle, Lois Marie ! Tower Citys/ 

jf Shafer, Merrill Wilbert Barnesville 

iJfShafer, Nelda Mae Barnesville 

/Shaffer, Leroy Charles Selinsgrove / 

Shepherd, Janet Elaine Lansdale J 

tfShoemaker, Donald Henry Pittsburgh^/ 

Shortt, Albert ___. Marlboro, N. Y. 

Sladek, Joseph ^____ Wildwood, N. J. 

^Slater, Mary Lou Irvington, N. J. 

) Smeltz, William Raymond Sunbury / 

% Smith, Harry LeRoy Herndon / / 

I Stallor, Thomas Owens Mt. Carmelv// 

Stauffer, Jack Herbert Harrisburg y/ 



128 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

^Stetler, Richard Allen __l^ t _____ J ,' fr---*-- Mifflintown 

Stever, Marian Adella _J/Ll^^*AJi .<tei±&h*S\rz. Crisfield, Md. 

S*iw*f"Afflna _'—• v i; Scranton 

& Taylor, Charles Willard 1 , Elmhurst 

Thomas, Doris Ada ^^.-^^ Lansdowne ' 

Thompson, Marjorie Marsh _CT <_2 Selinsgrove / 

Tierney, Elizabeth Frances Cedar Grove, N. J.// 

Traher, Edward Clayton , West PittstoVA 

Tweed, Harold Ray ■*. SunburyA 

4 Tyler, Roy Foster 'Z± ! Hummels Wharf 

Ulp, William Edwin n Northumberland 

I VanVoorhis, Jean Carol Pittsford, N. Y. 

Venner, Leslie Ford ... Bloomfield, N. J. 

Verbeeck, Hareth Hicks £_£ Sunbury 

Wagenseller, Donald Herbert -Jl__2^ Selinsgrove 

/Wagner, Walter Bruce Lewistown 

IWalker, John Edwin, Jr. Northumberland/ 

Walls, John Edward Altooi 

I Walton, Lucius Lamar Hackensack, N. J. 

I Weiler, Emil, Jr. Egg Harbor City, N. J. 

Weller, Carl Albert Montgomery 

Wertz, William Clyde Lewistown 

Wolrott, Robert Dean Northumberland 

Wolf, Trueman Edward Port Trevorton 

2Wolsten, Walter Irvington, N. Zj 

Wurth, Betty Ann iv Bloomfield, N. J. 

■Taroshuk, Mary L Wooden 

t|Yonghaus, Alice Grace Pompton Plains, N. J. 

3Young, Shirley Ann Quakertown 

Z^bman. Randall Alden __, Pottsgrove 

Zepp, Charlocte Jane __. .' Jl Owings Mills, Md. 

Special Students 

Edmunds, Rennel Raymond Selinsgrove 

Green, Bert Miller Sunbury 

Kotroba, Frank John Trevose 

Troutman, Martha Jane Elizabethville 

Wagenseller, Pearl Florence Selinsgrove 

Summer Session 

Abrahamson, Gwenn Ann Hummels Wharf 

Appleby, Margaret Catherine Mount Union 

Apriceno, Louis Paul Berwick 

Arthur, Douglas Earl Millersburg 

Auman, Fred Arthur, Jr. Northumberland 

Babies, Donald Conemaugh 

Bell, Joyce LeJeune Mount Union 

Bergstresser, John Benjamin Selinsgrove 

Bickhart, Arthur Eugene Selinsgrove 

Bilger, Aria Mae 1 Kreamer 

Bilger, Roy Renninger Selinsgrove 

Bloom, Kay Lee Sunbury 

Bogar, Joseph Edwin Selinsgrove 

Bollinger, Marlin Raymond Northumberland 



#w&, 



<T 5 < 



LIST OF STUDENTS 129 



Bomgardner, William Earl .. Hershey 

Bonish, Harry Michael Ashland 

Boyer, Jack Wesley ~ Sunbury 

Boyer, Marland Paul Pottsville 

Boyer, Roland Herbert : Pillow 

Broscious, Emory Charles Northumberland 

Brown, Russell Franklin Roaring Spring 

Bubb, Robert Neil Milton 

Calvert, Frank Dreshman Ashland 

Canals, Ernest Alfred Bloomfield, N. J. 

Clark, William Samuel Bloomsburg 

Compton, Frank Valentine Egg Harbor City, N. J. 

Conrad, Anna Christabelle Sunbury 

Conrad, Calvin Harvey, Jr. Sunbury 

Craver, John Stone Honesdale 

Dauberman, Lois Christine Nemacolin 

Davis, Thomas Roy Shamokin Dam 

Deitrick, Samuel Charles Sunbury 

Derr, Aloysius Vincent Ashland 

Devine, John Gilbert Ashland 

Dietrick, Charles R., Jr. Mifflintown 

Dietz, Lawrence Elliott Harrisburg 

Doig, Richard Rolland Honesdale 

Doran, John Bernard Downingtown 

Fasold, Robert Eugene Sunbury 

Fetterolf, Frank Kinzey Johnstown 

Fisher, Robert Alfred Selinsgrove 

Flickinger, Harry Stuard Sunbury 

Ford, Edward H. Northumberland 

Forney, Edna Katharine Thompsontown 

Furman, Harry James Sunbury 

Goetz, Robert Lynwood Millerstown 

Goodling, Ben Leon Middleburg 

Gottschall, Charles Leon Muncy 

Hanis, George Francis Hazleton 

Hazeltine, Frederick Everett Sunbury 

Henderson, Alvin Richard Atlanta, Ga. 

Herb, Paul Jonathan Sunbury 

Hoover, Robert Stewart Elizabethville 

Hospodar, John, Jr. _1 Hazleton 

Houtz, Donald Barrett Sunbury 

Houtz, Helen Joanne Selinsgrove 

Howell, James Franklin Paxtonville 

Hugus, Howard Shannon Selinsgrove 

Huntington, Clair Irvin West Milton 

Hutchison, Marjorie Besse _. Mt. Union 

James, Thomas Edison Selinsgrove 

Johns, Margaret Helen Honesdale 

Kelley, Frederick Randolph, Jr. Sunbury 

Kershner, Richard Pawley Tamaqua 

King, Donald Alvin Sunbury 

Kirchman, Edward John Milton 

Knecht, Lawrence Richard Sunbury 

Koch, Andrew Albert Hazleton 

Korkuch, Edward John ^ Shamokin 

Kramer, Harold Raymond Allentown 

Kreps, Julia Arlene Lewistown 



130 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Krouse, Marlin Philip Shamokin Dam 

Kundis, Harold Mt. Carmel 

Leach, John Robert Selinsgrove 

Leader, Roy Edward Northumberland 

Leitzel, James Silas, Jr. Richfield 

Lindemann, Richard William Bloomfield, N. J. 

Lombard, Bernice Dorothy Norwood 

Lybarger, Nina Frances Lampeter 

McAllister, Elwood Marlin Northumberland 

McClure, William Horting Lewistown 

McNally, Robert Luther Northumberland 

Mack, Helen Marie Cornwells Heights 

Madden, Edward Douglas, Jr. New York, N. Y. 

Maddocks, Robert Stanley, Jr. Bloomfield, N. J. 

Matthews, Jean Elizabeth Middletown, N. Y. 

Mease, Kenneth Frederick Selinsgrove 

Meerbach, John Calvin Stratford, Conn. 

Mertz, John Raymond Bath 

Merz, Kenneth Malcolm Philadelphia 

Mincemoyer, Earl Howard Milton 

Mummey, Stanley Henry Sunbury 

Narayan, Ongkar British Guiana 

Otto, Palmer Wilson Sunbury 

Packman, Allan B. Atlantic City, N. J. 

Parcells, Alan R. Auburn, N. Y. 

Pariot, Robert Thomas New York, N. Y. 

Peyton, Joseph Paul Red Bank, N. J. 

Plock, William L. Sunbury 

Ranck, Kenneth James , West Milton 

Rau, Charles Franklin Selinsgrove 

Raup, Columbus Hill Sunbury 

Reese, Margaret Ann Sunbury 

Reitz, Daniel Irvin, Jr. Allentown 

Ricedorf, Robert Elwood Ickesburg 

Richards, Edward E. Trucksville 

Rohmann, Charles H. Ehrenfeld 

Rothenberg, William Boone Sunbury 

Roush, Frances Jeanette Northumberland 

Schneider, Katherine Anna Sunbury 

Sheetz, Wilfred Jack =, Selinsgrove 

Small, George Kenneth Paterson, N. J. 

Smith, Lawrence M. Freeburg 

Snyder, Charles William Lebanon 

Speyer, Gabrielle Pamela New York, N. Y. 

Stahl, Roy Edward Pittston 

Steele, Eleanor Elizabeth Harrisburg 

Stow, George Clifford, Jr. 1 Merchantville, N. J. 

Thomas, George Blair, Jr. Sunbury 

Troutman, Beverly Jane Norristown 

Troutman, Martha Jayne Elizabethville 

Troutman, Walter Augustus, Jr. Elizabethville 

VanDyke, Willis Baum Lewistown 

Wagner, Paul Albert Milroy 

Wegner, Edith May , New Brunswick, N. J. 

Williams, Russell Henry Northumberland 

Williams, Joseph Raymond i. Lewistown 

Wilson, Richard L. Sunbury 



LIST OF STUDENTS 131 

Winter, Robert E. Williamsport 

Wohlsen, Robert Fischer Yonkers, N. Y. 

Wolfe, Franklin Robert Selinsgrove 

Woodring, Alvin James Bloomsburg 

Wright, John H. Hazleton 

Yancho, William Phillip : Morris Plains, N. J. 

Yorty, Ann Elizabeth Selinsgrove 

Zeidler, Frank Albert Bloomfield, N. J. 

Zimmerman, Harold Clayton Sunbury 

Zlock, Evan Paul Coaldale 



SUMMARY 

1947-48 

College of Liberal Arts 

M 
Senior 36 

Junior 51 

Sophomore 104 

Freshman 83 

Unclassified 3— 

277 179 456 

Conservatory of Music 

Senior 5 

Junior 3 

Sophomore 12 

Freshman 9 

29 47 76 

532 

Music Students Unclassified ** 14 42 56 

588 

Summer Term 1947 114 24 138 

Names Repeated 98 15 113 



w 


T 


26 


62 


39 


90 


53 


157 


59 


142 


2 


5 



11 


16 


13 


16 


10 


22 


13 


22 



— 

25 



Total -612 



132 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF COLLEGE 

STUDENTS ENROLLED IN THE 

REGULAR SESSION 

1947-48 

M W T 

Bermuda 1 1 

Colorado 1 1 

Connecticut 2 13 

Georgia 1 1 

Illinois 1 1 

Maryland 6 6 

New Jersey 35 25 60 

New York 10 13 23 

Pennsylvania 257 177 434 

Vermont 1 1 

Washington 1 1 

306 226 532 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Abnormal Psychology 94 

Academic Regulations 49 

Academic Year 54 

Accounting 36 

Administrative Officers and Staff 10 

Admission 49 

Advanced Accounting 66 

Advanced Calculus 88 

Advanced Instrumental Conducting 108 

Advisors, Vocational 34 

Algebra and Ceometry (Foundation of) 88 

Alumni Association 114 

American Government 85 

Ancient History 85 

American Literature 77 

Analytic Geometry and Calculus 88 

Anthropology 95 

Applied Psychology 94 

Appointment Bureau 35 

Art 59 

Athletics 20 

Attendance Regulations 53 

Auditing 66 

Awards for 1947 118 

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements 55 

Bachelor of Science Degree Requirements 56 

Bachelor of Science in Music Education 57-102 

Bacteriology 36 

Bible and Religion 60 

Bills (Payment of) 31 

Biology 62 

Boarding Facilities 27 

Board of Directors 8 

Bond and Key 22 

Bookkeeping Teaching Methods 71 

Book Store 28 

Botany 62 

133 



134 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

PAGE 

Buildings and Equipment 17 

Business Administration 63 

Business English 69 

Business Education 37, 47, 63, 69 

Business Mathematics 63 

Business Law 64 

Business Principles 63 

Calendar 4 

Chemistry 67 

Choral Conducting, Advanced 108 

Psychology of Adolescence 95 

Classification of Students 53 

College Algebra 87 

College Calendar 5 

College Credit 100 

College Mathematics (Introduction) 87 

Commercial Curriculum (The) 71 

Commercial Education 69 

Committees of the Faculty 15 

Committee of the Board of Directors 8 

Comparative Anatomy 62 

Conservatory of Music 98 

College Credits 100 

Entrance Credits for Music 98 

Music Education 98 

Pianoforte 110 

Pipe Organ 112 

Rules and Regulations 99 

Singing 111 

Violin 112 

Conservatory Student Organization 98 

Consumer Economics 73 

Cost Accounting 66 

Counterpoint 109 

Courses of Instruction 59-104 

Course Requirements for Degrees 55-102 

Credit Statements 53 

Day Students, Expenses 30 

Deans Honor List 54 

Degrees Conferred in 1947 116 

Description of Courses 105 

Dictation I, II, and III 105-106 

Discipline 22-23 

Economic Geography 71 

Economic History of the U. S. 72 

Economics 71 



INDEX 135 

PAGE 

Education 73 

English 76 

English Drama 78 

English Novel 78 

English Poetry 79 

Enrollment Statistics 132 

Entrance Requirements 49 

Equipment 17 

Events, Special 29 

Exclusion from the University 28 

Expenses 30 

Faculty 11 

Faculty Committees 15 

Faculty of Conservatory of Music 14 

Fees, Special 31 

Finance 65 

Foreign Trade 73 

Fraternities 22 

French 79 

French Composition and Conversation 81 

General Science 81 

German 81 

German Composition and Conversation 82 

Government, Student 20 

Graduation Fee 31 

Graduation Requirements 52 

Greek 83 

Gregg Shorthand 69 

Guidance, Educational and Vocational 34 

Gustavus Adolphus Hall 17 

Handbook 20 

Hassinger Memorial Hall 17 

Health Service 26 

Heredity 62 

High School Teaching 38 

Histology 63 

Historical 7 

History and Political Science 84 

History and Principles of Education 74 

Honor List 54 

Honors at Graduation 52 

Housing Facilities 27 

Introduction to Education 74 

Instrumental Courses 104 

Insurance 72 



136 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

PAGE 

Interests 19 

Introduction to Social Work 95 

Journalism 40 

Kappa Delta Phi 23 

Labor Problems 72 

Ladies' Auxiliary 115 

Lanthorn 20 

Latin 86 

Law 40 

Library 18 

Library Science 41 

Location 7 

Machine Accounting 64 

Major and Minor Requirements 51 

Marketing 72 

Marking System 50 

Mathematics 87 

Medical Aid and Nursing Techniques 69 

Medical Ethics 70 

Medical Secretarial 41 

Medical Shorthand 70 

Medical Terminology 69 

Ministry 42 

Money and Banking 72 

Music 89-98 

Music, Opportunities in 27 

Music Degrees Requirements 102 

Music Expenses 100 

National Honor Societies 21 

Navigation 89 

Office Practice 70 

Office Procedure 70 

Omega Delta Sigma 23 

Opportunities in Music and Art 27 

Organic Chemistry 68 

Payment of Bills 31 

Personal Attention 32 

Personal Hygiene 91 

Phi Kappa 21 

Phi Mu Delta 22 

Philosophy 90 

Physical Chemistry 68 

Physical Education 90 

Courses for Men 90 

Courses for Women 91 



INDEX 137 

Physical Therapy Technician 43 

Physics 92 

Pi Gamma Mu 21 

Pianoforte 110 

Pine Lawn 18 

Pipe Organ 112 

Practice Teaching 75 

Practice Teaching, Music 100 

Pre-Dentistry 44 

Pre-Medicine 45 

Pre-Nursing 46 

Pre-Theological Club 22 

Pre-Veterinary 46 

Preparation for a Career 36 

Accounting 36 

Bacteriology 36 

Business Administration 37 

High School Teaching 38 

Law 40 

Library Science 41 

Medical Secretarial 41 

Ministry 42 

Music 43 

Physical Therapy Technician 43 

Pre-Denistry 44 

Pre-Medicine 45 

Pre-Nursing 46 

Pre-Veterinary 46 

Psychology 47 

Secretarial 47 

Social Work 48 

Principles of Economics 71 

Prizes 23 

Psychology 94 

Abnormal Psychology 94 

Applied Psychology 94 

Psychology of Adolescence 95 

Educational Psychology 94 

General Psychology 94 

Educational Tests and Measurements in the Secondary School 95 

Social Psychology 94 

Public Speaking 77 

Publications 20 

Purpose and Objectives 16 

Quality Points 50 

Recitals 99 

Recognition by Accrediting Agencies 16 

Recreation 19-22 

Refunds 31 



138 SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Register, Students 116 

Registration 50 

Regulations 49 

Religion, Courses in 60-61 

Religious Life 19 

Reports on Grades 53 

Requirements for Admission 49 

Requirements for Graduation 52 

Requirements for Degrees 55 

Residence Requirements 53 

Resident Student Expenses 30 

Romance Languages: 

French 79-80 

Latin 86-87 

Spanish 96, 97 

Scholarship Grants 28 

Scholarships 24 

Scholastic Regulations 51 

Science, Bachelor of 57, 58 

Science, General 81 

Science, Library 41 

Secondary Education 39 

Secretarial Course 47 

Secretarial Medical 41 

Semesters, Summary of 5, 6 

Shorthand 69, 70 

Singing 111 

Social Life 19 

Social Work 48 

Sociology 95 

Sororities 22 

Spanish 96 

Special Events 29 

Special Fees 31 

Special Interest Clubs 21 

Speech 97 

Staff, Administrative Officers and 10 

Statistics on Enrollment 116 

Student Classification 53 



Library 
Susquehanna University